Old MLWs keeping chugging along..

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  • Member since
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  • From: Guelph, Ontario
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Old MLWs keeping chugging along..
Posted by Ulrich on Wednesday, April 11, 2018 8:49 PM

Ontario Southland is still running its fleet of MLWs, including RS18s and an M420, among others. Anyone else still running first generation MLW or Alcos in revenue generating service?  Too bad their second generation offerings weren't more reliable.. Canada would likely still be in the locomotive business had the M630/M636 measured up to the SD40-2. 

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Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, April 11, 2018 9:39 PM

Your statement is factually wrong and confusing. Plenty of old Geeps and GMD switchers, built in Canada, still are running. GMD London built locomotives until 2005 in London, Ontario, including the SD40-2. 

When ALCO packed it up it only did so in the USA as their Montreal Locomotive Works kept it all going for a considerable length of time, and with great success. Bombardier then stepped in and it became MLW/Bombadier for a while, still all Canadian made.

Now it's just Bombadier, who moved to trainsets, not mainline freight hauling locomotives. Still made in Canada though. 

Also first generation AlCO/MLW locomotives would be FA's, RS series 1,2,3, RS10 and numerous switchers.  I would call a M420 and an RS18 solidly into second generation territory. 

I do know what you mean though...GMD sold to what eventually was Caterpillar who then shut down the London plant. 

Wether or not mainline Freight locomotives are manufacquired once again in Canada is unknown, especially in light of whats happening at GE. We certainly have the infrastructure, plants and ability to do so. 

 

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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, April 11, 2018 10:02 PM

While you are on the general subject, what was the range of years that EMD was building PREFERENTIALLY in the London plant, and not in LaGrange?

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Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, April 11, 2018 10:20 PM

[quote user="Overmod"]

While you are on the general subject, what was the range of years that EMD was building PREFERENTIALLY in the London plant, and not in LaGrange?

 

Would say 1989-2005...definitely 1991-2005

Had a girlfriend who worked there for many years at the London plant.

They said the guys left down at LaGrange played cards with a light bulb hanging down above them all day long. Could just be a story, but the plant was essentially closed but Union rules had a skeleton crew remain.

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Posted by cx500 on Wednesday, April 11, 2018 11:54 PM

Ulrich: 

The Great Western in southern Saskatchewan still has several M420s that are used along with the GEs.  There are also some RS-18s to be found in the same province of Wabush/Arnaud heritage.  Out on the Gaspe peninsula operations use ex-CP RS-18s.  South of the border more RS-18s and FPA-4s can be found.

Of course, the M420s are normally considered 2nd generation.

Anyway, get the current issue of Canadian Trackside Guide and it will provide the answers to your question (and a lot more).

John

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  • From: Guelph, Ontario
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Posted by Ulrich on Thursday, April 12, 2018 7:33 AM

That's right, M420s are of course second generation. My bad. 

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Posted by YoHo1975 on Friday, April 13, 2018 4:09 PM

[quote user="Miningman"]

Overmod

While you are on the general subject, what was the range of years that EMD was building PREFERENTIALLY in the London plant, and not in LaGrange?

 

Would say 1989-2005...definitely 1991-2005

Had a girlfriend who worked there for many years at the London plant.

They said the guys left down at LaGrange played cards with a light bulb hanging down above them all day long. Could just be a story, but the plant was essentially closed but Union rules had a skeleton crew remain.

 

 

LaGrange was still the diesel engine manufacturing line, so clearly they weren't sitting around playing cards. It was also still Division HQ and R&D

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