Trains.com

Truck removal on former VIA Rail Sleeping Car

717 views
10 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    June 2009
  • From: Dallas, TX
  • 5,015 posts
Truck removal on former VIA Rail Sleeping Car
Posted by CMStPnP on Sunday, April 4, 2021 6:16 PM

Check it out.   Hard for me to believe the only thing fixing this truck to a passenger car is 1 cotter pin and the center pin assembly.    I guess that is modern engineering for you..........

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fPjFEGHnSM0

 

 Background:   This sleeping car was purchased by RAPIDO trains for preservation.  So far they have spent close to $200,000 on it, so far.    Window replacement, repainting, some interior repair and I believe they had to replace 1 pair of wheels and axles in order to move it from Georgia to Ontario, Canada.   I believe it is shown here at the Toronto Maintence Facility of VIA Rail.    Sad part of the move from Georgia to Canada.   One overnight in CP's Toronto yards and some idiots put graffitti on the car sides.    All it took was a few hours in one yard.    You can see from the video the graffitti was since removed.

Structural and floor inspection video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=70UHZ3QqgDs

 

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 15,997 posts
Posted by Overmod on Sunday, April 4, 2021 11:19 PM

Note that the weight of the car does most of the work "securing" the truck; all the locking centerpin does is keep the truck attached in 'tension', and if you think about the structure described it does that compellingly well.  Note that the 'flange' is what does the securement, and is essentially a stout steel collar retaining the truck; the wedge goes in FROM ABOVE, is hammered to positive engagement, and then is pinned wedged in (and the cotter holds that transverse locking pin from coming out).  Even if it were just a cotter holding the wedge... that's a big honkin' cotter!

If you can figure out a load that could shear that cotter, let the pin come out laterally, and then get the wedge to come up enough to let both half-pins come up... well, that's an awful lot of simultaneous coincidence.

  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: US
  • 20,389 posts
Posted by BaltACD on Monday, April 5, 2021 1:55 PM

Overmod
Note that the weight of the car does most of the work "securing" the truck; all the locking centerpin does is keep the truck attached in 'tension', and if you think about the structure described it does that compellingly well.  Note that the 'flange' is what does the securement, and is essentially a stout steel collar retaining the truck; the wedge goes in FROM ABOVE, is hammered to positive engagement, and then is pinned wedged in (and the cotter holds that transverse locking pin from coming out).  Even if it were just a cotter holding the wedge... that's a big honkin' cotter!

If you can figure out a load that could shear that cotter, let the pin come out laterally, and then get the wedge to come up enough to let both half-pins come up... well, that's an awful lot of simultaneous coincidence.

So there is a designated access through the floor to permit securing the center pin from above?

  • Member since
    December 2017
  • From: I've been everywhere, man
  • 3,323 posts
Posted by SD70Dude on Monday, April 5, 2021 2:47 PM

BaltACD
Overmod
Note that the weight of the car does most of the work "securing" the truck; all the locking centerpin does is keep the truck attached in 'tension', and if you think about the structure described it does that compellingly well.  Note that the 'flange' is what does the securement, and is essentially a stout steel collar retaining the truck; the wedge goes in FROM ABOVE, is hammered to positive engagement, and then is pinned wedged in (and the cotter holds that transverse locking pin from coming out).  Even if it were just a cotter holding the wedge... that's a big honkin' cotter!

If you can figure out a load that could shear that cotter, let the pin come out laterally, and then get the wedge to come up enough to let both half-pins come up... well, that's an awful lot of simultaneous coincidence.

So there is a designated access through the floor to permit securing the center pin from above?

Yes.  There should be a small hatch in the floor above the pin.  

Some cars that were modified later in life by non-railroaders have had other stuff built above the hatch.  I once had to help remove part of a kitchen cabinet in order to get at the hatch.

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

  • Member since
    July 2016
  • 1,179 posts
Posted by Backshop on Monday, April 5, 2021 5:40 PM

I believe battleship turrets, which weigh hundreds of tons, are just held in place by gravity.

  • Member since
    April 2015
  • 367 posts
Posted by Enzoamps on Monday, April 5, 2021 6:24 PM

SO when Godzilla picks up the train cars, the wheels will FALL RIGHT OFF...Oh no.

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 15,997 posts
Posted by Overmod on Monday, April 5, 2021 7:22 PM

Enzoamps
SO when Godzilla picks up the train cars, the wheels will FALL RIGHT OFF...Oh no.

The point of the fancy pin construction is precisely so the trucks WOULDN'T fall off.  The journal boxes are held to the truck frame either by pedestals or arms and struts; it will usually take work to dislodge them.

Note that freight trucks are different, because three-piece structure is different.  There have been attempts over the years to arrange some kind of locking center pin arrangement, but most three-piece designs already rely primarily or absolutely on gravity to hold the sideframe ends on the bearing carriers -- just jacking up the sideframes lets the wheelset with its package bearings roll right out, there almost always being no clasp brake foundation out past the ends.  And if the wheelsets part company it would not be long before the sideframes departed the locked-in bolster.  A 'safe' locking pin would have to drop in from the top, as in the passenger application, with the bowl arrangement modified for the multiple pieces rather than just having a strong fixed pin; it might take all sorts of work to unload a car with a bad truck to reach the pin, then reload it when done.

One of the quiet things that made 'security' pinning less critical was the introduction of controlled constant-contact side bearings, which better keep the body from rocking to destabilize the car, or arrest some of the tendency for trucks to hunt at speed.

So Godzilla picks up freight cars and the wheels fall off.  They'll go back on almost as easily once the big guy leaves for Tokyo.

  • Member since
    September 2010
  • From: East Coast
  • 986 posts
Posted by D.Carleton on Monday, April 5, 2021 9:01 PM

BaltACD

So there is a designated access through the floor to permit securing the center pin from above?

Not necessarily and not in the case of this car. In the heavyweight era the pins were accessed from the inside, a good thing with six-wheel trucks and the center axle getting in the way of dropping the pin. In the streamlined era the pin, such as the one in the video, was inserted/removed from underneath the car. For operation in the US it has to be there: 49CFR238.307(c)(8) All trucks are equipped with a device or securing arrangement to prevent the truck and car body from separating in case of derailment.

Editor Emeritus, This Week at Amtrak

  • Member since
    December 2008
  • From: Toronto, Canada
  • 2,134 posts
Posted by 54light15 on Monday, April 5, 2021 9:12 PM

I've restored automobiles before and I see the similarities in the process. Two big differences are, the tools are larger and you'd better wear steel-toe shoes. 

A question: what's with the Budd cars? I think I've seen them at the Mimico yard but why are they used in this way? 

  • Member since
    December 2007
  • From: Georgia USA SW of Atlanta
  • 10,201 posts
Posted by blue streak 1 on Tuesday, April 6, 2021 11:18 PM

Backshop

I believe battleship turrets, which weigh hundreds of tons, are just held in place by gravity.

 
Correct:  Also applied to smaller gun turrents as well.  I believe that this design allowed for a ship to go to port and actually have a damaged out of service turrent replaced by overhead crane.
  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: US
  • 20,389 posts
Posted by BaltACD on Wednesday, April 7, 2021 3:31 PM

People would be amazed at how engineers use gravity to their advantage.

Join our Community!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

Search the Community

Newsletter Sign-Up

By signing up you may also receive occasional reader surveys and special offers from Trains magazine.Please view our privacy policy