New Sydney Metro

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New Sydney Metro
Posted by daveklepper on Monday, August 5, 2019 8:54 AM

Will be posting photos by Evelynn Cherney, member of our Jeerusalem railfans club:

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, August 6, 2019 5:52 AM

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, August 6, 2019 8:43 AM

The metro only stops at stations. You could hop off at any station towards the end of the route where it is above ground, take photos and then hop on the next metro which comes approx every 10 minutes.  There are only 3 or 4 stations which are above ground.
At Chatswood you can see a little of the metro from the street whilst it is in the station as the wall of the building is not full height.
The last few stations going north on the metro are classified as metropolitan but there are not masses of buildings wall to wall. There are big housing estates and several large shopping centres along the route.
Hope that helps,
Regards
Evelynne

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, August 6, 2019 8:55 AM

Apparently, the Moderator delected Ev's two interior shots, possibly becausse of a policy that pictures of identnifyable people still alive are permitted only if permission from the people is obtained.  Also one station picture seems deleted, possibly because the Moderator thought it suplicated another picture, which it did not; there are small dfferences between the two stations.

Be glad to forward the missing photograqphs and take all legal responsibilities for destirbuting them.  Thanks.    daveklepper@yahoo.com

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Posted by M636C on Tuesday, August 6, 2019 9:36 AM

The 35.2 kilometres Chatswood to Tallawong electrified railway opened on Sunday 26 May 2019. The track is standard gauge with the sleepers spaced at around 1500/kilometre the same as has been in general use in Australia for a century or so. The overhead voltage is 1500 volts DC . All stations have glazed platform screen walls with sliding doors that match the doors in the cars. The trains are remotely controlled with no driver. This allows the photographs seen in the above posts.

The Metro line has trains of six 23 metres long cars but the stations have been constructed for easy alteration to enable eight car trains to be provided.  The cars were built by Alstom in India. The trains are numbered from the Sydney end DTC xx01 MPC xx03 MC xx05 MC xx06 MPC xx04 DTC xx02, where the "xx" represents the train set number from 01 to 22..The end cars are trailers but the intermediate cars are powered.

The running time for the all stations service including the ten intermediate station stops is 39-41 minutes. The average operating speed is 53 kph. The automatic station stopping pattern has the train stop for four to seven seconds before the doors open. The doors stay open for between 23 and 34 seconds with the train departing eight to nine seconds after the doors have closed. 

Peter

 

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, August 6, 2019 9:54 AM

If the Moderator tells me the three missing photos were deleted as result of a hack, and not becausse of any Kalmbach policy, I can repost them  --and also change my password!

Thanks for the description.   I'll pass it on to Ev.

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Posted by M636C on Tuesday, August 6, 2019 9:56 PM

daveklepper

 

 

The top photo shows (I think) Cherrybrook station.

A set of platform gates can be seen with plastic "fingers" projecting towards the car. These are intended to catch on anything, such as a passenger caught between the closing doors on the platform and train.

The second and third photos are at Kellyville station. The second is looking out the front window at the elevated track and the third out a side window at the opposite platform. Two unused gates intended for activation when eight car trains are introduced can be seen. The name "Kellyville" can be seen in white on the green stripe on the glass panels.

Peter

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Posted by M636C on Tuesday, August 6, 2019 10:12 PM

daveklepper

 

 

The first photo shows a passing train approaching on the section from Kellyville to Rouse Hill. The Metro has left hand running.

The second and third photos are at the terminus station of Tallawong. The track to the left will allow the addition of the third platform. The structure to the right is an emergency exit ramp only accessible when required. The passenger access at all stations is by elevators and escalators. A space for a future gate can be seen just forward of the car. The bridge beyond the platform carries Cunjegong Road (and provides a good location for photographing the trains entering the station. The fencing around the station makes photography of trains in the station difficult, although a couple of spots allow shots to be taken.

Tallawong is currently undeveloped but plans call for a major town centre just west of the station. It has a parking area for commuters from the surrounding area.

Provision has been made for an extension to Schofields on the (conventional) Richmond line.

 

Peter

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Posted by M636C on Tuesday, August 6, 2019 11:55 PM

To get an idea of the Metro and how it fits into the Sydney system, you could go to:

https://anytrip.com.au/

On starting it opens at the Sydney CBD.

First go to settings at the bottom of the left side window and deselect both city and regional buses. This just clears the screen a bit. Then using the "+/-" boxes at top left, reduce the scale until the wider system appears and move to the metro line in the lower north.

Clicking on a metro train tells you the train number, where it is and whether it is late.

The very short distance from Tallawong to Schofields can be seen from the map. Not obvious is that the depot is beyond Tallawong, occupying about half the distance to Schofields already.

Peter

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, August 7, 2019 2:17 AM

Peter, thanks for your help.   The potograph removed was of the same station as above, but did show more of the RoW.  I have now combined the two photos successfully and will post when at HU-wifi.

I am also obscuring the details of people in one of the two interior shops to insure the people arent recognisable, and wiil also post it when I can.

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, August 7, 2019 9:27 PM

still hope to have the two photos posted----

Peter, what headways are operated, and how many trains in service and how many not in wervice for maintenance?

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Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, August 7, 2019 10:13 PM

Here are the two photos 

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, August 8, 2019 12:53 AM

Thanks

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, August 8, 2019 4:43 AM

The missing photos were never missing?  They just didn't show up at the Yeshiva?. 

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Posted by M636C on Thursday, August 8, 2019 6:22 AM

daveklepper

still hope to have the two photos posted----

Peter, what headways are operated, and how many trains in service and how many not in service for maintenance?

 
There are 22 six car trains in use at startup of the service.
Right now using the Anytrip link I posted above seven trains are in service at 21:10 local time.
 
I am told that the line is designed for 15 trains an hour, so 4 minute headways in peak hours. I think the frequency is every ten minutes in the off peak.
 
The service is advertised as "Turn up and go", Station indicators show the time until the next train, and the trains show the time expected at major stations as far as the terminus.
 
With a good connection at Chatswood, I've made it from Tallawong to Sydney Central in one hour and five minutes.
 
I travelled on the second northbound train on the opening day.
 
 
Peter
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Posted by MidlandMike on Thursday, August 8, 2019 9:36 PM

Miningman

Here are the two photos 

 

The interior photo looks like you can see forever down the length of the car.  Are the 6 cars articulated with no sectional walls between cars?

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Posted by M636C on Thursday, August 8, 2019 10:16 PM

The interior photo looks like you can see forever down the length of the car.  Are the 6 cars articulated with no sectional walls between cars?

The cars are not articulated but have wide diaphragms between adjacent cars. This allows wheelchair access between cars and gives a clear view through the train. It also gives an interesting effect on curves in the tunnels, where no other indication of the track curvature is available.

Trains in Hong Kong and Singapore have similar wide diaphragms.

The end wall of the car in the photo can be seen just to the left of the second standee grab pole.

Peter

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Posted by daveklepper on Saturday, August 10, 2019 1:22 PM

40 minutes each way or 80 minutes round-trip and every ten minutes and seven trains have a contradiction.  Either:

Service is faster off-peak, with 70 minutes round-trip with less dwell-time at stations

or

Service is every twelve or fifteen miniutes, not every ten

or

There are eight trains in operation, not seven.

For every four-minute service and eighty-minute round-trip, twenty trains are required.   And more trains need to be added for the extension.

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