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? re: Size of capacitor for pass. car lighting

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  • Member since
    July 2002
  • From: US
  • 17 posts
Posted by ICOrange on Saturday, February 16, 2008 4:30 PM

I am currently working with IHC Smoothside passenger cars, interiors, and lighting kits and I would like to wire in an appropriate capacitor to eliminate flickering.

Does anyone have any suggestions as to size and type of capacitor to use?

thanks in advance! 

 

 

  • Member since
    July 2003
  • From: Sierra Vista, Arizona
  • 13,757 posts
Posted by cacole on Saturday, February 16, 2008 7:29 PM

It should be a non-polarized electrolytic capacitor of at least 50 Volts rating at the highest microfarad you can squeeze into the available space, without being obvious.

Non-polarized electrolytics are sometimes hard to find, so I sometimes use a small bridge rectifier so a normal polarized electrolytic can be used.

One source of non-polarized electrolytics is All Electronics in Van Nuys, California; but unless you intend to order several other items the postage can be a killer ($7.00 minimum).

I doubt if Radio Shack carries such items, since they seem to be getting away from electronics components and stocking only fast-selling cell phones and similar gadgets.

A disc ceramic capacitor is smaller, but won't hold a charge long enough for use in lighting circuits.

  • Member since
    December 2005
  • From: East Granby, CT, USA
  • 505 posts
Posted by jim22 on Saturday, February 16, 2008 8:17 PM
 danoreq27 wrote:

Does anyone have any suggestions as to size and type of capacitor to use?

Is this DC or DCC?  DC: the above suggestion is good.  DCC: I think you will be forced to build a power supply in the coach.  A diode or  diode bridge to create single-polarity power, a capacitor to take out the ripple, and probably a resistor to limit inrush. The starting point for the design would be the amount of current the lamps will take.

Jim 

  • Member since
    July 2002
  • From: US
  • 17 posts
Posted by ICOrange on Monday, February 18, 2008 3:45 PM

Yes, it's DC.  Thank you both for your responses.

 dan.

  • Member since
    December 2001
  • From: Pennsylvania
  • 709 posts
Posted by nedthomas on Monday, February 18, 2008 5:09 PM

You can make non-polarized electrolytics by connecting two in series.

- cap + + cap -   or  + cap -- cap +

 The value is reduced by 1/2 (using the same value) i.e. 2  100 uf in series = 50 uf

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