Wuppertal, Germany suspended railway (video)

1250 views
13 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    June, 2009
  • From: Dallas, TX
  • 3,411 posts
Wuppertal, Germany suspended railway (video)
Posted by CMStPnP on Sunday, August 12, 2018 10:38 AM

Always fun to watch this in Germany either from the DB passing underneath or when driving in the city.   Surprised more people do not model this in HO Scale.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AaDDd4Rixi4

 

  • Member since
    December, 2008
  • From: Toronto, Canada
  • 1,295 posts
Posted by 54light15 on Monday, August 13, 2018 9:25 AM

I've ridden it several times, it's pretty awesome! In Wuppertal there is a brew pub built in the former public swimming pool; the bottom of the pool has been leveled and that's where the bar is. Brewing equipment is behind the diving boards. A nice place and you can ride the monorail to get there. 

  • Member since
    September, 2014
  • 77 posts
Posted by JC UPTON on Monday, August 13, 2018 9:40 AM

Very Interesting; one question...

Where is (are) the electric supply & return connections?

from the Far East of the Sunset Route

(In the shadow of the Huey P Long bridge)

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • 302,135 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, August 13, 2018 1:38 PM

Here is a photo of the front of a train: http://hellertal.startbilder.de/1200/der-wsw-gtw-72-dreiteiliger-479954.jpg

The energy supply is a 2nd rail. In the photo it is directly beside the running rail. You can see the insulator. Originally the 2nd rail carried 600 VDC. With the latest train generation it was increased to 750 VDC.

The running rail is also the return conductor.

Here is a photo of a switch/turnout showing running rail and 2nd rail as section:
https://www.golocal.de/wuppertal/stadtverwaltung/stadt-wuppertal-rathaus-stadtteile-YUtXh/fotos/?p=18

I hope that helps.
Regards, Volker

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • 6,375 posts
Posted by Overmod on Monday, August 13, 2018 2:18 PM

Makes me thirsty for Barmen Brauerei Bier.

One interesting thing I remember when I first saw this firsthand about 1973 was how dramatically different the then-'new' 2001-A-Space-Odyssey industrial design of the 'new' cars was from the old varnished-teak opulence of the 'old' cars then still in service.

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • 302,135 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, August 13, 2018 4:07 PM
  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Georgia USA SW of Atlanta
  • 8,949 posts
Posted by blue streak 1 on Monday, August 13, 2018 5:02 PM

Volker what is its MAS ?  Does it suffer the madly of mono rail trains being dnamically unstable above ~ 35 MPH ?

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • 302,135 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, August 13, 2018 5:26 PM

What does the abbreviation MAS stand for?

blue streak 1

Volker what is its MAS ?  Does it suffer the madly of mono rail trains being dnamically unstable above ~ 35 MPH ?

 

The maximum speed is 37 mph.

Sorry, I'm not familiar with the technical limitations of the suspended monorail system.
Regards, Volker

  • Member since
    July, 2010
  • From: Louisiana
  • 1,623 posts
Posted by Paul of Covington on Monday, August 13, 2018 10:47 PM

   Between 5:50 and 6:20 in the original video there are several platforms(?) suspended over the river beneath the tracks.  What is their purpose?

_____________

   "A stranger is just a friend you ain't met yet."  ___ Dave Gardner

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • 302,135 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, August 14, 2018 3:15 AM

That are work platforms. Here is one used to exchange rubber buffers at the running rail. https://www.wsw-online.de/fileadmin/Unternehmen/Presseinformationsmaterial/-_WSW-th-170706_Hilfsbru_%C3%AAcke_Gummiwechsel-23.jpg

That is done at night when no trains run. The platform is raised and, as it looks for me, clamped against the structure. The rubber buffers are a noise prevention measure: https://www.wsw-online.de/fileadmin/Unternehmen/Presseinformationsmaterial/-_WSW-th-170706_Hilfsbru_%C3%AAcke_Gummiwechsel-8.jpg

Regards, Volker

  • Member since
    July, 2010
  • From: Louisiana
  • 1,623 posts
Posted by Paul of Covington on Tuesday, August 14, 2018 2:27 PM

   Wow!  The provisions for maintenance are as impressive as the main structure itself.   The platforms when lowered appear to be supported by cables attached only at the center.  Are there provisions to keep them from rocking and swaying in a strong breeze?  I have a million questions, but I don't want to bother you with them now, and anyway I don't know where to begin.   Thank you.

_____________

   "A stranger is just a friend you ain't met yet."  ___ Dave Gardner

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • 302,135 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, August 14, 2018 3:03 PM

I don't know the Wuppertal suspended monorail personally. There is a lot of information in the internet but sadly not everything.

One that isn't is how they secure the work platform. You are right the platforms are supported in the center.

Ask your questions, only I'm not sure that I can answer them but I'll try.
Regards, Volker

  • Member since
    December, 2008
  • From: Toronto, Canada
  • 1,295 posts
Posted by 54light15 on Tuesday, August 14, 2018 4:59 PM

Have a look at this- Wuppertal 1969 with streetcars and trolleybuses! does anyone remember them? 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hzo4Q7REA1s 

  • Member since
    June, 2002
  • 14,308 posts
Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, August 15, 2018 3:50 AM

I do. When I rode the line in 1960, there was still one local Wuppertal streetcarline running, which paralleled the river and the hanging railway for about a mile.  Signs of an abandoned branch were in evidennce.  But from the east end of the monrail line, not reached by the strandard gauge steetcar line that used typical three-truck, two-serction Duwag single-end (I think?) trams, the was also a meter-gauge interuruban line than went somewhere else, Duisberg?  I didn't have time to ride it.   Had already ridden the standard gauge line when I saw it.   The interurban car I saw seemed similar to the standard Belgian Vicinal double-truck lightweight interurban cars.

Join our Community!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

Search the Community

Newsletter Sign-Up

By signing up you may also receive occasional reader surveys and special offers from Trains magazine.Please view our privacy policy