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Benchwork

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  • Member since
    April 2003
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Benchwork
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, November 11, 2003 2:32 PM
In deciding on what to do about benchwork, I can across the following site:

http://www.sieversbenchwork.com/Index.html

Looks very promissing and pretty resonably priced. As I'm not much in the carpentry department (I can do it, it just won't be pretty ) This looks to be relativily easy to put together, expand, and layout in various arrangements.

Now mind you, this may seem like it might be more than just rushing out to the hardware store and buying all the materials, but factor in the cost of the table saw, the drill and bits and various other tools you'd need to build it and it seems to come in better.

This seem to also be a good item for those that are in a place with limited space and can't have the power equipment around. It also seems to break down easy for transportation, if you need to move it about.

So I was wondering, has anyone used it, and if so how do you like it compared to standard construction benchworks.
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Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, November 11, 2003 4:20 PM
A good friend was able to fill his basement with Sievers benchwork in the space of a few weeks. If you don't like carpentry, aren't very good at it, don't have the necessary tools or are just impatient to get things moving faster, it's a great way to go.

John
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Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, November 11, 2003 9:13 PM
ah, was wondering, seems good, but the legs are pretty expensive compared to the tops. so if you got 1 top, for around $40-50, you'd spend another $40-45 for the legs ( $20 per end).

slight imbalance in the costs, but i guess that's how they make up for it.

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  • From: Culpeper, Va
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Posted by IRONROOSTER on Wednesday, November 12, 2003 5:39 AM
After the first module I would think you would need only one set of legs per module. You could attach the second to the first (third to second etc) at one end saving a set of legs. That would help keep the cost down. Also, you may have a local wood workers club or county rec facility where you can use the power tools for a small cost to make your own. But if you're really uncomfortable with the tools or lack the time, then this looks like a good way to go. Hobby time is short, concentrate on the fun parts.
Enjoy
Paul
If you're having fun, you're doing it the right way.
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, November 13, 2003 4:34 PM
manufactured b-work will always cost more than making it yourself; probably more than hiring in an experienced woodworker at or just below cabinetmaker grade. So wherever you are, cost compare the major alternates -including shipping if it applies- before you plung in.
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, November 13, 2003 8:51 PM
FWIW, I'm the last person that could be considered a wood butcher and I was able to plan and build my benchwork modules. I looked at that website you posted and it looks like you still do all the work to assemble your benchwork, except for the measuring and cutting. Doesn't seem like much of a savings to me.

Jas
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, November 13, 2003 9:09 PM
I'm with Jason on this one. Benchwork looks intimidating, but is much easier than you can imagine. The last thing I built before I did my benchwork was a bird house when I was in grade six in 1960 when I was a boy scout. The judge had to ask me what it was and that was the end of my wood working career.

Remember there is only one really important requirement for benchwork and once you have master this idea, you can build anything. The primary purpose of benchwork is so your layout doesn't fall down. Now you can do open grid, or L girder (very easy to build), or you can have the flat plywood central, or cookie cutter layouts, or benchwork attached to the walls, or benchwork on top of kitchen cabinets, or on library shelves, or what have you. The only important part of the benchwork is that they remain standing.

You now know the fundamental secret of benchwork.
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, November 14, 2003 11:58 AM
invest in a good miterbox saw.it will be worth the investment around the house,as well as the railroad.al cuts can be made square,no one wants there bench work to floute.one lege on the floor the other,well,doing nothing.as far as having the exp.read your tape correctly .mesure twice cut once.if all else fails call your local carpenters local.they are a good bunch of guys and i think they will help you tremendously. good luck and happy railroading.lawtrain
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, November 14, 2003 2:13 PM
Hmm...Dunno, I could spend hours on end making sure the measurements are good, then spend a few hours at the hardware store getting the lumber cut to my measurements, then find all the ahrdware i'll need. then go home and drill holes in the lumber for the attaching hardware. put it all together and finally aftyer a long weekeend have some semblience of a Benchwork.

Or I could spend a few extra dollars and order a benchwork that's reconfigurable easily, includes all the required hardware and lumber cut exactly to size, spend a few hours putting it together when it arrives, and save myself a weekend of hell and keep me sane.

This isn't the only set up out there, I've seen a few pre-fab Benchworks, one was aluminum, others were wood, this just seemed like the most useful for Those of us that don't want to kill a weekend or a week building something that already exists.

it's also far cheaper than Mianne Benchwork (http://www.miannebenchwork.com/default.htm), and is more customizable for your layout.

Some of us aren't weekend carpenters, we've got busy lives, it;s not like 20 years ago when the weekend actually was a relaxing time. I barely get time to myself on the weekends now as is, and sure enough i'd rather be running a train than slaving over lumber in what little time i get.

Besides, if i added up the cost to buy the tools for carpentry work, the lumber needed to do this, all the hardware that would be needed, i bet it'd cost three times as much than to just purchase something that only needs a a Phillips-head screwdriver and 7/16" wrench.

So you see, it's actually better to buy it than to make it for me. for you older people that have time on your hands, you may see it differently, that's fine. but for me, i' looking for timesavers here, and this seems to be a very reasonably priced one.

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Posted by asrothzeid on Friday, November 14, 2003 5:34 PM
I live in an apartment building and I don't want to upset my neighbors with the sound of power tools, so buying a layout kit made sense. Did I also mention that I live in a one bedroom apartment and I don't own a car?

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