Acela-2 number 2 train set testing

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Acela-2 number 2 train set testing
Posted by blue streak 1 on Friday, May 29, 2020 1:25 PM

Amtrak ran the numer 2 train set from PHL out the Keystone route.  Now do not get the idea that means Acela service to Harrisburg in the future.   Suspect several reasons for that testing.

1.  very slow speed first test appeared to be just about 25 MPH.  Probably will run the train set over the route in slow increments faster any where from 10 to 25 MPH ?

2.  No other traffic so train could pause if necessary for any reason.

3.  Amtrak has a request for funds to up grade the CAT on this line due to it having the lowest grades for being in a state of good repair.  ( SOGR ) .  If the AX-2s can run on the Harrisburg CAT it should be able to run any where on the NEC.

4.  At least the unit 2 runs with pan up at rear both ways so if CAT snagged then unit can proceed with front pan up.

Wonder if Amtrak will test it all the way to Harrisburgh ?  About that european horn.  Maybe all units should have that horn so persons near will know a very high speed train approching ?  Do you think maybe Schummer would agree ?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUVKtaH09z8&feature=youtu.be 

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Posted by blue streak 1 on Monday, July 13, 2020 5:02 PM

Update on Acela testing and passenger car per NGEC acquisition committee.

Amtrak Equipment Procurement Update – as of 6-16-20:

On the Acela: The first Trainset is at Pueblo at TTCI for testing. It has reached speeds up to 165 mph on the test track. The second Trainset has done a few early runs out of Philly a couple of times and has reached 125 mph. There are still a few PTC issues that are being worked on.

On the Charger Locomotives: The locomotive continues to be under construction with little impact from the COVID 19 pandemic. It remains on schedule for February-March (2021) delivery of the first test locomotive on the NEC. On the Intercity Trainset Procurement: This procurement is proceeding, but it is at a stage where it remains in the “cone of silence”. 

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Posted by charlie hebdo on Monday, July 13, 2020 9:21 PM

I personally think that European horn is more effective at getting attention. 

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, July 13, 2020 10:42 PM

blue streak 1
Do you think maybe Schumer would agree ?

I think you're talking about the other one, "Near Miss Dick" Blumenthal.

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Posted by blue streak 1 on Wednesday, July 15, 2020 10:35 AM

From the NGEC report of June.

Amtrak Equipment Procurement Update – as of 6-16-20:
On the Acela: The first Trainset is at Pueblo at TTCI for testing. It has reached speeds up to 165 mph on the test track. The second Trainset has done a few early runs out of Philly a couple of times and has reached 125 mph. There are still a few PTC issues that are being worked on.
On the Charger Locomotives: The locomotive continues to be under construction with little impact from the COVID 19 pandemic. It remains on schedule for February-March (2021) delivery of the first test locomotive on the NEC.
On the Intercity Trainset Procurement: This procurement is proceeding, but it is at a stage where it remains in the “cone of silence”.

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Posted by Paul Milenkovic on Wednesday, July 15, 2020 10:55 PM

This train is "articulated" (neighboring train cars sharing what is called a Jacobs bogie).  Does this save weight or offer any other advantage for this train under US conditions?

The coaches appear to narrow towards the roof line.  Does this train tilt?  Does the new shape means the trains can tilt without side swiping, say under worst-case conditions where the tilt on one or both passing trains jams?  Or will there still be restrictions on Metro North?

If GM "killed the electric car", what am I doing standing next to an EV-1, a half a block from the WSOR tracks?
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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, July 15, 2020 11:50 PM

Paul Milenkovic
This train is "articulated" (neighboring train cars sharing what is called a Jacobs bogie).  Does this save weight or offer any other advantage for this train under US conditions?

The usual primary advantage for this arrangement: steering stability.  Presumably care has been taken to allow rapid truck or carbody change should predictive PM (or accidental failure!) require that.

Does this train tilt?  Does the new shape means the trains can tilt without sideswiping, say under worst-case conditions where the tilt on one or both passing trains jams?

Yes.  Tilt is up to nominal 6.3 degrees, and it is more complex than 'pendulum' tilt.  I suspect however there will be comparatively little use of the tilt south/west of New Haven -- I would like to be wrong.  
... will there still be restrictions on MetroNorth?
Everything I have read says that speed on the part owned by MetroNorth will continue to be slow, slow enough that any advantages of power negative cant deficiency would be essentially unnoticeable as time improvement.

 

[/quote]

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Posted by blue streak 1 on Thursday, July 16, 2020 1:42 AM

MNRR will be slow for a long time future.  Why ?  All the bridges that need replacement will cause many choke points.  Already the Walk bridge replacement has narrowed the tracks there to 3 over the present bridge.  Why?  The proposed 2 lift bridges require tracks 1 and 2 (inside tracks ) to be separated about 16 feet to accomodate the lift bridge piers.  So the relocation of the outside north track will not traverse the present bridge.  The north inside track is being rerouted over the outside track of the present bridge to accomodate this change.

So the north outside track is out of service until the new north lift bridge is in service.  There will of course be some closure of the north inside track until all this rerouting work is complete.  That is to allow those two track to be raised somewhat in elevation.  To make matters somewhat worse there has been a CP about 10 miles (?) east of WALK.  A new CP is being built east as close to the bridge as possible. There is a CP just west of WALK that serves the Danbury branch as well as all 4 main tracks. When complete MNRR will have less 2 or 3 tracks over the present WALK bridge That work will of course close off both north tracks for track work and CAT relocations.  So essentially you have just 2 tracks available for ~ 2 - 3 months.

One small benefit is the Danbury branch comes off the north track just west of Walk.  BTW the Danbury branch and storage yard CAT work is complete and train service has restarted as of July 7 (?) to Danbury. 

How does all this affect Amtrak?  It probably will be 2050 before all the worn out bridges are replaced.  So do not expect the schedule reduced New Haven<> Shell to provide for make up time between those 2 points.  Just have any train off schedule to have cascading delays.

When the north lift bridge is complete in service the work for the south lift bridge will nl close the 2 south track for a very short time.  Also note some work on the south lift bridge can start before the north bridge is complete .  I suspect that another bridge work can start once the north Walk bridge is complete if fnding can be found.

 

 

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