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Jeffreys Track Side Diner for March 2024

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Jeffreys Track Side Diner for March 2024
Posted by hon30critter on Thursday, February 29, 2024 9:09 PM

Hello everyone!

Time to move the Diner. The only suggestion I recall seeing was to go to the Sierra Mountains. That's fine by me. Maybe we can get a little skiing in while we are there.

 

See you in the mountains!!

Cheers!!

Dave

P.S. The Diner got moved a couple of hours too early. Hope you are not offended.

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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Posted by Track fiddler on Thursday, February 29, 2024 9:40 PM

Good evening

Not at all Dave, move the Diner at random at any time.  Your appreciated hosting us hereSmile

Sierra Mountains rings a bell, I'm thinking there was some Shays up there. 

I'm hitting the rack, but "I'll Be Back" Whistling

 

TF

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Posted by NorthBrit on Friday, March 1, 2024 6:10 AM

Good morning Diners.   Thanks for moving the Diner, Dave.

A busy morning, so a coffee on the go please, Brunhilda.

 

As some members know I support the restoration & preservation of the paddle steamer, 'Medway Queen'.  As a way of raising money for work to be done they commission Dapol to make railway wagons.

As Medway Queen will be 100 years old this years models are of the builders,  Ailsa Shipping Co.

Medway Queen Preservation Society - Home

 

David

 

 

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Posted by York1 on Friday, March 1, 2024 6:35 AM

Good morning, diners.  Bacon, eggs, and coffee are on the menu this morning.

March is coming in like a lamb in our area -- maybe that means some stormy weather later in the month.

The Sierra Mountains are some of the most beautiful in the U.S.

The Keddie Wye:

 Keddie Wye by Todd Dillon, on Flickr

York1 John       

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Posted by NorthBrit on Friday, March 1, 2024 10:50 AM

img 2994

Trying to post from Flikr?

 

David

To the world you are someone.    To someone you are the world

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Posted by gmpullman on Friday, March 1, 2024 12:22 PM

Thanks for moving the Diner, Dave!

 

Jamestown, California:

 160926_40_jamestown by akmyers83, on Flickr

 160926_37_jamestown by akmyers83, on Flickr

 

Cheers, Ed

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Posted by Track fiddler on Friday, March 1, 2024 12:47 PM

Good afternoon

 

Oh, I'm here 'copyin' the mail' as the CBers used to say. We got a quick snow storm overnight and you'd think every plow and salt truck was up on blocks. My county had everything cleared but to my north, Lake County, there wasn't a plow in sight and several wrecks had some roads closed so I had to take a detour that made me ten minutes late to my appointment Bang Head

The Hiawatha twins are here to cheer the place up!

 

 Milwaukee Matrons by Edmund

 

Ya know, I've always liked the Hiawatha observation car viewed from the inside out, but the Hiawatha Twins definitely shine a new light on that subjectStick out tongue

Wouldn't have got any sleep in that Train room with those girls laughing and giggling all night long either EdWhistling

 

TF

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Posted by gmpullman on Friday, March 1, 2024 1:06 PM

Track fiddler
Ya know, I've always liked the Hiawatha observation car viewed from the inside out,

As built before color film:

 Hiawatha Skytop by Edmund, on Flickr

   — and some years later:

 Milwaukee Road Skytop Parlor 188 "Dell Rapids" - Observation end view by J.L. Nelson, on Flickr

 

Hope Mr. Pullman anticipated the need for a bilge pump on those 'boat tail' cars!

 Lansdowne listing Skytops by Edmund, on Flickr

Cheers, Ed

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Posted by BATMAN on Friday, March 1, 2024 3:05 PM

Good day eh.

Just got back from a short scoot of only 7km. It was clear and cold and the wind was cutting through us like a knife. Also with the wind, there was a lot of fallout from the trees coming down on us. I hit twice my minimum for the week so I can coast til Monday if I choose.

Thanks for moving the Diner Dave, always appreciated.

I watched Downton Abbey after all the seasons had aired as I usually do with limited series. I don't watch a lot of TV but everyone was always talking about how good it was and when it came up while looking for something to watch late one night I dove right in. It was really good IMO a real social commentary on status and privilege. Two things I remember were when WWI broke out all the rich people got asked if they wanted to or told that they could be a general if they wanted. No wonder so many got sent off to die by incompetence. The other was when the family just about lost their entire fortune when a Canadian RR went broke. It was one of the very few shows I could watch again, probably when I am rockin' in the old folks home.

The character of Matthew Crawley in Downton Abbey was played by actor Dan Stevens. When my son was in grade 11 he got called in for four days of work on a TV show. Depending on his call time I would pick him up at school and drive him into Vancouver while he did homework. 

The first day was costume fitting and static stills and video shots while they prepared/ measured for his costume. I could not believe the number of people involved in this process as he was the only one there.

The next week day two was the final fitting and more stills and video. There must have been twenty people there with just him.

Day three/four was the following week and the first day of shooting. I pick him up at school and we get to the set and the main character of the show is Dan Stevens. The kid is two hours in make-up before the shoot. That day and the next it was just him and Dan Stevens shooting scenes. My son was a creature that the Dan Stevens character kept thinking he saw in his delusional state. All the stuff they shot in those two days can be seen throughout all three seasons of the show.

They got along really well and became friends and still chat on FB regularly.

All the best to all.

 

 

Brent

"All of the world's problems are the result of the difference between how we think and how the world works."

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Posted by Track fiddler on Friday, March 1, 2024 3:26 PM

Evening

gmpullman

 

 
Track fiddler
Ya know, I've always liked the Hiawatha observation car viewed from the inside out,

 

As built before color film:

 Hiawatha Skytop by Edmund, on Flickr

   — and some years later:

 Milwaukee Road Skytop Parlor 188 "Dell Rapids" - Observation end view by J.L. Nelson, on Flickr

 

Hope Mr. Pullman anticipated the need for a bilge pump on those 'boat tail' cars!

 Lansdowne listing Skytops by Edmund, on Flickr

Cheers, Ed

 

 

Good Grief Mr. Pullman, get those rail ships out of the water!  What if those Twins drown? Tongue Tied

 

 

PS.  A Living Room like that would certainly make my Judy happySmile

 Hiawatha Skytop by Edmund, on Flickr

 

 

TF

 

 

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Posted by NorthBrit on Friday, March 1, 2024 5:31 PM

Brent.   In the film 'Elizabeth' starring Cate Blanchett  etc.  I had a small speaking part  filmed in Durham Cathedral.  Two full days to do a total of five minutes filming. 

I saw other scenes being filmed.  Each scene had around thirty people doing this, doing that as the actors did their part.

During a lull in filming a young girl, still a teenager, sat next to me.  She had a sketch pad and pencil and began drawing.   I asked her what she was drawing.

"See that section of wall over there?" she said, "I have to draw it and back at the studio it will be built and Lord Wolsingham  will open a door there and appear."

Dawn and I went to the cinema to see the film.   Just after my small speaking part, a camera  showed Wolsingham appearing  exactly as the girl said he would.

 

That's my 15 minutes of fame.

 

David.

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Posted by Track fiddler on Friday, March 1, 2024 5:43 PM

Evening

Had some pics to share, (They were Shays), but wouldn't you know it?  Imgur is jacked, maybe I'll have to switch to Flickr.

 

TF

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Posted by BATMAN on Friday, March 1, 2024 7:01 PM

NorthBrit
That's my 15 minutes of fame.   David.

That's a cool story, David. My kid was in a lot of things. Depending on his call time and how long they needed him, I rarely spent time with him there. I was always welcome at the catering truck and the food was fantastic so I would grab a bacon-wrapped filet and eggs if it was early. But he mostly drove himself or took transit to where he had to be. The whole thing looked like a pretty boring way to make a living to me, no thanks. He made really good money that helped him live like a King all through University.

I have no time in the limelight, however, when leaders of countries would visit and the news shows them getting off their airplanes, I often see myself in those old clips just in the background. I see myself when Clinton visited, as well as Queen Elizabeth, Charles and Diana, Margaret Thatcher, and several others. I have also been on all their aircraft at times if there was an issue I could help them with.

We just had a former Prime Minister pass away yesterday and I was remembering the time I was in a room with him and his chief of staff. I was doing a secure documents transfer and was chatting with him while the documents were being prepared. A really nice guy and so respectful in the way he talked to people.

Did a couple of secure documents transfer off this plane a couple of times. Once while Clinton was here and once it just made a pit stop to drop them off on the way West.

Almost happy hour, maybe a bit of rum tonight, it is a raw day.

All the best to all.

 

 

 

Brent

"All of the world's problems are the result of the difference between how we think and how the world works."

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Posted by NorthBrit on Saturday, March 2, 2024 5:14 AM

Good morning Diners.  A large coffee and blueberry muffin please,  Janie.

It is sleety rain falling.  Will it turn to snow?   Hope not as I have to go out soon.

 

Brent.    That's more than 15 minutes of fame.  lol.

 

Our daughter and grandchildren have gone out clothes shopping  as our treat.  I can see a few hundred pounds disappearing from our bank account  Hmm Laugh

 

Hopefully run some trains this afternoon.

 

David

To the world you are someone.    To someone you are the world

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Posted by BroadwayLion on Saturday, March 2, 2024 5:41 AM

The Route of the Broadway Lion The Largest Subway Layout in North Dakota.

Here there be cats.                                LIONS with CAMERAS

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Posted by Track fiddler on Saturday, March 2, 2024 6:05 AM

Good morning

Those look tasty LionDinner

Imgur changed their posting format.  It was a bit of a challenge to figure out this morning. 

We finally made it to Mr. Paul's for a Po' Boy yesterday.  Thought John would probably enjoy one too.  My treatWink 

I'd treat you all to one if you guys were hereSmile, Wink & Grin

The only Po' Boy available in Minnesota that I'm aware of.  It was really good, but not as good as the one in New Orleans at the gas station next to Barb's house though.  That one can't be beat.

 

Have a great Saturday ya'llSmile

 

TF

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Posted by Track fiddler on Saturday, March 2, 2024 6:54 AM

Some Sierra Shays for ya

 

TF

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Posted by NorthBrit on Saturday, March 2, 2024 8:39 AM

Good afternoon all.   A double Singleton, no ice please Brunhilda.

The girls are home armed with new clothes and shoes.  They had spent quite a bit of money, but not as much as expected.  Whistling

Just heard today of a model railway show being held locally.  Hopefully I shall take a look tomorrow.

 

Now to take younger granddaughter home; then go to the train room.

 

David

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Posted by York1 on Saturday, March 2, 2024 8:45 AM

Good morning, diners.

This day has started out much better than the past several days.  I got the streetlights installed in the streetcar parking lot, and they all work!  If I had started building a layout and had this much trouble, I probably wouldn't have continued.

My heart stress test results all came out great.  They were a little surprised at my slow heart rate as I sat waiting.  I think I'm just a lazy sloth at heart!

Traveling around eastern California is amazing.  The Sierra Nevada mountains are beautiful.  This is on the long stretch up to Donner Pass (famous for more than the trains!):

 

 Big Mac along the Truckee by Jonathan Lewis, on Flickr

 

Have a great Saturday, everyone.

York1 John       

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Posted by BATMAN on Saturday, March 2, 2024 11:07 AM

Good morning from a wet West Coast.

The wife is up to going for a walk today which is always a good sign. We'll probably do 5km which is what she can usually manage at a much slower pace than I do, but I am delighted she wants to go. We will wait a while before we go to let the wildlife retreat back into the forest somewhat.

York1
My heart stress test results all came out great.  They were a little surprised at my slow heart rate as I sat waiting.  I think I'm just a lazy sloth at heart!

John, a slow heart rate may be an indication of fitness (or not) My resting HR is 42 and my BP is 108/62 on average. My Garmin says I breathe 7 times a minute when I sleep. At 67 I never nap or have to get up to pee in the night all because I go for a rip with the dog(s) most days. Keep walking the dog.Laugh

My son was here yesterday and asked if I would sing and do a song on my guitar at their wedding. I said I'd think about it.Wink

This is the song they want me to do. I think it is for their first dance, then the DJ kicks in. I asked why they just didn't get the DJ to play Gord singing it. They said it was because they heard me play it so often when they stayed over while they were still in bed in the morning. Who knew?Smile

The kid has tickets for the Vancouver White Caps game this afternoon, not sure if we will end up going as we are both on the tired side. They are great tickets up in the sports bar at BC Place. If we don't go he just gives them to a friend by sending them on his phone, so convenient to be able to do that and it means they won't go to waste.

Another cup of coffee, a couple of hours on the guitar, and then a leisurely walk in the woods. Ruff life.

Time to get off my butt.

The fireplace will be on today in the mancave it is a raw day.

All the best to all.

 

 

Brent

"All of the world's problems are the result of the difference between how we think and how the world works."

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Posted by howmus on Saturday, March 2, 2024 2:17 PM

BATMAN
John, a slow heart rate may be an indication of fitness (or not) My resting HR is 42 and my BP is 108/62 on average. My Garmin says I breathe 7 times a minute when I sleep. At 67 I never nap or have to get up to pee in the night all because I go for a rip with the dog(s) most days. Keep walking the dog.Laugh

Hi Brent.

 

Interesting.....  I have been checking out my heart rate when finishing up running a 5k over at the fieldhouse.  I mostly just do a slow jog, but finish off with a sprint on the final lap.  I usually check my heart rate as soon as I finish.  Used to be about 130 or so back a few years ago but now is around 110.  Very quickly drops down to under 80 and back to 60 or less after I sit for a while.

My resting rate sitting at the computer is now about 55 which they say is "not bad" for a guy who is 77 years old.  Just did some checking on line and found that several sources say that 60 to 100 resting for adults (including Seniors) is considered normal range.  Guess I'm not doing too bad.....  Fitbit says I have put in well over 8,000 miles in the last 5 and a half years.  I was late getting started but very glad I did get myself running!

The big thing is for folks to keep moving! 

73

Ray Seneca Lake, Ontario, and Western R.R. (S.L.O.&W.) in HO

We'll get there sooner or later! 

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Posted by BATMAN on Saturday, March 2, 2024 3:25 PM

Ray, a resting heart rate of 55 is really good for a 77-year-old.

There are some heart recovery charts online that you should check out. You plug in your age, and heart rate at peak and then you put in the time it takes for recovery. So if you stop when your HR is at 130 you measure your HR at 15-second intervals and see how fast it drops.

If you can get a graph of your heart that tells you the same thing you will see your HR go up and down. If you are really fit the graph should go straight down as soon as you let off the gas. If it takes a while to return to normal, you need to back off a bit until you get more fit, or you are pushing too hard for other reasons.

Here is one of my days. You can see where I hit the hill, my HR shoots up. It is a long very steep climb and then levels off. You can see my recovery is straight down again and this is while I am still hoofing it along at a good clip but on flat ground.

My wife keeps checking to see if I am dead when I sleep because I don't make a sound and I do not move at all. I am usually in REM sleep at least half the night which is higher than normal even for a fit person. My heart rate can go as low as 37 BPM when I sleep and my respiration is 6 or 7 breaths per minute. I am so well rested that a mid-day nap just never happens. The only downside for me sleeping so well and not moving, because I am full of Arthritis it is really painful to move when I wake up.

I just did 4.83km with the wife today and my HR maxed out at 78BPM. It didn't even count as exercise on my Garmin.Laugh Normally I would go back out on my own but I've done plenty already this week so I'm good.

Brent

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Posted by ROBERT PETRICK on Saturday, March 2, 2024 5:16 PM

BATMAN and howmus, et al --

I walk 3 - 4 miles every day (7 days per week) at a fairly fast clip (3.5 - 3.6 mph). I also include a variation of the Harvard Step Test every other day for a short but significant cardio workout/analysis feature. Step-up-step-down, step-up-step-down, etc at a rate of 30 steps per minute for 5 minutes. My variation is that I use a 12" high platform (I built specifically for this purpose) instead of the official 18" high platform. I keep charts: pulse at start 0 minute, pulse at 5 minutes, and pulse readings at 6-, 7-, 8-, 9-, and 10 minutes after finish. The (downward) slope of the 5-minute recovery is the key analytic.

I'm sure there are instructions for the test and how to read the results online. This test has been used for at least 50 years that I know of.

You guys are an inspiration.

LINK to SNSR Blog


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Posted by gmpullman on Saturday, March 2, 2024 5:57 PM

On Donner... On Blitzen!

They make it look so easy —

Cheers, Ed

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Posted by hon30critter on Saturday, March 2, 2024 11:46 PM

Here is a bit about the history of the Donner Pass Summit Tunnels:

Explore the Donner Pass Summit Tunnels: Full Guide and Map

 

Updated on

01/13/2023

|by

The Donner Pass summit tunnels present a fascinating opportunity to explore California’s railroad history along with some gritty urbex graffiti. This guide will give you some history on the Donner tunnels along with practical advice for when and how to visit them.

Lake Tahoe Donner Tunnels- tunnel 7 silhouetteHiking through the dark Donner Pass Summit tunnel #6.

What Are the Donner Pass Summit Tunnels?

Donner Pass in California’s Sierra Nevada is one forbidding mountain gauntlet. It sits over 7,000 feet and its 300-500 inches of annual snowfall is more than just about anywhere else in the Continental US. In the 1800’s, the long rugged chain of mountains on California’s eastern border presented a huge challenge to those who wanted to settle here. In an effort to avoid the formidable mountain passes, most pioneers went north, using the Oregon trail. But there were some intrepid folk who attempted the Sierras at Donner. The beleaguered Donner Party of 1846, made a go of it. But their ill-timed October arrival to the area, combined with inexperience and bad luck did them in. Only half of their party survived the brutal winter.

Donner tunnels tunnel six exit bridge viewTunnel #6 exit, facing west.

Railroad engineer Theodore Judah was instrumental in bringing awareness to the need for a railroad over the pass. He surveyed the construction of four tunnels and snowsheds over the summit. He lobbied both railroad businessmen and the federal government in an effort to put some money and effort behind the completion of the transcontinental railroad. Sadly, he died in 1863 of yellow fever. He contracted it on a land transit of the Panama isthmus- a trip he probably wouldn’t have undertaken had the railroad been in place.

In 1862, President Lincoln signed the necessary legislation to fund the transcontinental railroad and in 1868, it was completed. Digging out those granite Donner Tunnels required backbreaking manual labor, most of it performed by contract Chinese labor. In fact, Chinese laborers built a lot of the California infrastructure in the 1800s. They weren’t paid well, they were mistrusted, and in 1882, strict immigration laws excluded them from citizenship. But we owe the backbreaking construction of the railway to their efforts.

Cheers!!

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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Posted by hon30critter on Saturday, March 2, 2024 11:53 PM
Donner Pass
Last revised: October 11, 2023
Donner Pass is a mountain pass in the northern Sierra Nevada, located above Donner Lake about nine miles west of Truckee, California.
It has a steep approach from the east and a gradual approach from the west. The pass has been used by the California Trail, First Transcontinental Railroad, Overland Route, Lincoln Highway and Interstate 80.
The pass gets its name from the ill-fated Donner Party who overwintered there in 1846. The area is known for its challenging railroad routes and is a popular spot for railfans.
Photos
45204o2wvvdf575294145743ywhwr574883.jpg
Amtrak FP7 #110 leads the "Reno Fun Train" over Donner Pass at Yuba Pass, California during a February snowstorm in 1975. Drew Jacksich photo.
History
One of the stiffest main lines in the west was Central Pacific's original route over the Sierra Nevada mountain range through Donner Pass, located in east-central California.
Years later the line became part of Southern Pacific's main line to the east where it connected with the Union Pacific at Ogden, Utah.
The route was legendary not only for its stiff grades but also brutal winters.  Snowfalls in the Sierras can be staggering and it became a constant struggle for the SP to keep the line open. 
This continuous battle with Mother Nature has not lessened with present owner Union Pacific.  Despite its operational difficulty the route is a vital artery in UP's system today.
Theodore D. Judah
The line eventually built through Donner Pass was the vision of Theodore D. Judah, an accomplished engineer who surveyed a manageable grade over the Sierra-Nevada range running 115 miles from Sacramento to the Nevada state line.
He lobbied for the project as early as 1859 but was ultimately pushed out by the "Big Four" of Collis P Huntington, Charles Crocker, Leland Stanford, and Mark Hopkins.
Ironically, their Central Pacific ultimately used much of Judah's work and included a total of 15 tunnels blasted out of granite by hand.  The Southern Pacific has a whole host of renowned achievements it is credited with, far too many to feature here.
However, its three important main lines continue as important arteries under Union Pacific today; the Overland Route (San Francisco-Chicago), Golden State Route (Southwest-Kansas City), and Sunset Route (Pacific Coast-Gulf Coast).
Southern Pacific FP7's have the Pacific Locomotive Association's "Truckee Limited" excursion, the last operated prior to Amtrak, at Long Ravine, California on April 25, 1971. Drew Jacksich photo.
The railroad also had numerous famous passenger trains bedecked in its celebrated “Daylight” livery.  Many of its trains shared the same name as its paint scheme, Daylights.
These include such names as:
·     Coast Daylight
·     Sacramento Daylight
·     San Joaquin Daylight
·     Shasta Daylight
Other notable trains included the Lark, Sunset Limited (still operated by Amtrak), Starlight, San Francisco Overland, City of San Francisco, and the Golden State Limited just to name a few.
While the idea of "Transcontinental Railroad" was authorized in 1862 by Congress, the Central Pacific Railroad was tasked with building the most difficult section; crossing the Sierra Nevadas through eastern California.
574839200244248690.jpg
What appears to be a Southern Pacific "Tunnel Motor" is ahead of an Amtrak consist led by SDP40F's at snowbound Truckee, California in February of 1975. Drew Jacksich photo.
Construction
The Central Pacific began construction in late October, 1863 from Sacramento, California heading east. By September 1, 1865 the CP had completed its line to Colfax along the western edge of the Sierra Nevada range, a distance of about 53 rail miles (according to SP's timetable).
However, surveying and construction through the mountains became much more difficult as there were no roads, or even trails, crews were literally carving a new transportation artery as they went. In doing so they were forced to climb and scale sheer rock faces.
Southern Pacific "Extra 6417," led by F7A #6417, heads west past the cook house as it exits from the snow shed at Norden, California along Donner Pass on January 27, 1967. Referred to as "The Car" by SP employees, the cook house burned down less than a month after this photo was taken. Tom Gildersleeve photo. Author's collection.
It took the Central Pacific, led by chief assistant engineer, Lewis Clement, more than three years to span the Sierras.  The line finally reached "Summit," just west of Truckee (covering a distance of just 65 rail miles) in 1867, with a grade averaging around 2.5%. The line itself did not open until December 13th and included a total of 15 tunnels and numerous snow sheds. 
Southern Pacific GP38-2 #4840 and a mate pause next to the depot in Truckee, California with a flanger during January of 1990; the consist will soon make another run over Donner Pass. Drew Jacksich photo.
Operation
Soon after the CP began operations it was acquired by Huntington's Southern Pacific in 1885. In the 1920s SP opened a new line over the Sierra Nevada, which became known as "Track #2."
This line featured a grade between just 1.3% and 2.4%, prompting SP to eventually abandon Track #1 in 1993 to reduce maintenance and operating costs.  Today, this route's right-of-way is still easily visible, as are the original tunnels.  
Not surprisingly, Donner Pass proved an operating headache with its many tunnels, snow sheds, unpredictable weather, and stiff grades.  For railfans who could reach the area during fierce winter storms it offered an amazing spectacle of rotaries battling the weather to keep the line open.
Southern Pacific SD45 #8890 and several FP7's have Amtrak's "Reno Fun Train" traversing Donner Pass at Yuba Gap, California in April of 1972. Drew Jacksich photo.
This line is where the SP developed its most unique steam locomotive the unique 2-8-8-2 "Cab Forward."  The locomotive looks much like it’s backward and facing the wrong direction but this design was very deliberate and its purpose was to keep train crews away from the thick smoke and dangerous gases that would build up in the numerous tunnels and snow sheds. 
Map
 
With the development of diesels, SP regularly employed six-axle, C-C designs for maximum tractive effort, usually EMD designs like SD40T-2s and SD45T-2s.   Today, the battle with Mother Nature continues with current owner Union Pacific and almost surely will remain so as long as the line remains open. 

Tunnels
Tunnel #1:  Located at Grizzly Hill, 514.7 feet in length. The bore was widened in 1913 to support double-tracking.
Tunnel #2 (Daylighted):  Situated about 1 mile east of Emigrant Gap, this bore was 271 feet in length; daylighted 1923-1924.
Tunnel #3:  This bore is at Milepost 180.7 near Cisco.  When originally built it was 280 feet in length.
Tunnel #4:  Very near Tunnel #3 at Milepost 181, it was originally 92 feet in length.
Tunnel #5 (Daylighted):  Located only four miles west of Tunnel #4 at Milepost 185, it was 128 feet in length; daylighted in 1895.
Tunnel #6 (Bypassed):  The famous bore in the Sierras also known as "Summit Tunnel" it was 1,659 feet in length.  The structure was bypassed in 1997.
Tunnel #7 (Abandoned):  Situated at Milepost 194.1 it is 100 feet in length; later daylighted and then covered with a snowshed before being abandoned.
Tunnel #8 (Bypassed):  This structure sits at Milepost 194.3 near Black Point.  It is 375 feet in length and is no longer in service.
Tunnel #9 (Bypassed):  This bore is located at Milepost 194.9 and is 216 feet in length; now abandoned.
Tunnel #10 (Bypassed):This tunnel is at Milepost 195.1 and is 509 feet in length; now abandoned.
Tunnel #11 (Bypassed):   Based at Milepost 195.4 it is 577 feet in length, now abandoned.
Tunnel #12 (Bypassed): At Milepost 195.7 it is only a mile west of Tunnel #11; the structure is 342 feet in length and is now abandoned.
Tunnel #13:  Situated at Milepost 200.1 near Andover it is the second-longest at 870 feet in length.
Tunnel #14 (Bypassed):  Located at Milepost 222 it is 200 feet in length and was bypassed following a line change in 1913.
Tunnel #15 (Daylighted): Located at milepost 225 (Quartz Spur); originally 96 feet in length.  The bore was daylighted in 1895 and the grade was abandoned in 1913 following a line change.

 
Amtrak's westbound "Reno Fun Train" is led by a parade of "covered wagons" as it rolls across the west side of Donner Pass at Gold Run, California in February, 1975. Drew Jacksich photo.
Today
Currently operations with what modern-day locomotives, many of which are General Electric-built, are not nearly as exciting as watching Cab Forwards conquer the pass although they are certainly much more economical and provide the railroad with a tremendous savings in operating costs.  
The issues poised by snow will always remain and as a result will always require the use of multiple snowsheds for more fluid operations.  
If you would like to see the pass in action today, it is much easier to access than during the pre-Interstate era; simply take Interstate 80 anywhere between Colfax and Truckee, California as it closely parallels the line all across the mountain.
Contents

Cheers!!

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

  • Member since
    February 2018
  • From: Flyover Country
  • 5,407 posts
Posted by York1 on Sunday, March 3, 2024 6:45 AM

Good morning, everyone.  It's donut day, so just coffee this morning.

A busy Sunday today.  I'll check in this evening.  I love the Donner Pass photos and video, Dave and Ed.

 

Near Keddie, CA., over Clear Creek:

 

 Over Clear Creek by Patrick Dirden, on Flickr

York1 John       

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: 4610 Metre's North of the Fortyninth on the left coast of Canada
  • 9,229 posts
Posted by BATMAN on Sunday, March 3, 2024 11:28 AM

ROBERT PETRICK
You guys are an inspiration.

Thank you, Richard, that is always nice to hear. Keep up the good work it is always worth it. I have quite a few friends and family who have made that lifestyle change and they have been able to go off some or all their medications, however, the biggest change for many of them was packing up the C-Pap and putting it in the closet.

Ed, that snow-clearing video was great. I could be quite happy doing a job like that just for where you get to work. I did consider going to work for the RR around 1980 but when I found out how the work schedule worked, it was not an option with the other things I had going on. I also went for several interviews with the Air Force and sat for a three-hour exam. But the Military is your life if you go that route and again I would have had to give up too much. They kept calling me back for the next two years to see if I was still interested in flying for them, I guess they were desperate.Laugh

Pretty good money driving trains up here, I don't know why so many on these forums complain about having no money for things while the railroads are screaming for people.

https://www.glassdoor.ca/Salary/CPKC-Locomotive-Engineer-Salaries-E13514_D_KO5,24.htm 

I coached hockey for years and when some of these kids became adults they were a little lost as to what to do with themselves. I would suggest the RRs and a handful of them are doing quite well now.

This new railroader is from Ukraine, he is a hoot.

Nothin is planned for today so the train room it is until the Canucks game.

All the best to all.

 

 

Brent

"All of the world's problems are the result of the difference between how we think and how the world works."

  • Member since
    February 2008
  • 8,675 posts
Posted by maxman on Sunday, March 3, 2024 3:05 PM

gmpullman

On Donner... On Blitzen!

They make it look so easy —

Cheers, Ed

 

Have seen this before.

What I'm curious about is that around the 8 minute mark the engineer/operator periodically toots the horn and someone can be heard responding "loud and clear".

 

What might that be all about?

  • Member since
    August 2003
  • From: Collinwood, Ohio, USA
  • 16,223 posts
Posted by gmpullman on Sunday, March 3, 2024 5:16 PM

maxman
What might that be all about?

Just a wild guess here but maybe, as they approach the crossing the plow operator makes a few 'test toots' (that's a technical term) to be sure the bells of the horns aren't clogged with ice? 

There's probably several RR employees at the crossing, too, and they may be signalling that the crossing is clear (no approaching vehicles) so a full-on grade crossing 'blow' isn't necessary.

I can see the drone hoovering in the background as the plow is approaching.

Regards, Ed

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