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To Wolv33

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To Wolv33
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, March 16, 2002 10:28 AM
I've been following your numerous threads these last few days and I feel I have to speak up so you don't make the same mistake I did 7 years ago. I assume through some of your questions that your pretty much a beginner and what worrys me is that your plannhing a trailer sized layout. Now I'm not certain if you've built a 4x8 layout yet but if you haven't DO IT! Put you current layout on hold for six months, less if you work hard at the 4x8. You'll never realize the things that you didn't know that you don't know. You'll thank yourself later. It's easy to ignore this advice. I did. I make a big mistake though, I've been through two layouts now which never got anywhere. Build the 4x8. You'll have more fun, learn more, and it'll get your dream layout started faster, hopefully without any false starts. Do this and I promise you you'll look back at your current layout design in six months and say "What was I thinking?"

Paul.
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Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, March 16, 2002 11:12 AM
I agree, Paul. Your advice to Wolv is sound. It echoes not only a recurring theme in the model railroad press, but also one which has been periodically addressed several times elsewhere in this forum.

Wolv, after you've read Paul's posting here, go to the "How did you get started" thread. There are several postings there that will reinforce Paul's good advice.

Just for the record, I'm also one of those who started with big plans but little experience. I also learned some hard and sometimes expensive lessons. There is far more to learn in this hobby than most beginners ever realize. The smart ones start small, develop their skills, learn their shortcomings, and then move on to the dream layout.
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Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, March 16, 2002 6:46 PM
Wolvarine, I greatly agree with what these guys are saying. I also have been fallowing your questions and it does sound like you don't have a lot of experiance. I'm not saying that to be mean, and we all learn by asking questions. If you haven't built a small layout, you should and I would recomend giong to your local library, look up the model RR section, pick out as many how to and detail books you can, and build that small RR using as many different techniques as you can find to see what works for you and which techs. you like. Then build that bigger layout. Like I said, we are not trying to be mean, just saving you from what a lot of us have already gone through. Best regards and good RR to you.......Jamie
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Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, March 16, 2002 9:45 PM
To wolvie, I started in this hobby almost two years ago and just got a 5x10 lauoyt "going". I had the good fortune to hear the same advice from some very sage modelers as well. I began amassing the hardware, tools, motive power, rolling stock, and last but not least Knowledge, that I would need to model easily. I am very happy and grateful to have started this way and believe it or not, Have saved countless hours and money on learning how to do what I want to do. I've been frustrated to the Nth degree but I did'nt have to rip out alot of track and structures. I wish you Good Luck and Happy Modeling.

John
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Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, March 17, 2002 8:50 AM
An additional thought, Wolv: even the "Great Poobah, hisself," John Allen, started out with a small layout. Later, when he was ready to start the grand G&D, he incorporated the small original layout in the bigger one.

I don't think you could go wrong following John Allen's example.
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Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, March 17, 2002 9:31 PM
Guys guys guys,

This is my fourth layout for me. I have done a 6 x 4, an 8 x 4, and two 8 x 4s back to back (16 x 4)... This is just the first layout that goes beyond what I already know, like wiring and major track laying. The older layouts I used 18 and 15 radius track and didn't require all that much wiring to do.

I have spoke to Ed on the board here, and we are kinda emailing back and forth.

We have come up with the idea to do a staged layout. That is, build the first stage, and be able to run trains while working on the next stage and so on... He is also helping me with my track design. I had the design all fouled up. You couldnt get to a derailment on the other side of the board, and there were no access points other than reaching across. Well, in some areas you couldnt reach over 12 feet. LOL! This was never a problem before, because I could simply walk around the 8 x 4 layouts, and even the 16 x 4 layout.

I appreciate all your thoughts and concerns, but I just wanted to tell you it is not my first layout. I do not plan to build this one overnight either. I know its going to be several months, if not a year or so, before this one is complete.

Thanks again.

-Wolv33
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Posted by Anonymous on Monday, March 18, 2002 1:06 AM
Well sounds like you do have quite a bit of experience. Hope you don't mind this entire thread. I just didn't want you to make a mistake.

When your done with the design I'd be intrested in having a look. A whole trailer is more space than I could dream of. I'd like to see what you've done with the space. Maybe it'll give me some ideas for my own layout.

Paul.
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Posted by Anonymous on Monday, March 18, 2002 7:40 AM
No problem Paul, and I do appreciate the help and the concern.

I plan to take pics of it as I go, and I will have all photos on my website. I will post the URL here when I have something up on the site. Thanks again.

-Wolv33
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Posted by Anonymous on Monday, March 18, 2002 8:28 AM
In no way am I attempting to "pooh-pooh" "The Great PooBah" as I followed every article on the the G&D Lines that I could get my hands on.

In addition to being a professional photographer John Allen was the absolute master of "smoke and mirrors"...and he used plenty of both!!!! Physically the G&D was not as large as it appeared to be. Mr. Allen had a knack for making us see more than was actually there. Wi***hat he was still around to show us what to do with all of the techniques we have today!!

"Smile down on us Great PoohBah!!...We're still trying..." Take Care and Have Fun....Vic
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Posted by Anonymous on Monday, March 18, 2002 9:49 AM
Wi***hat he was still around to show us what to do with all of the techniques we have today!!

Vic, you raise an interesting point, one that has been speculated on by others off and on over the years. I think it's especially interesting because of the way computer technology has become such an important component of the overall hobby (everything from laser-cut kits to DCC operations). How much of it would John have embraced? And more importantly, what new uses would he have found for it on the G&D?

And of course, there's all the "new" developments and products for scenery.

(I guess if we want a "sort of" answer, we need only look to George Sellios' F&SM; George admits to studying photos of the G&D almost every day for inspiration!)
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Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, March 26, 2002 6:06 PM
Wolvie,

Sorry for the confusion. It sounded like you were a 'novice', (more so than myself). Looks like you have a bit more expeirence than I do. Good luck and post your URL when possible, I'd be interested in taking a peek.

John
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, March 28, 2002 2:32 PM
No problem John.

Right now things are progressing slowly. While I am building up my diesel fleets and adding to my rolling stock, I am also acquiring models that have been purchased for available space on the layout. Testing has been on-going on hump design and implementation for the humpyard. I finally settled on a distance and height of the hump through many hours of testing it on track and cars. My humpyard and hump has been designed so that once the cars are released at the crest of the hump, by the switcher, they roll down into the classification tracks on their own power-simulating retarders and such. So far, it works great.

The design is going to be quite unique, in that it has never been done before, at least to my knowledge. It is a curved humpyard. Not exactly prototypical, but space became a problem when trying to locate the doubletrack mainline, branch line and several junctions and interchanges.

We are also going to place the staging area underneath the main layout, and it will serve the purpose of a coming and going area for out-of-area trains. One of the main interchanges will come from staging and eventually return to staging after making its rounds around the layout.

As I said earlier, pics will be posted as construction begins. I will keep you updated.

-Wolv33

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