NYCity buses to photograph violators of bus-only lanes automatically

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NYCity buses to photograph violators of bus-only lanes automatically
Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, October 3, 2019 8:11 AM

Forward plan <https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5afef986c3c16a2dc6705929/t/5b072571f950b7a5e621a4ff/1527194994914/Fast+Forward+Plan_05-24-2018_3.15PM.pdf>
to improve bus service, increase bus speeds and attract new ridership.
Results so far have yielded faster bus speeds by as much as 19% on a
portion of Fifth Avenue and as much as 30% near the Hugh L. Carey
Tunnel’s Manhattan approach. Other strategies include redesigning
every borough’s bus network to better meet customer needs, installing
traffic signal priority technology, implementing more transit priority
street designs, and deploying new modern buses with better reliability
and customer amenities.

A sample warning is available here.
<https://apps.cio.ny.gov/apps/mediaContact/public/download.cfm?attachment_uuid=7D135EE5-5056-907F-6FF78A8AC297505C>

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, October 3, 2019 8:16 AM

The "Forward Plan" has a signal system improvement plan that has an error, involving the "1" and the "R" south of Canal Street.  This shows the correction:

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, October 3, 2019 9:15 AM

deleted

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, December 9, 2019 3:29 AM

MTA Bus-Mounted Camera Program Begins Issuing Bus Lane Violations on M15 SBS Route
Bus Lane Violators on 1st & 2nd Avenues Now Subject to Graduated Fine Structure up to $250
Bus Speeds on M15 Route Increase Up to 34% Since Oct. as a Result of Automated Bus Lane Enforcement Program
 
NYC Transit Launches Bus Lane Awareness Campaign – View “Are You a Bus?” 
Ads Here
 
The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) announced that the 60-day warning period for bus lane blockers on the M15 Select Bus Service route ends on Friday, Dec. 6, and motorists who are caught by the MTA’s new bus-mounted cameras will now receive violations with fines up to $250. 
The forward-facing cameras on buses serving the M15 SBS route on First and Second Avenues in Manhattan were implemented on Oct. 7. State legislation mandated a 60-day grace period before violators are fined for standing or parking in the bus lanes. Since camera enforcement on the M15 began, there have been improvements in bus speeds on First and Second Avenues, with increases of up to 34% in some segments.  The primary indicator of bus reliability, Wait Assessment, is at 76.7% on the route – the highest it’s been for the past 15 months. 
Enforced bus lanes are key to improving bus service, and to heighten awareness of their use, NYC Transit is launching an awareness campaign targeted to motorists. The new campaign features “Are you a bus?” posters noting that “Bus lanes are for buses,” which will be posted on the backs of the buses equipped with ABLE camera systems. The posters will be installed on those buses this month, and the campaign will continue as NYC Transit expands the ABLE program. NYC Transit is working with the NYC DOT to implement transit priority across the city, including the recently announced City commitment to 50 miles of protected bus lanes annually for the next five years. 
“Keeping bus lanes clear is key to improving bus service and traffic flow for everyone,” said Craig Cipriano, Acting MTA Bus Company President and Senior Vice President for Buses of NYC Transit. “After 60 days of warnings and lots of reminders on the First and Second Avenue bus lanes, we are moving forward with tough love: Stay out of the bus lane, or you’ll pay for it.” 
“DOT has committed to speeding up buses citywide – and to get there, we need to continue stepping up automated bus lane enforcement,” said DOT Commissioner Polly Trottenberg. “The new enforcement cameras on the buses will complement DOT’s fixed cameras already along the route -- further helping us keep bus lanes clear and allowing tens of thousands of commuters who rely on the M15 a faster, more reliable ride from the Financial District to East Harlem.” 
NYC Transit is currently using the Automated Bus Lane Enforcement (ABLE) system on buses serving the M15 SBS, B44 SBS and M14 SBS routes. The B44 SBS travels on approximately 10 miles of dedicated bus lanes through Brooklyn, while the M14 SBS uses bus lanes on 14th Street as well as NYC DOT’s Truck and Transit Priority lanes. Motorists who remain in a bus lane without exiting at the first possible right turn, or are captured as blocking the bus lane at the same location by two successive buses, are considered to be violating traffic laws and will be ticketed. 
The ABLE camera systems capture evidence such as license plate information, photos and videos, as well as location and timestamp information, of vehicles obstructing bus lanes to document clear cases of bus lane violation. The system collects multiple pieces of evidence to ensure that vehicles making permitted turns from bus lanes are not ticketed. This information is transmitted to NYC DOT for review and processing, and the program is administered in partnership with NYC DOT and the NYC Department of Finance. Beginning Dec. 6, motorists who are caught by the bus-mounting cameras blocking bus lanes on First and Second Avenues will be subject to a fine of $50 for the first violation. For additional violations within a 12-month period, fines are $100 for a second offense, $150 for a third offense, $200 for a fourth offense, and $250 for a fifth violation and each subsequent one within a 12-month period. 
While NYC DOT has been using stationary fixed-position cameras on streets for years to capture vehicles that do not make the first available turn off a bus lane, the MTA’s bus-mounted cameras capture vehicles standing for long periods or parked in a bus lane. The two systems complement each other and work in tandem to ensure that violators are not fined twice for the same offense. NYPD provide additional enforcement through its Clear Lanes initiative, which uses traffic enforcement agents, tow trucks and ride-alongs with NYCT Bus personnel to target bus-lane blocking hotspots.  
The bus-mounted ABLE systems are installed on 123 MTA buses across the three bus routes. The proposed 2020-2024 MTA Capital Plan includes $85 million for further expansion of the program. 
Bus lanes and their enforcement have proven to improve bus speeds in highly congested areas, helping to double bus speeds while increasing other vehicle speeds by 5 percent on a portion of Fresh Pond Road in Queens, increasing bus speeds by as much as 19 percent on a portion of Fifth Avenue and as much as 30 percent near the Manhattan approach of the Hugh L. Carey Tunnel. Close collaboration with NYC DOT is a key element of NYC Transit’s Fast Forward plan to improve bus service, improve bus speeds and attract new ridership. Other strategies include redesigning each borough’s bus network to better meet customer needs, installing traffic signal priority technology at intersections and on buses and replacing the existing fleet with new state-of-the-art buses with improved reliability and amenities.
 
 
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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Monday, December 9, 2019 7:16 AM

Chicago has a similar problem with autos infringing on bus-only lanes.  The one method that will succeed is to establish a counter-flow lane for buses on paired one-way streets.  It was tried in Chicago about 35 years ago with routes serving Chicago Union Station and it did improve bus timekeeping.  It was discontinued after a few years over pedestrian safety issues.

San Juan has a fair amount of counterflow lane arrangements and they seem to work quite nicely.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by Flintlock76 on Tuesday, December 10, 2019 2:48 PM

Hey, you know what they should bo with those NYC buses?

Put a full-face photo of Mayor DeBlasio on the front with the caption "Big Brother Is Watching You!"  lettered backwards so errant drivers can read it in their rear-view mirrors!  

That'll warn 'em!  Assuming they're not too busy texting while driving.

Or something.

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Posted by Electroliner 1935 on Thursday, December 12, 2019 6:28 PM

CSSHEGEWISCH
It was tried in Chicago about 35 years ago with routes serving Chicago Union Station and it did improve bus timekeeping.  It was discontinued after a few years over pedestrian safety issues.

People kept looking for cars going in the usual direction and could not comprehend that a bus would be coming the other way on a "one way" street. All the signs and markings could not prevent them from walking in front of an oncoming bus. People get set in their ways and have a hard time changing. Ever get in the habit of catching a commuter train that always departs from track 2 and one day that track is OOS and the crowd control can't handle the 1500 people who need to find it on track 6. What a circus. Not to mention the people who used to board a different train on track 6.

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