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Double-Stack container cars

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Double-Stack container cars
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, September 10, 2003 9:59 AM
I'm in the process of sorting out some container loads for my various double-stack vehicles, and I'm wondering if there's any rules regarding what can be loaded where (for example, can you load a 53' container on top of 2 20' ones? I've never seen this in a photo).
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Double-Stack container cars
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, September 10, 2003 9:59 AM
I'm in the process of sorting out some container loads for my various double-stack vehicles, and I'm wondering if there's any rules regarding what can be loaded where (for example, can you load a 53' container on top of 2 20' ones? I've never seen this in a photo).
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: US
  • 1,522 posts
Posted by AltonFan on Thursday, September 11, 2003 12:14 PM
I think I have observed long containers stacked on two short, and even long containers stacked on top of shorter ones. Next time I get stopped by a double stack I'll try to pay more attention.

Dan

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  • From: US
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Posted by AltonFan on Thursday, September 11, 2003 12:14 PM
I think I have observed long containers stacked on two short, and even long containers stacked on top of shorter ones. Next time I get stopped by a double stack I'll try to pay more attention.

Dan

  • Member since
    July 2002
  • From: Centerville, Ohio
  • 90 posts
Posted by OhioRailroader on Thursday, September 11, 2003 12:27 PM
After looking through my photos, (which compared to most are very few, lol) out of about 200 I only have about 5 intermodal pics. And the only double stack pic has a 48' on top of a 45', so not much help there I guess. But if I remember right, on my trip to Alabama this summer, I saw some doubles with the 2 smaller containers under a 48' or 53'.

I too will have to pay attention more and bring my camera lol. Where I'm going to college is right next to CSX and NS tracks so I'll have something to do between classes lol.
John McManaman Ohio Valley Free-mo Website - http://www.trainweb.org/ohiovalleyfreemo Ohio Valley Free-mo Forum - http://ovfm.ipbfree.com
  • Member since
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  • From: Centerville, Ohio
  • 90 posts
Posted by OhioRailroader on Thursday, September 11, 2003 12:27 PM
After looking through my photos, (which compared to most are very few, lol) out of about 200 I only have about 5 intermodal pics. And the only double stack pic has a 48' on top of a 45', so not much help there I guess. But if I remember right, on my trip to Alabama this summer, I saw some doubles with the 2 smaller containers under a 48' or 53'.

I too will have to pay attention more and bring my camera lol. Where I'm going to college is right next to CSX and NS tracks so I'll have something to do between classes lol.
John McManaman Ohio Valley Free-mo Website - http://www.trainweb.org/ohiovalleyfreemo Ohio Valley Free-mo Forum - http://ovfm.ipbfree.com
  • Member since
    March 2002
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Posted by DTomajko on Thursday, September 11, 2003 1:12 PM
Yes,you can load a 53' container on two 20' containers.The only restrictions on container position is which ones are empty or loaded and if there is enough clearence for 53 footers on top.The 40' /5-pack bucket cars won't have enough clearence for five 53 footers on top,but three could be loaded,(end & middle buckets).Also,per NS rules,(I can't speak for any other railroad),loaded containers aren't placed on top of emptys,no matter the size.Also,JB Hunt early 53' boxes have no openings in the top of the stacking posts and are never on the bottom of a stack,while the newest 53's are of the wide-pick type and can be placed on the bottom.Also,NS requires that there will be not more than one empty hitch or well between loaded wells or platforms to make a car legal,ie;3 trailers or containers minumum on a 5-pack,(ends & middle).They also prefer that all lower wells be filled before stacking on top and then the previous rule applies again.Also,there are always two 20' boxes per well even if nothing is on top of them and twenties are always on the bottom,never on top.I also know that most of these rules are regularly disregarded,as I have photographic proof,I only know that in Pittsburgh these rules are strictly followed.By the way,one other piece of intermodal trivia,on a 89' flatcar,a single trailer is always loaded facing the brakewheel end of the car.I hope this helped,good luck and good modeling.
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Posted by DTomajko on Thursday, September 11, 2003 1:12 PM
Yes,you can load a 53' container on two 20' containers.The only restrictions on container position is which ones are empty or loaded and if there is enough clearence for 53 footers on top.The 40' /5-pack bucket cars won't have enough clearence for five 53 footers on top,but three could be loaded,(end & middle buckets).Also,per NS rules,(I can't speak for any other railroad),loaded containers aren't placed on top of emptys,no matter the size.Also,JB Hunt early 53' boxes have no openings in the top of the stacking posts and are never on the bottom of a stack,while the newest 53's are of the wide-pick type and can be placed on the bottom.Also,NS requires that there will be not more than one empty hitch or well between loaded wells or platforms to make a car legal,ie;3 trailers or containers minumum on a 5-pack,(ends & middle).They also prefer that all lower wells be filled before stacking on top and then the previous rule applies again.Also,there are always two 20' boxes per well even if nothing is on top of them and twenties are always on the bottom,never on top.I also know that most of these rules are regularly disregarded,as I have photographic proof,I only know that in Pittsburgh these rules are strictly followed.By the way,one other piece of intermodal trivia,on a 89' flatcar,a single trailer is always loaded facing the brakewheel end of the car.I hope this helped,good luck and good modeling.
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, September 11, 2003 1:26 PM
We get intermodals through town on the BNSF everyday and DTomajko above is correct. They always run the smaller container (s) on the bottom with the big one on top. You even see 48 and 45 with 53 on top. I have a movie I shot this summer that I just watched and I noticed that they appear to try and stack the same sizes on top of each other. It contained 3 parts of a 5 pack with 2 20s and a 53 on top. I would send you a picture, but all I have is a 320X240 mpg and the freeze frames are terrible.
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, September 11, 2003 1:26 PM
We get intermodals through town on the BNSF everyday and DTomajko above is correct. They always run the smaller container (s) on the bottom with the big one on top. You even see 48 and 45 with 53 on top. I have a movie I shot this summer that I just watched and I noticed that they appear to try and stack the same sizes on top of each other. It contained 3 parts of a 5 pack with 2 20s and a 53 on top. I would send you a picture, but all I have is a 320X240 mpg and the freeze frames are terrible.
  • Member since
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  • From: Guelph, Ont.
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Posted by BR60103 on Thursday, September 11, 2003 9:46 PM
Containers are reinforced at the ends, not in the middle. Thus, you can put a 40' container on 2 20', but a 20' on a 40' would make a dent in the middle.
Some of the loner than 40' containers have extra reinforcing at the 40' mark so that the can sit on the 40'ers in a stack, and possibly the 40' could sit on them. Look at the models and see.

--David

  • Member since
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  • From: Guelph, Ont.
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Posted by BR60103 on Thursday, September 11, 2003 9:46 PM
Containers are reinforced at the ends, not in the middle. Thus, you can put a 40' container on 2 20', but a 20' on a 40' would make a dent in the middle.
Some of the loner than 40' containers have extra reinforcing at the 40' mark so that the can sit on the 40'ers in a stack, and possibly the 40' could sit on them. Look at the models and see.

--David

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, September 11, 2003 11:22 PM
Although it is extremely rare, I do recall a couple of occasions when a 45' container was stacked on top of a 48' container. If memory serves me right, there was only one arrangment like this in the entire train.

Josh Ziegler
Spokane, WA
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, September 11, 2003 11:22 PM
Although it is extremely rare, I do recall a couple of occasions when a 45' container was stacked on top of a 48' container. If memory serves me right, there was only one arrangment like this in the entire train.

Josh Ziegler
Spokane, WA
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, September 13, 2003 11:43 AM
As a general rule, you can stack larger containers on top of smaller ones, but not smaller ones on top of larger ones. 20s can only be stacked on other 20s.
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Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, September 13, 2003 11:43 AM
As a general rule, you can stack larger containers on top of smaller ones, but not smaller ones on top of larger ones. 20s can only be stacked on other 20s.
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Posted by Anonymous on Monday, September 15, 2003 9:59 AM
Thanks for the advice, I'll bear this in mind when I get around to building my next double-stack set - the one I've completed fits the rules listed here. I've found it to be a good idea to cut a piece of lead sheet to go in each of the containers on the bottom deck - this stops wobbling and avoids derailments on tighter curves.
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Posted by Anonymous on Monday, September 15, 2003 9:59 AM
Thanks for the advice, I'll bear this in mind when I get around to building my next double-stack set - the one I've completed fits the rules listed here. I've found it to be a good idea to cut a piece of lead sheet to go in each of the containers on the bottom deck - this stops wobbling and avoids derailments on tighter curves.

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