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controlling two trains

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controlling two trains
Posted by stuartmit on Friday, January 26, 2024 2:14 PM

I know, in the old days, Lionel proposed ways you could run two trains  ostensibly yourself. You could use isolated blocks of track and 153C devices or relays so that one train could turn off the other to eliminate any collisions. But even using that system, I find it is very difficult to concentrate on both trains voltage requirements in the following situation.  If your layout has grades, and you are running two different locos with quite different motors, like a 2046 and a 2343, the voltage and resulting speed for one going downhill will be very different from the other. The same is true for uphill climbs. The result is that running two trains over the same trackage is very demanding of the operator's attention, even if one train's stopping to allow the other to pass is automatically controlled.  In some blocks in which the different trains may go up or downhill in different directions, the voltage need for one to climb can be ruinous to the other coming down hill on or into a curve.  Is there a solution in a traditionally wired layout?  Otherwise, you are so hard at work with 2 or more transformer throttles that you can not enjoy watching the trains run.

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Posted by pennytrains on Friday, January 26, 2024 8:37 PM

I feel your pain.  All through the Christmas season I was stuck in the corner operating the trains while everyone else got to see them from all angles.

In my case I have 4 power supplies available.  The primaries are the KW for the O gauge and a Type K with a 95 rheostat for the Standard gauge oval.  I can generally count on the O gauge train to behave itself whether it's AC powered running on the KW or DC powered operating from the Aristo-Craft Train Pack 7000.  (A knife switch lets me change from one power source to the other.)

The Standard gauge is the problem.  My little No. 8 will only operate reliably on 24 volts.  The Type K is the only one I've seen that can make my rickety wreck get up and go. That means constant adjustments of both the 95 rheostat and the throttle lever on the K.

My layout is not big enough for two train operation on one track but I know how it is to sit in one place and not truly be able to enjoy your handiwork.  Wink

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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Posted by pennytrains on Friday, January 26, 2024 8:40 PM

PS the 4th power supply is a Type R that handles half of the lighting and accessory load.

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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Posted by smokey1 on Friday, January 26, 2024 11:32 PM

pennytrains

 

The Standard gauge is the problem.  My little No. 8 will only operate reliably on 24 volts.  

Someting must be wrong with your #8 if it takes 24V, or do you mean 24V to the 95 rheostat. I run my 402 and 408 which are dual motors probably around 10 - 14 volts. I sold my #8's I had as I found as a whole they couldn't pull more than a couple of cars. 

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Posted by ADCX Rob on Saturday, January 27, 2024 9:50 AM

stuartmit
controlling two trains... I know, in the old days, Lionel proposed ways you could run two trains ostensibly yourself. You could use isolated blocks of track and 153C devices or relays



The proper way of setting up blocks the old fashioned way is to not let one train proceed until the first one clears the next block.

When you introduce grades and trains with somewhat different operating characteristics, it complicates the design. Flat operations are easy, though.

Rob

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Posted by trainlivebob on Saturday, January 27, 2024 1:18 PM

ADCX Rob

 Ive done this on my outside oval and it works if the trains are similar in speed.  if they are very differenct the speedy one may catch up.

I trying now to do this with 45 degree crossings in the loop and this seems harder since the crossing has connections across loops.

 
stuartmit
controlling two trains... I know, in the old days, Lionel proposed ways you could run two trains ostensibly yourself. You could use isolated blocks of track and 153C devices or relays

 



The proper way of setting up blocks the old fashioned way is to not let one train proceed until the first one clears the next block.

 

When you introduce grades and trains with somewhat different operating characteristics, it complicates the design. Flat operations are easy, though.

 

  • Member since
    December 2005
  • From: Hopewell, NY
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Posted by ADCX Rob on Saturday, January 27, 2024 5:40 PM

trainlivebob
Ive done this on my outside oval and it works if the trains are similar in speed. if they are very differenct the speedy one may catch up.

The loops are too small and/or the trains are too long and too unbalanced speed-wise.

Rob

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Posted by pennytrains on Saturday, January 27, 2024 5:49 PM

smokey1

 

 
pennytrains

 

The Standard gauge is the problem.  My little No. 8 will only operate reliably on 24 volts.  

 

 

Someting must be wrong with your #8 if it takes 24V, or do you mean 24V to the 95 rheostat. I run my 402 and 408 which are dual motors probably around 10 - 14 volts. I sold my #8's I had as I found as a whole they couldn't pull more than a couple of cars. 

 

 

It had a rough life.  Somebody restored it then let acid leak all over it.  I did everything I could and I'm just lucky it runs at all.  It's also the only loco I own.

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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Posted by smokey1 on Sunday, January 28, 2024 10:58 AM

I just checked the spare motor I have will not work, I have a bilt a loco motor. I was going to give it to you, you as I see it are one of the rocks for this forum. 

 

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