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"crown" on streets

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  • Member since
    January 2005
  • From: Winnipeg Canada
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"crown" on streets
Posted by Blind Bruce on Friday, June 20, 2014 1:53 PM

I was perusing some earlier posts on model street construction methods. Without exception, there were ways to build a streed or road with a "crown".

As far as I know, the crown in 1-1 scale is only about 3 inches. This is about 1/32nd in HO.

Would this be noticable at all? Seems like a lot of trouble if it won't be noticed.

My rural street(s) would be paved, probably with concrete (1949 era).

73

Bruce in the Peg

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  • From: Fullerton, California
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Posted by hornblower on Friday, June 20, 2014 2:39 PM

I built all of my roads using .040" sheet styrene as a road base with a layer of Creatology Fun Foam sheets glued on top of the styrene.  To model the crown, I simply cut 1/4" strips of .040" styrene and glued them to the layout deck along the roadway centerlines.  I then glued the sheet styrene road base over the styrene strips with the road edges glued directly to the layout deck.  The effect is a noticable crown that simply looks more realistic than a flat road.  

Hornblower

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Posted by tomikawaTT on Friday, June 20, 2014 3:39 PM

The crown (or lack thereof) becomes noticeable when you put model vehicles on the street.  In the real world they appear to be leaning to the curb side.  If they don't do that when modeled they just look wrong.

Chuck (Modeling Central Japan in September, 1964 - with 'two ruts in the mud' roads)

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Posted by maxman on Friday, June 20, 2014 8:12 PM

tomikawaTT
The crown (or lack thereof) becomes noticeable when you put model vehicles on the street. In the real world they appear to be leaning to the curb side. If they don't do that when modeled they just look wrong.

 

Maybe when viewed from the end.  I'm not sure I've ever been conscious of any lean when looking at a prototype vehicle from the side.  But then I'm not sure I've ever been conscious.

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Posted by zstripe on Friday, June 20, 2014 8:28 PM

Bruce,

I use the Walthers Cornerstone Brick Street system, 12ft worth, plus side streets and it is very noticeable, by at least an 1/8 of an inch, with sidewalk curb sewer grates and man-hole covers. Just finished putting the two #4 switches in the street along with track. Been working on that for a full year. A lot of measuring, cutting, filing and testing. But it paid off. Now comes the 1930's RIX overpasses, which I have a 600 scale feet to do. They will be three lane, with center Island using part of the third lane, with street lights on the Island. That's how it was in Chicago, growing up in the 40's.

Take Care!

Frank

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  • From: Potomac Yard
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Posted by NittanyLion on Friday, June 20, 2014 11:02 PM

maxman

 

 
tomikawaTT
The crown (or lack thereof) becomes noticeable when you put model vehicles on the street. In the real world they appear to be leaning to the curb side. If they don't do that when modeled they just look wrong.

 

 

Maybe when viewed from the end.  I'm not sure I've ever been conscious of any lean when looking at a prototype vehicle from the side.  But then I'm not sure I've ever been conscious.

 

I agree.  I've only ever noticed it on very old streets, with cars that are parked right on the curb, where the road has subsided a few inches.  I know I sure don't feel like I'm walking up hill when I cross a street or leaning to the left when I'm driving to compensate for the car leaning enough for me to notice!

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Posted by glutrain on Saturday, June 21, 2014 12:36 AM

Since I desired tealistic looking storm drains, I did feel the necessity of crowning my main streets. Used thin layers of Woodland Scenic's Smooth-It plaster that were then hand sanded into the crown shape, Downtown Deco's sidewalks made a very good gauge for planning the road height at the peak of the crown. Time consuming to do it that way, but results were much better than the worn window screening that acted as a stand-in or place holder for pavement.

Don H.

 

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Posted by zstripe on Saturday, June 21, 2014 4:02 AM

Just to add to my previous post. You must remember...streets of old were more narrow than streets starting in the 60's, some area's the late 50's. It would (crown) be more noticeable on a narrow road. When I started working on the dock for a truckline, Moore freight line to be exact. I was told to load the trailers starting in the nose with the heavy freight on the high side of the trailer, which would be the left side facing the nose, which would be directly over the center crown of the road. Especially would be helpful around curves, I should not need to explain why.

As far as driving a car on a old highway with a crown, you surely would know it. You must remember suspensions of old and beginning 60's were a lot different and today's totally different. If you have a noticeable lean in your vehicle today, there's something wrong with your suspension. Big Smile

Take Care!

Frank

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