Western narrow gauge steam locomotive wins Trains' 2018 Preservation Award

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Western narrow gauge steam locomotive wins Trains' 2018 Preservation Award
Posted by Brian Schmidt on Monday, November 12, 2018 8:59 AM

Grant for $10,000 will complete restoration work on an 1883-built Denver & Rio Grande locomotive

http://trn.trains.com/news/news-wire/2018/11/10-trains-preservation-award-2018

Brian Schmidt, Associate Editor Trains Magazine

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Posted by Euclid on Saturday, November 17, 2018 4:11 PM

Why is this locomtive being restored to its 1915 appearance rather than its appearance as built in 1883?

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Posted by MidlandMike on Saturday, November 17, 2018 9:24 PM

The 1915 rebuilding was probably its last, so the present efforts could reuse most of what is on the loco, which would be more authentic that reproducing old hardware.

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Posted by Euclid on Sunday, November 18, 2018 10:36 AM

MidlandMike

The 1915 rebuilding was probably its last, so the present efforts could reuse most of what is on the loco, which would be more authentic that reproducing old hardware.

 

That may be the reason, but I am just wondering if that is the actual reason behind the decision.  Maybe the rebuilers prefer the 1915 appearance, for example.  I have not followed the news on this rebuild, but I would think the people invovled would have explained their decision for the appearance.  I might contact them about it.

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Posted by careerrail on Sunday, December 02, 2018 3:32 PM

Euclid

      

 
MidlandMike

The 1915 rebuilding was probably its last, so the present efforts could reuse most of what is on the loco, which would be more authentic that reproducing old hardware.

 

 

 

That may be the reason, but I am just wondering if that is the actual reason behind the decision.  Maybe the rebuilers prefer the 1915 appearance, for example.  I have not followed the news on this rebuild, but I would think the people invovled would have explained their decision for the appearance.  I might contact them about it.

 

 

Perhaps what's really important here is the locomotive is getting restored at all, becoming one more addition to the stable of operating narrow gauge steamers and a rare and early one at that.  If you haven't followed the news as you've said, you may not be aware that in the building adjacent to the shop, two wooden coaches (with one more they will bring in thereafter) are also being restored so that #168 gets to pull a period train.  These cars, with two more down at Chama nearly ready to go, include some of the very cars that the engine handled in its service years, be it 1883 or 1915.  Good for you to contact them.  We should all contact them- with donations toward this significant and expensive project that is being done so thoroughly that they plan for a service life of 45 years.

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