Philadelphia Trolley Tunnel Blitz 2019

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Philadelphia Trolley Tunnel Blitz 2019
Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, July 24, 2019 1:09 AM

Trolley Tunnel Blitz 2019

Trolley Tunnel Blitz

10 Day Trolley Tunnel Shutdown

STARTING Friday, August 9, 2019 at 10:00 p.m. and CONTINUING UNTIL Monday, August 19, 2019 at 5:00 a.m.
SEPTA will work around the clock tackling critical track and power maintenance and upgrades, station upgrades and painting, tile replacement, and maintenance work; and intensive tunnel, track area, and station cleaning as part of the 2019 Trolley Tunnel Blitz

Here's what we're doing during the 2019 Blitz

IN THE TRACK RIGHT OF WAY:

 Replacing Trolley Tunnel track curved rail along the Eastbound and Westbound sides of the Tunnel at 15th St and 36th Streets, and the Eastbound side at the 40th St portal (this helps to reduce the noise you hear when the Trolley travels through the Tunnel); Replacing the switch at the 40th St. Portal; aggressive cleaning campaign that includes vacuuming the entire track bed and drainage system and power washing the entire track bed at all stations and all of the track right of way




BRIDGES & BUILDINGS – STATION & TUNNEL WORK:

 Replacing old low pressure sodium light fixtures with new, high efficiency LED light fixtures in the tunnel between 36th & 37th Street Stations; Heavy cleaning, inspection, and maintenance at all stations including plumbing, tile, railings and partition screen repairs; painting; graffiti removal; and a major beam repair at 19th St. Station







COMMUNICATIONS & SIGNALS:

 Working in coordination with the Track Department, C&S will replace and upgrade track circuit and signal wires associated with the track work. They will inspect and complete maintenance on the entire signal system while replacing old incandescent lamps with new, higher efficiency LED lamps. C&S will also perform full maintenance on the track switches in the tunnel






POWER:

 Removing almost one mile of retired steel piping and communications cable in the tunnel between 19th and 22nd Streets. Replacing about one quarter mile of old wood overhead protection boards with a new fiberglass protection board system between 19th & 22nd Street. Working in coordination with the Track Department, Power will replace and upgrade rail return wires associated with the track work. Power will also perform heavy substation maintenance and cleaning; replacing all overhead section insulators in the tunnel; and testing and maintaining the emergency lighting backup power generation system


ADDITIONAL WORK:

 SEPTA will be installing and testing a new leak prevention method at two locations: near 33rd St. Westbound and between 36th and 37th Street Westbound Stations; and installing shielding at the roof of the tunnel to support future improvements at the 30th Street Market-Frankford Station. The SEPTA Key project will be installing and testing equipment at 33rd, 36th, & 37th Street Stations







Changes to Service

TROLLEYS WILL NOT OPERATE IN THE TUNNEL AT ANY TIME DURING THE BLITZ
    • Trolley Routes 10, 11*, 13, 34, and 36* will temporarily divert to 40th & Market Sts.

    • Customers may transfer at 40th St. to the Market Frankford Line for service to/from Center City
        • Tents will be available as a temporary shelter for customers transferring from Trolleys/Market Frankford Line
        • For late night travel, customers can transfer to Market-Frankford Line Weekday Night Owl Bus Service or the all-night Train service on weekends while this work takes place

  • Please look for signs posted at the 40th Street Portal and at stations for service information. Directional signage will help you navigate the system during the Blitz, with tips on how to access service during construction, stairway and station closures, and boarding information

Routes 11 & 36 are operating with modified service due to the Woodland Ave. Bridge Replacement Project. Customers should look for signage or visit TransitView for additional information.


WHY IS THE BLITZ NEEDED?

Giving SEPTA forces the opportunity to tackle maintenance, track construction, station facility, and safety improvement work in a concentrated period of time reduces the number of late night and weekend outages over the course of the year
On average, 700 vehicles operate through the five-mile Trolley Tunnel every day. As with previous Blitz campaigns starting in 2014, this work is scheduled during the summer when our ridership is traditionally lower in an effort to impact the fewest number of regular customers
We thank you for your cooperation and your patience while we continue our work to improve service, safety, and travel comfort in the Trolley Tunnel


IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION FOR CUSTOMERS DURING THE BLITZ

ALWAYS be aware of your surroundings and LOOK for signage posted at stations for boarding information. DO NOT enter areas that are gated or blocked off at any time. WE are committed to providing YOU with a safe riding experience and environment


Follow your Trolley Route on Twitter

 

@SEPTA_TRL_10 @SEPTA_TRL_34
@SEPTA_TRL_11 @SEPTA_TRL_36
@SEPTA_TRL_13  

 

40th Street Portal
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  • Member since
    January, 2001
  • From: Atlanta
  • 11,550 posts
Posted by oltmannd on Wednesday, July 24, 2019 6:18 AM

Interesting! Thanks for posting.  

I used to occasionally use the subway-surface line to get to work on rainy days.  Conrail's building was at 20th and Market.  The PATCO line terminus was about a half mile walk, but was not fun to do on rainy days.  I would check the weather while riding over the Ben Franklin Bridge and if it was raining too hard, jump off at 8th and Market, take the Market St line to 15th St, grab the the Subway-surface line trolley to 19th St and only have one block to walk in the rain.

I grabbed some video of the line in the mid-90s  https://youtu.be/hEhb9IWH2hw

 

-Don (Random stuff, mostly about trains - what else? http://blerfblog.blogspot.com/

  • Member since
    September, 2010
  • 1,660 posts
Posted by Electroliner 1935 on Saturday, July 27, 2019 11:08 PM

Don, Thanks for the video. I rode PATCO once on a trip to Phily and loved the streetcar like open operator area. Noticed the Engineer, (operator, motorman) use the dual buttons (door close, initiate trip) outbound but inbound, he used the throttle in manual mode. Curious, I asked why. And he explained that he wanted to keep his proficiency up because during normal (dry rail) conditions, the autobraking (fixed initiate point) worked fine but with wet rail, the braking rate was greater than the track could handle and the train would overshoot the platform. My question is that system still in operation? 

  • Member since
    January, 2001
  • From: Atlanta
  • 11,550 posts
Posted by oltmannd on Sunday, July 28, 2019 7:53 AM

Electroliner 1935

Don, Thanks for the video. I rode PATCO once on a trip to Phily and loved the streetcar like open operator area. Noticed the Engineer, (operator, motorman) use the dual buttons (door close, initiate trip) outbound but inbound, he used the throttle in manual mode. Curious, I asked why. And he explained that he wanted to keep his proficiency up because during normal (dry rail) conditions, the autobraking (fixed initiate point) worked fine but with wet rail, the braking rate was greater than the track could handle and the train would overshoot the platform. My question is that system still in operation? 

 

Yes, as far as I know.  They would typically operate manually during off-peak hours and use the ATC during peak hours when there were tight headways.

They just finished getting all the cars back from rebuilding.  They've enclosed the operator's cab in each car.  The stated reason is some "passengers" were making a mess of the area in the trailing cabs. 

-Don (Random stuff, mostly about trains - what else? http://blerfblog.blogspot.com/

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