Electric loco parts

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Electric loco parts
Posted by Enzoamps on Thursday, January 18, 2018 12:22 AM

Some boxcab type electric locomotives have round vertical posts or pillars on the front and rear "porches".  What are they?  Sand tanks?  Protective posts for the crew, like the posts in front of post offices?

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Thursday, January 18, 2018 1:34 AM

Enzoamps

Some boxcab type electric locomotives have round vertical posts or pillars on the front and rear "porches".  What are they?  Sand tanks?  Protective posts for the crew, like the posts in front of post offices?

 

 

Yes, the pillars on the porches are for sand.

MUCH, much more could be said about this style of locomotive.

Sand Boxes rectangular here, and located for same reason.
 

http://www.railarchive.net/nyccollection/images/ple9090_wk.jpg

 

Thank You.

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, January 18, 2018 12:44 PM

NDG
Enzoamps

Some boxcab type electric locomotives have round vertical posts or pillars on the front and rear "porches".  What are they?

 Yes, the pillars on the porches are for sand.

With respect, those are AWFULLY heavy tanks, with very substantial bolted access ports at the bottom, to be sandboxes on a NYC T2b.  I think they might be oil switches for the adjacent third-rail pickups; you will note in other pictures of T-motors that they are located all the way at the inside end of the 'monkey deck' platform, which is NOT where they'd be if containing traction sand.

Bet the NYCSHS, or Sam Berliner III, would know this!

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Thursday, January 18, 2018 2:09 PM

 

Thank You Mr. Overmod for your correction! I stand corrected!
 
I SHOULD have looked into it more re powered axles and all that.
 
The pick up shoe and fuses are right there, as U said.
 
We saw these Motors aeons ago on a trip to NYC on NYC long before the Merger.
 
The big CUT Motors made an awful shriek from cooling fans within and Es in the Grey marched off to Albany and the West on The Water Level Route as God intended.
 
The first trip down ex Montreal was behind steam, on CP/NJ/D&H/NYC.
 
CHRIST! These hung on for ever. THIS one is lettered PC!!
 
 
But, these are sand boxes??? ( Hee, Hee, Hee! )
 
 
It was later I REALIZED this is an NYC locomotive, too!
 
There is a photo of Central Babyface Baldwins shoving a hump somewhere as they were less that satisfactory out on the Main
 
We all lost more than just steam.
 
Albany.
 
 
 
Learn something every day, thanks to Experts!
 

Thank You, Sir!!

 

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, January 18, 2018 2:30 PM

NDG
There is a photo of Central Babyface Baldwins shoving a hump somewhere as they were less that satisfactory out on the Main

Not sure there wasn't some of that Schenectady bias in there, but NYC had very grim results with Baldwins as road power (perhaps Sharks included).  Worst of them all had to be the Gravel Gerties, which had a large range of answers to questions nobody asked in their 'design' in addition to the usual Baldwin steam-locomotive construction detailing.  I remember a story about a road crew in the twilight of one of the babyface cabs who were fishing off a bridge of some sort, noting the amount of oil and perhaps other fluids steadily drip-drip-dripping down into the water.  (Probably getting there by way of the oil bath thoughtfully provided for the electrical cabling under the deck...)

Might have been interesting to see how a full 6000hp Essl unit might have fared in long-term service, eight high-speed engines each driving just one axle.  With '30s-style slip control.  Like an early version of the joke about the American space shuttle: a million moving parts all supplied by the lowest bidder...

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, January 18, 2018 2:41 PM

The last of the S-motors held on much longer than any P-motor, if I remember correctly, even that last P with lightning stripes they had out in the weeds at Harmon for so long.  I saw one active switching GCT in the early 1980s, as unbelievable in a way as seeing William Wilgus' ghost.

Funny, but I don't remember serious fan noise from the Ps when they were the 'standard' PC passenger power between GCT and Harmon in the very early 1970s.  It was fun to listen to the various mechanical noises produced by the 567s of the E units and FL9s as they were repeatedly notched up and wheezingly idled to gain momentum ... I was just a kid then, and thought that was how ALL passenger power sounded accelerating a train; what else did I have to compare it with  that was better than the Water Level Route?

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Posted by Firelock76 on Thursday, January 18, 2018 5:03 PM

Were any of those NYC S-motors preserved?  Truly a remarkable machine, especially when you consider they entered service when Teddy Roosevelt was in the White House and then lasted right up to the Spage Age!

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Friday, January 19, 2018 7:12 AM

The S-motors lasted as long as they did for a variety of reasons.  They were used in low-speed light-duty service as passenger switchers and their gearless motors eliminated a lot of parts that would wear out.  They made a virtue out of being low-tech.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by Overmod on Friday, January 19, 2018 7:50 AM

NDG
http://www.railarchive.net/nyccollection/images/ple9090_wk.jpg

It was later I REALIZED this is an NYC locomotive, too!

If I'm not mistaken, there's a clip of this locomotive under steam, going across the Castleton Cutoff high bridge, in that recent YouTube clip of "NYC Steam 1928-1929" (or whatever it's called; the thumbnail shows a steam locomotive traversing the approach to the trusses).  It's not very long, but if you know what you're looking at, impressive.

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Posted by Randy Stahl on Friday, January 19, 2018 12:44 PM

Overmod
 
NDG
Enzoamps

Some boxcab type electric locomotives have round vertical posts or pillars on the front and rear "porches".  What are they?

 Yes, the pillars on the porches are for sand.

 

With respect, those are AWFULLY heavy tanks, with very substantial bolted access ports at the bottom, to be sandboxes on a NYC T2b.  I think they might be oil switches for the adjacent third-rail pickups; you will note in other pictures of T-motors that they are located all the way at the inside end of the 'monkey deck' platform, which is NOT where they'd be if containing traction sand.

Bet the NYCSHS, or Sam Berliner III, would know this!

 

I go with sandboxes. I don't know why you would need oil switches for 600 VDC. I assume each motor is protected with ribbon fuses and I see the canopy fuse hanging there.

Randy

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Friday, January 19, 2018 2:51 PM

Overmod

If I'm not mistaken,

 

 
Dear Sir!
 
It IS a small WORLD!!
 
I ( and the Kat, crouched on top of the back of the chair, purring, and being nosey. He likes the funny cat videos on YouTube and HATES Cucumbers { Don't tell anyone. Like the contact lenses, He is very touchy about HIS weaknesses } ) were watching that clip two nights ago.
 
 
 
F-M Cab Unit, here. Repowered?
 
 
Amazing road, The Central!!  Great bridge, too!! Looked Cold!
 
Taking water from a trough at - 25 F!!!
 
Steam Dummy Shays w a flagman on a horse. Oil Firing in summer in the Adrondacks, and Grand Central Terminal, WTC abuilding when I was last there, home w a PA from Albany.
 
On my first visit to NYC we traveled by Subway. Ancient sliding door cars and all, and rode an Elevated, c. 1950.
 
Awesome, Dude!
 
Great films on the Central on the Internet, and many other once-great roads.  The film on the GNRy. We visited the big shop at Hillyard and they had just put out a kit bashed SD40-2 B in BN Green. Nothing there, now. A Cheesy display featuring a small 0-4-0 critter, and a fire truck.
 
 
These films have lots of data for modellers adding detail such as standpipes, coal chutes, etc.
 
The Central used to pass the end of our street well into the PC era, a sea of 244 junk and dripping oil, and not even Baldwins, near the end, via Adirondack Jct. @ Seaway on the CPR.
 
But there were Big Alcos w Hiad Trucks, also.
 
The first factory low nose locomotive I ever saw was D&H 5012. When it was new.
 
 
D&H had the C628s, as did LV.
 
Yes! Those old films are wonderful to view, and we spend hours watching them in the middle of the night to fight back the Demons of the Past and of mistakes made, and people hurt.
 
Amazing.
 
Thank You.
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Posted by bratkinson on Thursday, January 25, 2018 11:18 PM

Those cylindrical sand boxes were also used on the Illinois Terminal system on the Class C freight motors.  Class D's were higher horsepower Class Cs but the front and rear 'decks' were enclosed to provide improved ventillation to the motors on each of the 4 axles front and rear giving the locomotive a B-B+B-B arrangement in 'diesel' terms.

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, January 29, 2018 6:33 AM

Randy Stahl
I don't know why you would need oil switches for 600 VDC. I assume each motor is protected with ribbon fuses and I see the canopy fuse hanging there.

Upon further reflection I would suggest part of the MU gear.  

I have no objection to it being sandboxes, but the heavy construction and location changing over their service life don't indicate that.  So I would want to see close detail with valves and sanding lines, or a clear diagram or detail drawing, before agreeing.

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