Trains.com

Budd RDC cars (and its echo, the SPV?)

2692 views
7 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    June 2002
  • 19,937 posts
Budd RDC cars (and its echo, the SPV?)
Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, October 25, 2017 5:22 AM

Some photos of the original applicaton, from Nov. 1949, on the Boston and Albany:

 

  • Member since
    September 2011
  • 6,368 posts
Posted by MidlandMike on Wednesday, October 25, 2017 7:48 PM

I like the picture of the RDC under the water spout.

  • Member since
    June 2002
  • 19,937 posts
Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, October 26, 2017 2:55 AM

Note what the building to the right of Worcester Union Station is

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 21,118 posts
Posted by Overmod on Thursday, October 26, 2017 12:59 PM

daveklepper
Note what the building to the right of Worcester Union Station is

Hard to read, but I expect fine railcars were made there!  I like the 'city pride' signage.

  • Member since
    June 2002
  • 19,937 posts
Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, January 17, 2024 5:17 AM

For somecreason, my reading the Budd RDC article in the Summer (correction, Winter, page 53)  2022  issue got delayed untilo yesterday evening.

 

It states thast the two GM diesel engibnes are roof-mounted.  Sure, the exhaust comes from the  roof blister, but that blister's function is primarily cooling.  The engines are underfloor-mounted, and one is bring inspected in my photograph above, taken very soon afterthe first revenue operation of Budd RDC, Autumn 1949, Boston-Worcester-Springfield, above at Worcester.  If I recall correctly, each pancake sideways diesel is just toward the car's center from each truck (bogie), with a longitudinal camshaft, power-transfer shaft, and Spicer gearing to the neaerest axle.

Possibly a very compact hydraulic transmission interruping the  drive-shaft.

 

  • Member since
    May 2012
  • 4,942 posts
Posted by rcdrye on Wednesday, January 17, 2024 7:32 AM

RDCs were originally set up with two Detroit Diesel 6-110 engines.  The engines were mounted on slide racks, so they could be easily changed out with just a forklift.  The Allison (also GM) transmission was adapted from one developed for the US Army. A standard "cardan shaft" driveshaft went between the transmission and the Spicer unit. The Spicer units bolted on to the inside axle (RDCs are 1a-a1 in wheel arrangement).  All of the stuff in the hump is for A/C and engine cooling, with car heat generated from the engines, like an automobile.  RDC-9s (B&M, later CN) had only a single engine and no controls, and a reputation for being cold.

RDC's had a five-notch throttle.  The B&M's mechanical department figured out how to build an MU jumper so that RDCs could be controlled from GP7s, and vice-versa, allowing for push-pull MU operation.

  • Member since
    September 2011
  • 6,368 posts
Posted by MidlandMike on Wednesday, January 17, 2024 9:29 PM

My recollection is that the exhaust stack also went thru the roof blister.

  • Member since
    June 2002
  • 19,937 posts
Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, January 18, 2024 1:22 AM

1.  Yes, Mike, and thecexhaust misled the artivcle's uthor as to the location of the diesels.

2.  Winter 2022 issue, not Summer.  Winter, page 53 for the error.  Nothing like the fog in the memory of someone to be 92 by the secular calendar a week from today, to turn Winter into  Summer.

SUBSCRIBER & MEMBER LOGIN

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

FREE NEWSLETTER SIGNUP

Get the Classic Trains twice-monthly newsletter