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Ogden & Cache Valley RR - Layout Construction

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  • Member since
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  • From: Shenandoah Valley The Home Of Patsy Cline
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Posted by superbe on Saturday, July 4, 2015 5:49 PM

Based on the cleanliness of your garage (clean enough to eat off the floor) I'm sure your work bench and train room will be the same.

Thank goodness my wife won't see them.Big Smile

Bob

 

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Posted by BroadwayLion on Sunday, July 5, 2015 8:49 PM

superbe
Based on the cleanliness of your garage (clean enough to eat off the floor) I'm sure your work bench and train room will be the same.

 

Is brand new building just finished and built for the railroad.

ROAR

The Route of the Broadway Lion The Largest Subway Layout in North Dakota.

Here there be cats.                                LIONS with CAMERAS

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Posted by superbe on Monday, July 6, 2015 3:28 PM

Lion,

Thanks for the heads up, but I'm betting it will look the same 6 months from now.

Bob

 

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Posted by Geared Steam on Monday, July 6, 2015 6:01 PM

richhotrain

 

 
BroadwayLion

LION is very surprised that you could build such a room without electrical outlets every 6 - 10 feet as per requirement of the building code. Maybe Floridia has a different code.

 

 

Methinks LION needs glasses.  Me sees wall outlets every 6 feet or so on the finished walls.

 

Rich

 

Yes, what Rich said ^

"The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination."-Albert Einstein

http://gearedsteam.blogspot.com/

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Posted by Medina1128 on Thursday, July 9, 2015 11:07 AM

Wow! I'm totally envious of you! My layout is in our basement. If (or when) I ever buy my own place, it will already have an out-building for the layout. That's ONE of the advantages of living in the country, no HOAs to deal with.

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Posted by Dannyboy6 on Saturday, July 11, 2015 8:09 PM

That's a pretty cool project you have there! I've read the thread and enjoyed watching your meticulous approach, but the elephant in the corner is begging to come out...What's the cost of a project like this?

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Posted by tedtedderson on Sunday, July 12, 2015 8:22 AM

Dannyboy6

That's a pretty cool project you have there! I've read the thread and enjoyed watching your meticulous approach, but the elephant in the corner is begging to come out...What's the cost of a project like this?

 

The plumber came to my house and asked me the same question about my layout. Before I was done adding everything up I just told him "all of it". 

Then he asked how much time I spend on it. He got the same answer. 

T e d

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Posted by Onewolf on Sunday, July 12, 2015 8:25 AM

I started working on the benchwork for the model train layout on July 4th. I took a week off week in order to try and make significant progress on the basic benchwork. I made a lot of progress in the last week, but not as much as I had hoped. There was a whole lot of time spent figuring out how to transform an electronic design into a real world design.  Building the center platform alone also required me to construct some helper devices to deal with some of the larger components.

Here are views of the layout design:

The overall view



The lower level



The middle level



The upper level



Framing in the center platform "rooom within a room".



Building the floor joists. The center platform floor will be 30" above the room floor. In the background you can also see the 2" rigid foam (with foil back) insulation in the window openings.



I built the floor joists on 24" center to allow for lots of storage (plastic storage tubs) under the center platform.



The center platform floor is 23/32" tongue/groove and the walls are 1/2" sanded plywood.







One of the 'wings' for the upper level benchwork.



There is 6' 3.5" clearance under the upper level 'wings'.


The first open grid 1x4 benchwork assembly for the lower level.



The open grid benchwork assembly construction area.



I finally got around to building stairs up to the center platform.



Making progress on the lower level benchwork. The benchwork mounted on the center platform on the right is just temporarily mounted so I could see how wide the aisles will feel (the aisles are 48" +-2").



After one week of construction, this is the view entering the train room.

Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

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Posted by Onewolf on Sunday, July 12, 2015 8:39 AM

Dannyboy6

That's a pretty cool project you have there! I've read the thread and enjoyed watching your meticulous approach, but the elephant in the corner is begging to come out...What's the cost of a project like this?

 

The general contractor charged about $50/sq ft for the 'turnkey' detached garage/workshop. This included everything (permitting, air conditioning, full bathroom, etc etc) except new irrigation/landscaping and the new driveway  Grading/forming/pouring/finishing the new rebuilt driveway was about $15,000. 

The budget for the basic layout construction (benchwork, subroadbed, roadbed, track/turnouts/turnout control, DCC control, layout lighting, electrical, etc etc) is about $12,000. This does not include building the main division yard which will be another ~$4000 for track/turnout/turnout control/etc.

Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

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Posted by cheese3 on Sunday, July 12, 2015 10:12 AM

Looks awesome! There will definately be enough to keep you occupied for a while.

Adam Thompson Model Railroading is fun!

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Posted by Dannyboy6 on Sunday, July 12, 2015 8:41 PM

Thanks Onewolf. Retirement's about 4 yrs away for me and my best girl and I have been talking about doing this; thx for the info, and I'm sorry if my question offended.

Dan

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Posted by Onewolf on Sunday, July 19, 2015 4:29 PM

As expected this week was not as productive as the week I had off from work. Call it "The Revenge of the Honey-Do" week.

I installed L6-30 receptacles for the two 240v 30AMP circuits that had already been run to the workshop and this allowed me to fire up the 2HP 240v Grizzly dust collectors. I have started building a dust collection system with a vortex chip collector, a duct for my miter saw (which isn't very effective), and the floor sweeper duct. Next I will add a duct for the table saw.



I rebuilt my benchwork assembly table so it's taller, more sturdy, and more level. This allows me to produce better open grid benchwork assemblies.



I temporarily mounted some of the old layout benchwork assemblies to the center platform as a proof of concept to see what the three levels (42", 62", 82") sight lines would look like.



I also mounted a scrap piece of 1/8" hardboard to see how the coved corner backdrops for the center platform benchwork would work. It looks like the coved corners will work fine.



I also mounted a piece of scrap 5mm hardwood panel to the upper level benchwork to get a feel for what the 'wall' that drops from the ceiling and supports that outside of the upper level would eventually look like. Before the train room was drywalled I installed 2x6 blocking in the ceiling that the 'walls' that descend from the ceiling will mount to.



I also build and installed 4 more 1x4 open grid benchwork assemblies. I still need to add a bunch of wall strut supports for these new benchwork assemblies.





I will be continuing to focus mostly on building benchwork for the next month or two.

Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Wednesday, July 22, 2015 5:11 PM

richhotrain

 

 
BroadwayLion

LION is very surprised that you could build such a room without electrical outlets every 6 - 10 feet as per requirement of the building code. Maybe Floridia has a different code.

 

 

Methinks LION needs glasses.  Me sees wall outlets every 6 feet or so on the finished walls.

 

Rich

 

The room is well within NEC requirements for general living space - every 12 feet spacing, not more than 6 feet from any point along a wall to nearest outlet.

3 volt-amps pers square foot - so one 20A circuit can handle all the required outlets for 800 sq ft of space. A 15 amp circuit can handle 600 sq ft. This applies to general living areas, not special requirements of baths, kitchens and other uses.

Based on what I see, his two 20A circuits is well above the requirements of the NEC.

Sheldon
 

    

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Posted by tedtedderson on Wednesday, July 22, 2015 5:24 PM

I just added one of these to my Christmas list. Angel

T e d

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Posted by Onewolf on Monday, July 27, 2015 7:14 PM

Continuing to work on the lower level benchwork.  Along this wall is where the classification yard will be and the benchwork is 30" deep.

 

As we turn the corner here we start to get into the area that will contain the locomotive service terminal.

I hope to finish the basic lower level benchwork by the end of next weekend.

Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

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Posted by dasBM2-6-0 on Tuesday, July 28, 2015 3:08 AM

AMAZING work, Onewolf!!!Yes

MY entire HOUSE isn't built THAT well...and if I didn't do nearly constant upkeep...it wouldn't last as long as your layout will!!Big Smile

May your freight ALWAYS roll smoothly...and ON TIME!!

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Posted by Onewolf on Sunday, August 16, 2015 6:02 PM

Progress on the layout has been slow but steady.

I have started building the shelf for the 4 track staging (and 'offsite' passenger train service facility) that will be located in the model workshop.  At some point after the layout benchwork construction is completed I plan to go through the wall on the right and add a return loop in the woodshop/workshop. The return loop will be designed so it can lift up against the wall when it's not needed.

I wired and installed DPDT switches so the staging track can be selectively powered/controlled either by the 'main' layout DCC control or by the Zephyr in the model workshop. I also wired it so the closest track can function as a standalone DCC programming track.

I'm also working out the 'kinks' on how I plan to use 5630 SMD LED light strips to light the layout.

The view from the train room looking into the model workshop.

I have completed the lower level basic benchwork. I will be installing 5/8" plywood and 1/2" homasote in the yard and engine terminal areas and 5/8" plywood and 1" Foamular 150 (pink) ridgid foam in some of the other areas before I start to lay track.

The aisles seem nice and wide. Hopefully they will still seem nice and wide if/when I host operating sessions. :)

I mounted some supports and a piece of 1 1/2" right angle steel bracket across the aisle to simulate where the track will cross from the middle level (nolix) over to the upper level (center platform).

Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

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Posted by JEFFREY LESLIE on Sunday, August 23, 2015 8:31 AM

Incredible.

I have some questions about the carpet squares.

Did they come with any sort of padding backing?

If not, did you put any padding down?

What did you use to attach the squares to the concrete floor?

I'm wondering about moisture and bare concrete floor with carpet directly on it.

Thanks

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Posted by Onewolf on Sunday, August 23, 2015 4:05 PM

I am starting to work on the helix and upper return loop support structure.The helix will be double track with 37.5" and 40" radius tracks and will connect the lower level at 42" elevation to the middle level at 62" elevation. The helix will have 4.5 revolutions to climb the 20" elevation change. The upper level return loop will be at 82" elevation.

I wasn't sure exactly how I was going to build the support structure for the helix, but so far I'm happy with how it has turned out. I knew it was going to be one of the major challenges of converting a 'digital' plan into a real world structure that must deal with real world laws of physics, 'non perfect' lumber, and my general framing/construction ignorance. :)

The helix will have 4" rail to rail elevation rise per revolution. There is 6' 4.5" head room under the 2x6 support beams across the top of the helix structure.

The 2x4s that are mounted to the vertical columns will support a 3/4" plywood base that will in turn support the helix.  The compound miter saw got a major workout figuring out all the odd cuts required to assemble the structure.

The eight vertical support columns are lag bolted to the slab.

 

The 3/4" plywood helix support base is perfectly level even though the slab is not. This was one of the engineering challenges. I will use a multitude of different height riser blocks to provide the correct slope for the first revolution of the helix. Once the first revolution of the helix is complete with the correct slope I can use constant height riser blocks to build to next 3 1/2 revolutions. The helix will be built with 2 overlapping layers of 15/32" sanded plywood.

The vertical column in front of the helix in this photo will provide support for the upper level return loop and will also provide support for the lower and middle level benchwork. It is lined up with the outside edge of the lower/middle level benchwork and the outside helix vertical support column. The mainline track will come in from the right and curve to the right and enter the right side of the helix. The helix will climb in a counter clockwise direction and exit on the middle level headed back in this direction.

The upper return loop will be 40" radius and it will have 5 staging track loops inside of it.

 

Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

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Posted by BroadwayLion on Sunday, August 23, 2015 5:19 PM

Is it done yet? Is it done yet?

Can I come over and play with your trains?

How about your stuffed leopard?

 

ROAR

The Route of the Broadway Lion The Largest Subway Layout in North Dakota.

Here there be cats.                                LIONS with CAMERAS

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Posted by Onewolf on Sunday, August 23, 2015 5:54 PM

BroadwayLion

Is it done yet? Is it done yet?

Can I come over and play with your trains?

How about your stuffed leopard?

 

ROAR

It will be done tomorrow.  And it's not a leopard, it's a Cheeto. I mean Cheetah.  Chester the Cheetah.

Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

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Posted by davidmurray on Sunday, August 23, 2015 7:44 PM

Onewolf:

If you have not thought of this, it might be a lot easier to add track to each circle of the helix before adding the next.  Four inches isn't much room to get hands into.

Dave

David Murray from Oshawa, Ontario Canada
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Posted by BroadwayLion on Sunday, August 23, 2015 9:09 PM

davidmurray

Onewolf:

If you have not thought of this, it might be a lot easier to add track to each circle of the helix before adding the next.  Four inches isn't much room to get hands into.

Dave

 

Thats how I built mine. Complete with signals in the helix. Gotta let that rail cam look at something., eh.

ROAR

The Route of the Broadway Lion The Largest Subway Layout in North Dakota.

Here there be cats.                                LIONS with CAMERAS

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Posted by rrinker on Sunday, August 23, 2015 10:07 PM

 I guess we could call it "Pulling a Hediger" since as Jim Hediger has related in several places, as one of the first to go double deck, he spent all day getting his helix built just right, and then his friend who was helping said "Sure looks nice, but how are we going to get the track in there?" so they had to tear it apart and put it back together, this time putting the track in as they went.

                 --Randy


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by Onewolf on Monday, August 24, 2015 5:09 AM

I definitely plan to lay and wire the track on the helix as I build the helix. That's how I built the (much smaller) helix on the previous layout.

Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

  • Member since
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  • From: East Central Florida
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Posted by Onewolf on Monday, August 24, 2015 9:25 AM

JEFFREY LESLIE

Incredible.

I have some questions about the carpet squares.

Did they come with any sort of padding backing?

If not, did you put any padding down?

What did you use to attach the squares to the concrete floor?

I'm wondering about moisture and bare concrete floor with carpet directly on it.

Thanks

The carpet tiles have a thin pad sort of backing.  I did not install any padding under the carpet tiles.  I chose to not affix the carpet tiles with glue or double sided tape and so far that has worked out great. I have no problems with the tiles lifting/moving even when I roll around on my rolling chair.

I applied sealer/densifier to the concrete slab but I don't think I will ever have a moisture issue with the slab (barring some sort of plumbing disaster).

Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

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Posted by carl425 on Monday, August 24, 2015 6:11 PM

Onewolf

I definitely plan to lay and wire the track on the helix as I build the helix. That's how I built the (much smaller) helix on the previous layout.

 

I'm curious about this helix.  What was the radius/grade?  What kind of trains did you run up it?  Ever have any stringlining? 

I have the right to remain silent.  By posting here I have given up that right and accept that anything I say can and will be used as evidence to critique me.

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Posted by Onewolf on Tuesday, August 25, 2015 5:24 AM

carl425

 

I'm curious about this helix.  What was the radius/grade?  What kind of trains did you run up it?  Ever have any stringlining? 

 

 
The helix on the previous layout was 24" radius with 4" rail-head to rail-head separation.  The grade was about 2.6%.  I mostly ran 50ft rolling stock, but large articulated steam locos and 85 ft passenger cars could traverse the helix ok (but just barely).  I only ran about 8 ft long trains and stringlining was not a problem. It was built with two overlapping layers of 1/4" luan plywood.

Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

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Posted by tin can on Tuesday, August 25, 2015 9:42 PM

Nice, Onewolf, nice...

Thanks for sharing your progress and your fantastic work....

Remember the tin can; the MKT's central Texas branch...
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Posted by Onewolf on Saturday, August 29, 2015 10:39 AM

I used 3rdPlanit CAD software to try to figure out the optimal plywood cuts for the helix. The helix will be constructed with two overlapping layers of 15/32" sanded plywood and it will be 4.5 revolutions long. The left option would take 36 1/4 arc segments and require eight 4x8 sheets of plywood. The middle option will require 24 1/4 arc segments and 16 1/5 arc segments and it would require six plywood sheets. The far right option (1/3 arcs) will require 27 1/3 arc segments and nine plywood sheets (and waste the most plywood).

Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

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