News Wire: Truck driver killed, Amtrak 'Illini' derailed in grade-crossing collision

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Posted by Brian Schmidt on Monday, July 29, 2019 11:08 AM

UNIVERSITY PARK, Ill. — Amtrak’s southbound Illini derailed Sunday evening after hitting a truck at a grade crossing near the University Park Metra station, about 30 miles south of Chicago. The driver of the truck was killed, according to...

http://trn.trains.com/news/news-wire/2019/07/29-truck-driver-killed-amtrak-illini-derailed-in-grade-crossing-collision

Brian Schmidt, Associate Editor Trains Magazine

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Posted by charlie hebdo on Monday, July 29, 2019 1:58 PM

Part of having a modern infrastructure is having roads and major rails, especially passenger,  totally separated. 

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Posted by Gramp on Monday, July 29, 2019 3:05 PM

Isn’t something that other passenger trains don’t take an alternate route around the accident?  You sure roll the dice these days when you go by train. 

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Posted by Deggesty on Monday, July 29, 2019 4:13 PM

Gramp

Isn’t something that other passenger trains don’t take an alternate route around the accident?  You sure roll the dice these days when you go by train. 

 

It can be difficult to arrange detours on short notice. Looking at the map, the only beginning to be praticable detour that I see for these trains is making use of the former C&EI  (UP now) down to Tuscola. Remember, you need pilot crews over a foreign road, and the host road may not have any available.

The last detour that affected my travel came last fall when a forest fire in Utah made it necessary for the westbound California Zephyr to "go around the Rockies and not through them"--and we left Denver  late in the afternoon insead of in the morning for several reasons, one being that it was afternoon before the decision was made to go across Wyoming instead of through the Moffat Tunnel.

I pity the people who were waked at Carbondale, and then had a 300 mile ride by bus to Chicago.

Johnny

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, July 29, 2019 4:40 PM

We left the Big Boy exhibition at about 3:45 and had a choice of following 55 with Springfield traffic, or 57 with Illinis and perhaps a City of New Orleans.  We went on 55, despite the GPS repeatedly trying to reroute us to the shorter route.  It's possible we'd have been uncomfortably close to observing this firsthand; as it was, my son was following the Amtrak tracking system for the IC line at the moment it stopped updating.

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Posted by BaltACD on Monday, July 29, 2019 7:39 PM

charlie hebdo
Part of having a modern infrastructure is having roads and major rails, especially passenger,  totally separated. 

Railroading has made is modern route infrastructure from the process of 'plant rationalization over the past half century.

Where, at one time you had five competing routes between the East Coast (NY & Boston) to Chicago - today you are down to two.  Between other major O-D pairs you are for the most part down to one.  Wall Street speaks.

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Posted by charlie hebdo on Monday, July 29, 2019 7:43 PM

Progress,  ain't it great!! 

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, July 29, 2019 8:08 PM

charlie hebdo
Part of having a modern infrastructure is having roads and major rails, especially passenger, totally separated.

That is a major -- and probably economically insoluble -- issue on the rebuilt Chicago-to-Springfield corridor as visible from I-55.  This is all relatively flat land, with roads frequently parallel to the track, and a great many four-gate crossings on two-lane roads that couldn't possibly merit the investment in a full grade-separated overpass arrangement.  Not one had 'bollards' up the center median, either, which may well be an operational concern with the probable extreme activation length (for 110mph) combined with the need to close the 'exit' gates later than the 'entrance' ones to prevent perception of trapping (as I think was a factor at Valhalla)

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Posted by charlie hebdo on Monday, July 29, 2019 8:46 PM

Gee, as a young guy I believed the US was the greatest nation in the world and there was nothing the "Greatest Generation" and later ones couldn't  do.  50 years ago we got to the moon first in a seven year race.  Now?  We can't even have railroad right of ways  safely separated from vehicles and disaster. 

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Tuesday, July 30, 2019 6:45 AM

charlie hebdo

Gee, as a young guy I believed the US was the greatest nation in the world and there was nothing the "Greatest Generation" and later ones couldn't  do.  50 years ago we got to the moon first in a seven year race.  Now?  We can't even have railroad right of ways  safely separated from vehicles and disaster. 

 
And now that the Cold War is over, we haven't been back to the moon for almost fifty years.  Grade separation may not be advanced engineering but it can get expensive quite quickly.  As pointed out earlier, simply closing many of these grade crossings may be unrealistic when the next crossing may be at least one mile away.
The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by charlie hebdo on Tuesday, July 30, 2019 12:04 PM

CSSHEGEWISCH

 

 
charlie hebdo

Gee, as a young guy I believed the US was the greatest nation in the world and there was nothing the "Greatest Generation" and later ones couldn't  do.  50 years ago we got to the moon first in a seven year race.  Now?  We can't even have railroad right of ways  safely separated from vehicles and disaster. 

 

 

 
And now that the Cold War is over, we haven't been back to the moon for almost fifty years.  Grade separation may not be advanced engineering but it can get expensive quite quickly.  As pointed out earlier, simply closing many of these grade crossings may be unrealistic when the next crossing may be at least one mile away.
 

In the midwest, at least, the one-mile-apart road grid is a legacyog the 18th century Northwest Ordinance.  In horse-drawn days, and snall family farms and villages, one mile was far. Now?  Most of those small road grade crossingss should be closed.  On the sorta-HSR route CHI-StL, many of those were closed and others have new, pretty formidable safety crossings.

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Posted by zardoz on Wednesday, July 31, 2019 6:53 PM

charlie hebdo

Gee, as a young guy I believed the US was the greatest nation in the world and there was nothing the "Greatest Generation" and later ones couldn't  do.  50 years ago we got to the moon first in a seven year race.  Now?  We can't even have railroad right of ways  safely separated from vehicles and disaster. 

 

We can't even fix the %$@*& potholes, much less do anything grand.

   23 17 46 11

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Posted by zardoz on Wednesday, July 31, 2019 6:55 PM

charlie hebdo

Progress,  ain't it great!! 

 

Progress is always change, but change is not always progress.

   23 17 46 11

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