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Caboose to Engineer communication

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  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, September 24, 2003 11:37 PM
In regards to cabooses I have worked on (volunteer), rode on, and otherwise been on there are multiple answers to what you have questioned. As previously stated many cabooses did use a whistle connected tied directly onto the air line for limited communications. In addition some would have an air brake valve as others have stated. Although in most cases I would presume all the conductor need do is set the brakes until the engineer up front would take notice and make the proper release. Both crews would always be paying close attention to the train so more than likely a head end would see any defects on shorter trains. From the head end communication was no problem as period rulebook chapters on whistle signals attest. But the problem still existed until the development of radio.
Tim Sheffield
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, September 24, 2003 11:37 PM
In regards to cabooses I have worked on (volunteer), rode on, and otherwise been on there are multiple answers to what you have questioned. As previously stated many cabooses did use a whistle connected tied directly onto the air line for limited communications. In addition some would have an air brake valve as others have stated. Although in most cases I would presume all the conductor need do is set the brakes until the engineer up front would take notice and make the proper release. Both crews would always be paying close attention to the train so more than likely a head end would see any defects on shorter trains. From the head end communication was no problem as period rulebook chapters on whistle signals attest. But the problem still existed until the development of radio.
Tim Sheffield
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: US
  • 1,522 posts
Posted by AltonFan on Monday, September 29, 2003 7:17 PM
I seem to remember that some older Santa Fe cabeese had a semphore-like device for caboose to locomotive communication.

Dan

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: US
  • 1,522 posts
Posted by AltonFan on Monday, September 29, 2003 7:17 PM
I seem to remember that some older Santa Fe cabeese had a semphore-like device for caboose to locomotive communication.

Dan

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, October 1, 2003 2:25 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by Avondaleguy

This thread took off!

Now, I'm not only informed, I am hungry...


[:D]
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, October 1, 2003 2:25 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by Avondaleguy

This thread took off!

Now, I'm not only informed, I am hungry...


[:D]
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, October 3, 2003 12:51 PM
ATSF SEMAPHORES
The signal was infact a large disc in the order of 12" diam abd was mounted on the upright wall of the cupola and moved in an arc at an angle of 90 degrees fto the lenght of the train. The conductor moved it in different ways to indicate different meanings.

Other railroads inlater days, used automobile type air-horns and auto batteries for power to comunicate with long short and crow blasts. A crow is the noise a rooster makes and it derived from our limey cousins across the pond. Laterly somerailroads used two way radios to comunicate between caboose and engine. Some conductors used cartriges that burnt with different colored smoke to indicate a communication during the day and colored lamps at night. There are so amy different ways of comunicating an article in Trains or Model Railroader is what we need to find it all out. How about it Andy?
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, October 3, 2003 12:51 PM
ATSF SEMAPHORES
The signal was infact a large disc in the order of 12" diam abd was mounted on the upright wall of the cupola and moved in an arc at an angle of 90 degrees fto the lenght of the train. The conductor moved it in different ways to indicate different meanings.

Other railroads inlater days, used automobile type air-horns and auto batteries for power to comunicate with long short and crow blasts. A crow is the noise a rooster makes and it derived from our limey cousins across the pond. Laterly somerailroads used two way radios to comunicate between caboose and engine. Some conductors used cartriges that burnt with different colored smoke to indicate a communication during the day and colored lamps at night. There are so amy different ways of comunicating an article in Trains or Model Railroader is what we need to find it all out. How about it Andy?

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