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Steam in Boston (Two photos)

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Steam in Boston (Two photos)
Posted by 03 1008 on Tuesday, September 21, 2021 12:45 AM

The other day two photos from the Boston area were posted on a German website:

 

https://eisenbahnstiftung.de/images/bildergalerie/80115.jpg

 

 

Text: Lok No. 308 der Boston & Albany Railroad (einer Tochtergesellschaft der New York Central) fährt in die Station Newton Centre ein. Newton Centre liegt an der Strecke Richtung Albany, NY. Die Lok war eine der in den USA relativ seltenen Tenderloks mit der Achsfolge 1'C3'-h2t. (22.02.1947) Foto: Robert A. LaMay

 

https://eisenbahnstiftung.de/images/bildergalerie/80116.jpg

 

Text: Die neue Hudson-Stromlinienlok I-5 class No. 1409 startet in Boston/Massachusetts mit einem Personenzug über Providence nach New Haven/Connecticut. Die New Haven "Hudsons" wurden 1937 von Baldwin in nur 10 Exemplaren für die New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad (NYNH&H) gebaut. Der Name "Hudson" stammte von der New York Central, weil die 2'C2' (amerik. 4-6-4) Loks dort nördlich von Harmon am Hudson River entlangfuhren. Bei der NYNH&H nannte man die Loks "Shore Line type", da sie nur auf den 140 Meilen zwischen Boston und New Haven verkehrten (weiter nach New York ging es elektrisch). Die Maschinen sollen in der Lage gewesen sein, einen 12-Wagenzug mit 830 t über die Sharon Heights mit knapp 100 km/h (60 mph) zu befördern. (12.10.1937) Foto: Robert A. LaMay

 

Further details would be welcome.

 

Best wishes from Germany, Helmut

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Posted by rcdrye on Tuesday, September 21, 2021 6:31 AM

03 1008
Text: Lok No. 308 der Boston & Albany Railroad (einer Tochtergesellschaft der New York Central) fährt in die Station Newton Centre ein. Newton Centre liegt an der Strecke Richtung Albany, NY. Die Lok war eine der in den USA relativ seltenen Tenderloks mit der Achsfolge 1'C3'-h2t. (22.02.1947) Foto: Robert A. LaMay

Loco number 308 of the Boston & Albany (a subsidieary of New York Central) arrives in Newton Centre Station. Newton Centre is in the direction of Albany NY.  The engine is a  relatively rare tank locomotive with a wheel arrangement of 2-6-6T. 

03 1008
Text: Die neue Hudson-Stromlinienlok I-5 class No. 1409 startet in Boston/Massachusetts mit einem Personenzug über Providence nach New Haven/Connecticut. Die New Haven "Hudsons" wurden 1937 von Baldwin in nur 10 Exemplaren für die New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad (NYNH&H) gebaut. Der Name "Hudson" stammte von der New York Central, weil die 2'C2' (amerik. 4-6-4) Loks dort nördlich von Harmon am Hudson River entlangfuhren. Bei der NYNH&H nannte man die Loks "Shore Line type", da sie nur auf den 140 Meilen zwischen Boston und New Haven verkehrten (weiter nach New York ging es elektrisch). Die Maschinen sollen in der Lage gewesen sein, einen 12-Wagenzug mit 830 t über die Sharon Heights mit knapp 100 km/h (60 mph) zu befördern. (12.10.1937) Foto: Robert A. LaMay

The new streamlined Hudson class I-5 no. 1409 leaves Boston with a passenger train via Providence to Connecticut.  The New Haven "Hudsons" were built by Baldwin in 1937 with only 10 examples.  The name "Hudson" comes from the New York Central, because the 4-6-4 (NYC's) locomotives travel the length of the Hudson north of Harmon.  On the New Haven the engines are the "Shore Line type" as they cover only the 140 miles between Boston and New Haven (the rest to New York is electric).  The engines were cabable of pulling a 12 car train of 830 tons over Sharon Heights at 60 mph.

Boston and Albany had a suburban loop west of Boston.  The main line (today's MBTA Worcester line) and the Highland branch via Newton Centre (Today's MBTA "D" Green line light rail) got frequent service.  The B&A had several classes of tank locomotives of which the D-2a 2-6-4Ts were the most common. The D-1A 4-6-6Ts were probably the heaviest tank engines used in North America outside of some logging mallets.  While there were many pre-1900 suburban tank engine operations, and a few that lasted into the 1920s, the B&A's was the last one.

New Haven's Shore Line (since electrified, now part of Amtrak's Northeast Corridor) hosted and still hosts many passenger trains.  The I-5s had a relatively short life, as New HAven began replacing steam a couple of years after they arrived, first with 60 dual-service DL109s and later with postwar Alco and FM power.  The last I-5 was retired in 1951.

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Posted by pennytrains on Tuesday, September 21, 2021 6:02 PM

Beautiful photos!  I really like the first one with the snow!

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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Posted by MidlandMike on Tuesday, September 21, 2021 9:21 PM

Adjacent to the B&A Tank engine suburban line was a B&A electric stub line (1.2 mile) using 550 volt trolley wire and a single motor car.  It ran 1900-1930, between Newton Lower Falls and Riverside.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Tuesday, September 21, 2021 9:38 PM

Thanks Helmut, those are beautiful photographs!

And that first one, there's something special about steam in the snow, isn't there?

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Posted by pennytrains on Wednesday, September 22, 2021 6:16 PM

Flintlock76
there's something special about steam in the snow, isn't there?

Yeah!  Makes you think of home, holidays and loved ones doesn't it!  Wink

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Wednesday, September 22, 2021 6:44 PM

pennytrains

 

 
Flintlock76
there's something special about steam in the snow, isn't there?

 

Yeah!  Makes you think of home, holidays and loved ones doesn't it!  Wink

 

That it does, and especially Christmas, which a wiser man than me once called "The axle upon which the whole year turns."

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