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cp 1800-1803 E8A's

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cp 1800-1803 E8A's
Posted by NP Eddie on Wednesday, March 31, 2021 4:33 PM

The CP purchased three E-units for Montreal to USA service. I remember that they were ordered as E7's, but that production ended and E8's were supplied. Were those train destined to Boston or New York City?

Did the Canadian government allow the CP to purchase USA locomotives due to an international pool? Didn't the BM and MEC participate in that pool also.

Ed Burns

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Posted by SD70Dude on Wednesday, March 31, 2021 5:09 PM

Canadian railroads were always able to purchase American-built locomotives, but would pay steep tariffs to do so. 

You are correct that these units were purchased as CP's contribution to dieselizing the Montreal-Boston passenger trains they jointly operated with B&M.

CP's three E-units were built before the GMD London plant opened.  CN had also acquired a small number of EMD units that were built at La Grange.  

As built CP 1800-1802 wore a unique paint scheme that was not applied to any other CPR diesels:

https://www.trains.com/ctr/photos-videos/photo-of-the-day/canadian-pacific-e8-with-the-alouette/

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, April 2, 2021 9:25 AM

The three CP E8s were purcased specifically for Boston - Montreal service for the Red Wing (overnight. with Pullman sleepers) and Allouette (day) in a pool with B&M E-7s and the one B&M E-8.

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Posted by cv_acr on Friday, April 2, 2021 9:33 AM

SD70Dude
Canadian railroads were always able to purchase American-built locomotives, but would pay steep tariffs to do so.

 

Exactly. Nothing stopped Canadian railways from purchasing stuff from the US, but import duties financially incentivized built-in-Canada. That changed with NAFTA.

Customs and import is also why CP had those Pullman-Standard built boxcars with "International of Maine" lettering and later the "international" CPAA reporting marks. These were US cars, acquired in the US and not imported to Canada. Under customs/import rules these were American cars, and handled the same as cars from US domestic railways.

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, April 2, 2021 9:34 AM

The Alouette headed for Boston at Concord, NH, Spring 1950 or 1951:

 

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