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Smokestacks

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  • Member since
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  • From: Harrisburg, PA
  • 522 posts
Smokestacks
Posted by hbgatsf on Monday, January 23, 2023 7:12 AM

This is a picture of a steam generating plant in Pittsburgh.

The smokestack on the left was built in 1907.  Here is something of a close up:

It would appear that there are metal straps around it to add strength.  I don't remember ever seeing this before.  Any idea if this method was common?  I believe it is brick, so maybe the straps were added sometime after it was built.  It is unknown when the other smokestack was built but it obviously does not have those straps.

On both there is a platform partially up.  What is the purpose of those and why in that location?

 

Rick

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Posted by dehusman on Monday, January 23, 2023 7:33 AM

Straps : Adding straps to things for reinforcement was common reinforcement method, no idea how many chimneys had issues that they needed reinforcing.

Platforms :  Platforms appear to be new, my guess would be emissions monitoring equipment has been installed in the stacks and the platforms give access to the equipment.

Dave H. Painted side goes up. My website : wnbranch.com

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Posted by NorthBrit on Monday, January 23, 2023 8:26 AM

To follow up on Dave H's answer.

 

Steel banding is often done on factory chimneys to prevent or stop cracks from progressing caused by any of following.

 

  1. Winds that rock a chimney continuously.
  2. Constant moisture from rain and condensation.
  3. Annual freezing weather.
  4. Accumulations of sulfuric and other acids that eat through concrete.
  5. Fluctuations in temperature
  6. Spent fuels soaking into the chimney liner or column.
  7. Different size explosions from improbably run boilers from runaway gases.
  8. Different size seismic activities.
  9. Lighting which has been known to suddenly create substantial cracking down the column.

 

The platforms are generally for maintenance purposes; as Dave says having access to any equipment etc. used.

 

David

To the world you are someone.    To someone you are the world

I cannot afford the luxury of a negative thought

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Posted by Remeyer53 on Monday, January 23, 2023 9:29 AM

The banding looks very similar to the banding that is often seen on concrete farm silos because of the preassure from the contents. As was said above there are a lot of other sources of stress on concrete. Concrete by itself does not have good tensile strenght (stetching).

  • Member since
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  • From: Collinwood, Ohio, USA
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Posted by gmpullman on Monday, January 23, 2023 3:55 PM

The GE plant I worked in had a stack with steel banding.

 Cleveland Wire Smoke Stack by Edmund, on Flickr

The stack was dismantled in 1973:

 CWW_1_2013_0005 by Edmund, on Flickr

Ironic that you show that very steam plant as it was recently a subject in another forum concerning the elevated trackage and associated doorway leading directly into the plant. Someone in the industry had commented that you would 'never' see coal unloaded directly inside the plant.

Good Luck, Ed

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Posted by BigDaddy on Monday, January 23, 2023 4:18 PM

This is a 1829 cotton mill smoke stack.  They didn't build it round and they didn't use bands.

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

Shenandoah Valley

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Posted by crossthedog on Monday, January 23, 2023 5:12 PM

The old stack in Mt. Vernon, Washington, complete with metal bands:

Returning to model railroading after 40 years and taking unconscionable liberties with the SP&S, Northern Pacific and Great Northern roads in the '40s and '50s.

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Posted by gmpullman on Monday, January 23, 2023 6:24 PM

A few years ago I stumbled across a series of videos featuring this Fred Dibnah fellow. A steeplejack and chimney wrecker.

Here's an example:

I was amazed at some of his other videos on how to rig a ladder to the side of the stack. I'm not particularly in fear of heights but watching what this fellow used to do was, at times, a knucklebiter!

 

Cheers, Ed

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Posted by BigDaddy on Monday, January 23, 2023 6:31 PM

That calls for a Mike Cross song.  Dear Boss

https://youtu.be/CV8P59qAxSM

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

Shenandoah Valley

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Posted by hbgatsf on Tuesday, January 24, 2023 6:56 AM

gmpullman

 

Ironic that you show that very steam plant as it was recently a subject in another forum concerning the elevated trackage and associated doorway leading directly into the plant. Someone in the industry had commented that you would 'never' see coal unloaded directly inside the plant.

Good Luck, Ed

 

No mystery there.  That was my thread, and when it was mentioned I went looking for pictures of The Cloud Factory.  The smokestacks raised my curiosity.

Rick

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Posted by selector on Tuesday, January 24, 2023 11:52 AM

The famous Sudbury 'super-stack' stands/stood 1250' tall and is not banded.  You can do an image search and see its immensity. It was the tallest chimney in the world for a number of years until the Kazahks built one taller.

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Posted by NorthBrit on Tuesday, January 24, 2023 12:10 PM

selector

The famous Sudbury 'super-stack' stands/stood 1250' tall and is not banded.  

 

In a lot of cases it depends on the types of brick used  in building the stacks.

Here in the U.K.  majority ( around 98%) of stacks made from bricks from The Leeds Brick Company  were/are not banded.  Brick companies in the Midlands generally had/have stacks banded.

 

David

To the world you are someone.    To someone you are the world

I cannot afford the luxury of a negative thought

  • Member since
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  • From: Vancouver Island, BC
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Posted by selector on Sunday, January 29, 2023 12:49 PM

I don't think the Sudbury stack was erected with bricks, but with reinforced concrete.  At least, its facade would suggest as much.

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Posted by maxman on Tuesday, January 31, 2023 10:44 AM

hbgatsf

 

 
gmpullman

 

Ironic that you show that very steam plant as it was recently a subject in another forum concerning the elevated trackage and associated doorway leading directly into the plant. Someone in the industry had commented that you would 'never' see coal unloaded directly inside the plant.

Good Luck, Ed

 

 

 

No mystery there.  That was my thread, and when it was mentioned I went looking for pictures of The Cloud Factory.  The smokestacks raised my curiosity.

 

Hey, I resemble that remark.  My assumption was originally that we were talking about a power generating station. not a steam generating station.  I had said that I had never seen a power generating station where coal was unloaded inside the building, and that the spur going into the building was for the unloading/loading of turbime/generator or other items using the turbine building overhead crane.

Until someone definitely shows me a picture of something different, I will continue to believe that my comment was correct.

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