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" A Method Of Scenery Work"

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  • Member since
    December 2005
  • From: west of Portland Oreg.( the city of Roses
  • 599 posts
" A Method Of Scenery Work"
Posted by TrainsRMe1 on Thursday, March 2, 2023 2:21 PM

Hello All, Hope you are doing well,                                                                                 I want an opinion on this method of scenery work I saw on Youtube, this layout is built by Dave Kriuse the Union Pacifc Evanston Subdivision, the method he is using for his scenery base is painters paper, it seems to give you an idea what your scenery will look like, I would like to know what you think of this method, is it co$t effective and can you apply plaster cloth on the paper or do you mainly use Hydrocal & plaster of paris? currently I'm using the Wooland Scenics method with newspaper wads, enqiuring minds want to know' LOL,!!!         Hope to hear from you MRRDERS soon, take care!                                                                          Trainsrme1Cool                    

  • Member since
    February 2008
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Posted by kasskaboose on Thursday, March 2, 2023 2:58 PM

Is that route cheaper than using wet paint from HD or Lowes "oops" table in a brown/beige shade and sprinkling ground foam?  I use that approach and it works.  Something else to consider is visiting a club to see what others use.

  • Member since
    December 2015
  • From: Shenandoah Valley
  • 9,094 posts
Posted by BigDaddy on Thursday, March 2, 2023 4:02 PM

It seems to me Howard Zane used some sort of paper (red rosin?) for his layout.   I haven't seen him post in quite a while, I hope he is alright. 

I have used cardboard lattice and cheap paper towels dipped in hydrocal.  If your web of cardboard has holes that are too big, it shows as depressions.  That probably wouldn't happen with plaster cloth, but if you want to save money go with hydrocal and paper towels.

Plaster sticks to just about anything so I'm sure it would work with painters paper too. 

 EDIT I looked at the beginning of that video.  They use a cardboard web that has bigger opennings then cover it with paper.  Possible a little faster than my method and you don't have holes in the lattice to deal with.

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

Shenandoah Valley

  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: Canada, eh?
  • 13,375 posts
Posted by doctorwayne on Thursday, March 2, 2023 10:30 PM

For landforms, I used aluminum window screen over temporary pieces of upright scrap lumber, usually clamped or screwed to crossmembers of the layout's benchwork.  The screen is stapled to both the uprights and also to the edges of the cut-out 3/4" plywood which supports the track.

I then mix a batch of Durabond 90 patching plaster, and simply slather it over the screening, using both putty knives and gloved hands.  Regardless of how thick (or thin) the plaster might be, it usually sets in roughly the 90 minutes denoted by the number on the bag.  The uprights can then be removed and also disengaged from any plaster that might have oozed through the screen.
I then take a can of dirt-coloured latex house paint, dump some of it into a plastic bucket, add some clean water, then use a regular house-painters' wide brush to change the white patching plaster to a more dirt-like colour, which will later be covered with various scenic materials.

Here's some of the "dirt" scenery getting some trees and ground cover...

...and still a little more...

...and eventually enough undergrowth to hide much of the bridge...

The bare "ground" shown here...

...does need some ground cover, and maybe some fencing, too, especially if there are cattle destind to use that pasture land.

Here's a view of some partially-done landforms that yet have no trees or ground cover...

Here's a more complete scene...

...and another similar one...

In those last two pictures, the "water" was also done with Durabond 90, and it's stood well the test of time and has never been marred by friends who prefer to place their cameras atop the "water", in order to catch photos of the trains crossing on the bridges.

Wayne

  • Member since
    January 2019
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Posted by John-NYBW on Thursday, March 2, 2023 11:20 PM

I use a modified version of a technique Howard Zane described in MR years ago. I build a base by basket weaving cardboard strips and then cover it with red resin paper. As I recall, Howard covered the resin paper with white glue before adding ground cover. He used this for background scenes that didn't require as much strength as foreground scenery. Instead of white glue, I use powdered joint compound mixed with water on background scenes because it gives me a long working time. For foreground scenes that need added strength, I apply plaster of paris with a foam brush. I then paint it with earth colored latex paint and add scenery textures. The below photo shows several stages.

Since this is going to be a tree covered hillside, I'm not worried about the seams showing. 

  • Member since
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  • From: west coast
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Posted by rrebell on Friday, March 3, 2023 10:15 AM

I use cheap foam, anything you can get for free or scraps from your benchwork. I then cover this with plaster cloth, the cheap medical stuff. It can take a lot of weight without being damaged.

  • Member since
    December 2005
  • From: west of Portland Oreg.( the city of Roses
  • 599 posts
Posted by TrainsRMe1 on Friday, March 3, 2023 2:20 PM

That looks good John, could I also use masking or package or is it best to use Rosin paper??? 

  • Member since
    January 2019
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Posted by John-NYBW on Saturday, March 4, 2023 4:21 PM

TrainsRMe1

That looks good John, could I also use masking or package or is it best to use Rosin paper??? 

 

The red resin paper is heavy duty which gives it a little more strength but I think other strong paper would do. I'm guessing but Howard Zane might have figured since he was just using white glue to cover it as opposed to a plaster like material, he needed the added strength. In the article, I believe he said he only used it for background scenery. Maybe somebody with access to the archive could find the original article. I think it was in Model Railroader but I also read Railroad Model Craftsman and might have seen it there.

The red resin paper is intended for use on construction sights and its purpose is to protect flooring. That's why it has to be fairly durable. I forget what I paid for it but one roll is enough to last three lifetimes of model railroading. You can probably get it at any of the big box home improvement stores. 

  • Member since
    December 2005
  • From: west of Portland Oreg.( the city of Roses
  • 599 posts
Posted by TrainsRMe1 on Sunday, March 5, 2023 11:59 AM

Thanks John,                                                                                                          I'm thinking red rosin paper will be the choice, I have for the longest time had problems posting pictures on this site, so I'll give you a play by play, once I get started, 

  • Member since
    December 2015
  • From: Shenandoah Valley
  • 9,094 posts
Posted by BigDaddy on Monday, March 6, 2023 11:55 AM

Pictures you have to follow the directions in the Sticky Post.  You cannot improvise and use Google or Facebook.  I use Imgur to host photos, which is free.  There are others that work too.

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

Shenandoah Valley

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