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What is Texture Paint?

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  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, November 20, 2003 7:41 PM
I noticed the other day that there are additives for regular latex paints that give it a sand-textured appearance, and I started thinking about the modeling possibilities of this. The stuff comes in bags and is cheaper than an equal quantity of packaged "ballast" by model suppliers, but I think it is only white in color (it takes on whatever color of paint that you add it into). I would bet that one could create a home-brew of the above-mentioned "Texture Paint" by mixing this granular material into regular joint compound, perhaps thinning a bit with water, and maybe throwing in some earth-toned latex paint for good measure. All of this is available at Home Depot (model railroads shop at the Depot, right, not at Lowe's?).
  • Member since
    June 2003
  • From: Culpeper, Va
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Posted by IRONROOSTER on Wednesday, November 19, 2003 6:06 AM
This sounds kind of like joint compound in the powder form. Keep us posted on any results you find for this miracle stuff.
Enjoy
Paul
If you're having fun, you're doing it the right way.
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: US
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Posted by jfrank138 on Wednesday, November 19, 2003 3:25 AM
Thanks, Dave . . .
But I don't think that is what Ellison was referring to.
Here is some of what he said in a Model Railroader article in the January 1951 issue:
"...the plaster known under its trade name as 'Texture Paint' is a superior material for landscape work....U.S. Gypsum Co., Wesco Calcimine Co. and other manufacturers market it for a 'Craftex' finish over gypsum wallboard....Here are some of its superior qualities: 1) It is a fine, pure white powder that, when mixed with water, produces a lightweight, grainless, dull soft-textured appearance that looks and feels remarkably like soil. 2) It has no out-of-scale grain such as sand....4)....Its white, grainless surface takes water color and oil paints in one coat....5) It takes two days to harden, which gives plenty of time to work in many fine details. 6) Within reasonable limits, the plaster can be bent to reshape contours without cracking."
A google search yielded several products called "Texture Paint" but I am not at all sure any of them is the same stuff Ellison was referring to.
John
  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: Omaha, NE
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Posted by dehusman on Tuesday, November 18, 2003 9:34 PM
Latex paint with a grit in it. El cheapo would be latex pain mixed with sand, gives a rough texture to what you paint, rather than a flat smooth surface. the alternative is to paint with latex paint and then sprinkle sand/dirt/ground foam over the wet paint.

Dave H.

Dave H. Painted side goes up. My website : wnbranch.com

  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: US
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What is Texture Paint?
Posted by jfrank138 on Tuesday, November 18, 2003 9:05 PM
My hobby hero, the late Frank C. Ellison who built the landmark Delta Lines in the 1930s, 1940s and early 1950s, swore by a plaster called "Texture Paint" for producing scenery (he poured it over wire screening). He liked its absence of out-of-scale graininess, its ability to absorb color (he used artists tube oils diluted with turpentine), its 2-days workability, its flexibility and its low cost.
Is it the same as the U.S. Gypsum product called Texture Paint that is available today for spraying on ceilings?
John

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