If American Locomotive Company is out of business then where do Alco operators get aftermarket parts?

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If American Locomotive Company is out of business then where do Alco operators get aftermarket parts?
Posted by CandOforprogress2 on Friday, July 06, 2018 10:59 AM

Alco is still being used by a dozen or so short line RR. So other then butchering existing locos who makes parts for these beasts?

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Posted by NorthWest on Sunday, July 08, 2018 8:46 PM

DLW in India still produces new parts (and at least up until a couple of years ago, complete locomotives), and Fairbanks-Morse still makes 251 engines.

New parts are still around.

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Posted by M636C on Monday, July 09, 2018 12:06 AM

NorthWest

DLW in India still produces new parts (and at least up until a couple of years ago, complete locomotives), and Fairbanks-Morse still makes 251 engines.

New parts are still around.

 

 

As of 21 March 2018, DLW are still building Alco locomotives:

https://www.financialexpress.com/infrastructure/railways/indian-railways-supplies-18-make-in-india-locomotives-to-myanmar-locos-made-in-varanasis-dlw/1106049/

This is a DL535, known in India as a YDM4.

It is generally similar to the DL535s supplied by Alco and MLW to the White Pass and Yukon, but has microprocessor control and a new dynamic brake installation in the short hood.

Myanmar is generally better known as Burma...

The DF prefix indicates a six motor locomotive.

Peter

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Posted by NorthWest on Monday, July 09, 2018 12:25 AM

Thanks. The last one I had heard about was the 2016-built Myanmar units.

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Posted by jrbernier on Wednesday, July 11, 2018 8:34 PM

  FM bought the Alco 251 series.  They produce them, and sell parts...

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Thursday, July 12, 2018 6:59 AM

FM was smart to acquire the 251 design.  The 251 engine still sees a fair amount of use in stationary and marine applications.

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Posted by Backshop on Thursday, July 12, 2018 1:23 PM

Many parts were bough from suppliers, the electrical gear as the best example.  Just because the erector went out of business didn't mean the supplier did, also.

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Posted by M636C on Thursday, July 12, 2018 8:03 PM

Backshop

Many parts were bought from suppliers, the electrical gear as the best example.  Just because the erector went out of business didn't mean the supplier did, also.

 
As a deliberate policy, the Indian government adopted the Alco design because Alco were willing to licence the construction of the whole locomotive including the diesel engine. EMD would not allow licence construction of the engine, and missed out on the long term orders.
 
To be honest, while GT16 was probably at least as good as the DL560, maybe better, the GA12C was a clumsy adaptation of the GA8. It didn't help that the DL535 was one Alco's best products, high power (1200HP) from the 6-251D, assisted by air to air intercooling (as used on recent GE T3 and T4 engines). There is a reason that they are still building DL 535s for sale this year.
 
It seems that India went with the British AEI equipment rather than GE. AEI incorporated GE's British subsidiary British Thomson Houston. It is pbably worth recalling that the "tom" in Alstom, originally Alsthom, came from Thomson Houston too.
 
AEI often adopted new features, better insulation, earlier than GE.
 
Turbochargers from Napier and ABB are used in place of the old Alco designs.
 
These Indian products could keep US Alcos running for many years to come...
 
Peter
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Posted by SD70Dude on Thursday, July 12, 2018 9:51 PM

M636C

British AEI equipment

I take it that AEI is/was a electrical equipment manufacturer.

To North American railroaders the initials "AEI" stand for Automatic Equipment Identification, that is the RFID tags on rolling stock and trackside scanners.

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Posted by M636C on Friday, July 13, 2018 12:07 AM

AEI stood for Associated Electrical Industries

(or just to be confusing, in Australia, for a while, Australian Electrical Industries, using the same brand logo... until the English name was used in Australia)

I think AEI was the result of the merger of British Thomson-Houston (as noted above) and Metropolitan Vickers, another British electrical company with origins in the Metropolitan Carriage and Wagon Company and Vickers, the shipbuilder and armament manufacturer. M-V were tied up with Beyer Peacock as well...

This merged later with the General Electric Company (no relation at all to the USA GE, that was BT-H, remember) to form GEC-AEI, and later just GEC again. About then English Electric was taken over as well. That GEC merged with Alsthom or Alstom depending on when it happened.

Confusing the letters is the least of your problem.

But as Associated Electrical Industries, it supplied a lot of equipment for Alco powered locomotives designed by both Alco and MLW.

Peter

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Posted by Firelock76 on Saturday, July 14, 2018 5:42 PM

Look at it this way, if there's a demand for parts, and a need for parts, someone, somewhere is going to fill that need.  That's what capitalism's all about.

Not quite the same thing, but pick up a copy of "Hemmings Motor News" sometime and look at all the ads for new-manufactured aftermarket parts for automobile restorers, all makes and models and time periods.  It'll amaze you.  It amazed me!

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