The Juice train

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The Juice train
Posted by Mario_v on Saturday, April 13, 2013 9:52 AM

Hello all;

Here's a video showing onne of the most distinguished trains of the North East, the Tropicana Juice train. The Route seems to be Former ACL 'Sarasosta Branch', then the ex ACL main up untill Richmond, the former RF&P, Washington Belt Line (that's what I call it) and finally, the ex B&O/CNJ. For a hotshot, it doesn't seems to be very fast (60 mph maximum)

watch?v=sb8mk2HSJUc&feature=youtu.be

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Posted by trainfan1221 on Saturday, April 13, 2013 12:26 PM

Haven't seen this train in years but it runs on a local railroad I used to railfan a lot. I'll have to get back over there. Thanks for the video.

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Posted by NittanyLion on Saturday, April 13, 2013 3:09 PM

I see it a couple times a week and it never does seem very quick.  Its actually slower than a lot of trains that go through, but...everything seems to be roughly the same during the day and much faster at night.

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Posted by Firelock76 on Saturday, April 13, 2013 3:43 PM

I see the Juice Train passing through Richmond  often.  By the time it gets to the Staples Mill Road Amtrak station area it's doing about 35 MPH, although sometimes it's stopped there as well, I assume awaiting clearance.   North of the station it typically runs as fast as track conditions permit.

Here's a new wrinkle: It used to be  "All Tropicana, All The The Time!"   Now in addition to 35 to 45 Tropicana cars, there's anywhere from 20 to 30 container flats tacked on the tail end, sometimes as many as the Tropicana cars.

At her old job here, Lady Firestorm had to time her commute just right or risk being help up by the Juice Train at the Hungary Road grade crossing.  She wasn't held up that long, it usually only took about two minutes to pass.  She didn't mind the hold up all that much, it's a fascinating train to see.

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Posted by rfpjohn on Sunday, April 14, 2013 3:34 AM

The "juice" now runs combined with a block of Orlando pigs to and from Florida. When you see it passing Greendale station, it's observing the 25mph max authorized speed for freight in Richmond terminal. Once it is north of Greendale interlocking, the maximum authorized speed for that equipment is 60mph on the R.F.& P.

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Posted by Bruce LA on Monday, April 15, 2013 4:45 AM

I was a conductor for CSX based out of Wildwood, FL between 2001-2002 and would work the Juice Train every now and then. Nice easy job and it brought out all the rail fans as it ran through the Wildwood sub during the day. Never traveled vary fast due to all the speed restrictions. It always had the newest power so the cab was air conditioned. 

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Posted by Mario_v on Tuesday, April 16, 2013 12:25 PM

I've been seeing both a florence and a Baltimore subdivision ETTs and the maximum permissible speed is 60 Mph for general freight, wich seems to be the case. One curiosity : despite ATK trains now being slower than their ACL conterparts of  yesteryear (79 vs 85/90 Mph, or even 100 between 1955 and 1957), route times don't differ much in certain areas (especially Rocky Mount to Petersburg on the Northbound Carolinian). Maybe there are less speed restrictions now?

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Posted by John WR on Saturday, April 27, 2013 2:16 AM

What happens to the Juice Train once it gets to Jersey City?  

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Posted by denveroutlaws06 on Saturday, April 27, 2013 7:35 PM

it gets unloaded and sent back.

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Posted by Firelock76 on Sunday, April 28, 2013 9:26 AM

Typically it doesn't go home as a unit.  After unloading the cars go back as part of regular freight consists, several to the train.

Sometimes they come home with more graffitti on them then they go north with.  The "artists"  find those big white sides an irresistable canvas.  So much for railyard security.

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Posted by rfpjohn on Sunday, April 28, 2013 1:38 PM

Actually, for the past decade or so, the juice cars have travelled back to florida as a unit. Years ago they were sent back on the 109, later 409, mostly as the rear cars of the train. They started running as a seperate train, 141, later 741 at least 10 years ago. There was a short period of time during which a smal block of "hot cars" were added to the rear out of north jersey. You had to look over your paper work carefully when you caught one of these blocks,as often the cars in this block were restricted to lower speeds than that allowed for the juice cars. As I stated in an earlier post, the juice cars are now combined with a block of Orlando pigs as train 121 or 141. You may occasionally see non Tropicana cars in consist. These are cars in Tropicana service, filling a temporary shortage of their own equipment.

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Posted by CHIPSTRAINS on Tuesday, April 30, 2013 7:51 AM

What are the two "square boxes" on the lead engine ? ? ? Are they some new form of "ditch lights"?

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Posted by Mario_v on Tuesday, April 30, 2013 12:13 PM

CHIPSTRAINS

What are the two "square boxes" on the lead engine ? ? ? Are they some new form of "ditch lights"?

They seem to be housings for the cameras that were used in this commercial 

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, April 30, 2013 12:30 PM

And I have to wonder whether, given the spacing and location, they were synchronized to allow 3D... wouldn't THAT be fun to watch...

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Posted by terryb on Sunday, May 19, 2013 8:31 AM

Are there certain times, say peak harvest season, when the number of cars are more than 45 or does it stay about that length most of the time?

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Posted by Firelock76 on Sunday, May 19, 2013 10:57 AM

From what I've seen, and mind you I don't see it all the time, the number of Tropicana cars seems pretty consistant, up to but never more than 45 cars max.

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Posted by narig01 on Monday, May 20, 2013 5:45 AM

Neat video.

Just a comment on timing. 48 hours is very truck competitive. For a solo driver this would usually be sked'd for a 3 day run(500 miles a day , 1162 road miles)

     Most of what tropicana is looking for is consistancy. ie It gets there on a reliable schedule. So it can be 2 or 3 days in transit. Juice is not real time sensitive like lettuce or strawberries, and has a shelf life(if kept refrigerated) measured in weeks not days.

Thx IGN

Lab
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Posted by Lab on Thursday, June 6, 2013 11:24 AM

terryb

Are there certain times, say peak harvest season, when the number of cars are more than 45 or does it stay about that length most of the time?

Don't have any information about this train, but it would seem the length would be based on demand, rather than supply.

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