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Steam engine roundhouse in New York City

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, February 2, 2010 4:52 AM

 Pretty sure the electrification at one time went down as far as 60th Street.

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Posted by timz on Tuesday, February 2, 2010 8:36 PM

That Shaughnessy pic (says 1957) shows third rail on that elevated loop around 30th St Yard-- presumably it went down to St Johns Park, but don't offhand recall a pic that proves that. (Lots of pics show the elevated line south of 30th St when it opened in 1934, when it didn't yet have third rail.)

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Posted by wanswheel on Tuesday, February 2, 2010 10:01 PM

I sure don't know beans, but at present I think that virtually the entire West Side Line was electrified, including the cut from 60th St. to 35th St., and that until the late 1950s, a freight train could be pulled by an electric locomotive all the way from Harmon to St. Johns Park. In pictures of the cut when it was new in 1937, it was pointed out, some ties are wide, as if for future installation of third rail.

In the lower right corner of this picture is the beginning of what I call "third and fourth rail" in the middle of the track, which seems to be the electric power source on the High Line.

10th Ave. & 30th St. spur into the Morgan Parcel Post building built on the site of the old Hudson River Railroad passenger station. This was the last stretch of track to be de-electrified around 1961.

Interesting pictures at The High Line website...

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3025/3251565978_7426954105_b.jpg?rand=164362880 Tri

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3029/3251447516_60a77120cc_b.jpg?rand=864409136  Tri

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3030/3251565572_663d9a6c0a_b.jpg?rand=676422797 Track

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3132/3251566214_d764d617b5_b.jpg?rand=113730372 Track

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3457/3250740015_844a977c76_b.jpg?rand=704256093  SJP

http://railyardsblog.files.wordpress.com/2007/12/historic-image-large.jpg   30th St. Loop

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3414/3250575471_3cfd1b0f9c_b.jpg?rand=169772561 Loop

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3472/3251278566_d746808d7a_b.jpg?rand=605779465 RS-3 

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3323/3250737625_6c27d4032f_b.jpg?rand=714535022 RS-3

thehighline.org

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, February 5, 2010 3:53 AM

The Central NEVER used between the rails electric power rails.   Any rails between the running rails were only guard rails.   The central only used underruning outside third rail and overhead rails reached by small pantographs to avoid long gaps in the throat of GCT.

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Posted by wanswheel on Sunday, February 21, 2010 1:20 PM
Guard rail to prevent a derailed train from toppling.  Of course.  Instead I somehow thought a Tri-power locomotive had a contact shoe on the inside.  Dumb.  It was a versatile engine, though.   According to The American Diesel Locomotive by Brian Solomon, "It could operate as a straight third-rail electric, as a battery-electric from onboard storage batteries, or as a battery-electric/diesel-electric, drawing power from both batteries and the onboard diesel engine.  The diesel engine would charge the batteries, but the third rail connection could not."

On a personal note, I need to express gratitude to Henry and regret that this thread veered way off topic at his expense. I should've installed guard rail.

Mike

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Posted by henry6 on Sunday, February 21, 2010 1:48 PM

Come on Mike...fun, interesting, and great discussions never stay on topic but wander in and out of the topic in a most entertaining and informative way.  Then add your pictures and it's sheer pleasure!

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Posted by Great Western on Monday, February 22, 2010 8:27 AM

 As an addition to my post, today, in the Hudson River topic I would like to mention that this particular  thread is the one which sparked my interest, particularly the freight operations, of the old NYC in Manhattan. 

One thing I loved to see in the 'photos were the horses.  I always have a great feeling seeing 'photos of horses dutifully awaiting their work which usually meant  pulling various type of carts with loads and also boats, as they did in yesteryear on UK canals.  I guess it is the same feeling that we all have when we compare steam locos with diesels.

Thanks to Google maps I have been able to plot the Hi Line route, including a guess at the lost parts and yards, also to see what was 'the new cutting route' from 35th. to 60th. streets.  I have noticed that N-S roads are avenues and E-W are streets. Laugh


Alan, Oliver & North Fork Railroad

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If you don't know where you are going, any road will take you there. Lewis Carroll English author & recreational mathematician (1832 - 1898)

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Posted by timz on Monday, February 22, 2010 12:18 PM

Great Western
also to see what was 'the new cutting route' from 35th. to 60th. streets. 

Is, not was. Passenger trains still use that.

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Posted by Great Western on Monday, February 22, 2010 12:50 PM

 Thanks for your comment, I know it is still used today but I did say "what was the new cutting route".  It was new then.Smile

Alan, Oliver & North Fork Railroad

https://www.buckfast.org.uk/

If you don't know where you are going, any road will take you there. Lewis Carroll English author & recreational mathematician (1832 - 1898)

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