Tornado does the ton!

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Posted by Paul of Covington on Monday, April 24, 2017 3:23 PM

   I've been curious about the title of this thread, also mentioned in the videos.   Does "... does the ton" mean "...does 100MPH"?   I've never heard that.   Is that an English english thing?

_____________

   My mind's made up.   Don't confuse me with the facts.

RME
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Posted by RME on Monday, April 24, 2017 6:41 PM

Paul of Covington
Does "... does the ton" mean "...does 100MPH"?

Yes, explicitly, and I first saw the phrase used (in connection with automobiling) when very young.  I think the etymology derives from Cockney rhyming slang or similar.  It's one of those expressions like "wizard!" that quickly evokes that jollie olde Englande piquancy.

RME
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Posted by RME on Monday, April 24, 2017 7:00 PM

54light15
"Fun with Cyanide." Now, you're talking!

"... there's on thing that makes spring complete for me ..."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yhuMLpdnOjY

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Posted by 54light15 on Wednesday, April 26, 2017 8:59 AM

There was a group of motorcyclists many years ago in Britain that were the first to attain 100 MPH. They were know as the "Ton-up Boys." If it is rhyming slang, I'm going to have to sit on my Khyber and have a butcher's at a dictionary. I'll use my loaf for a while. Rest my plates, too. 

RME
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Posted by RME on Wednesday, April 26, 2017 9:30 AM

54light15
There was a group of motorcyclists many years ago in Britain that were the first to attain 100 MPH. They were know as the "Ton-up Boys.

Funny, this: apparently the motorcyclists were the first to use the expression "doing the ton up" (around the 1950s) whereas 'doing the ton' was an expression for automobile speed much earlier - and by extension, rail speed.

Closest I have been able to come with search is that it's a gambler's term for 100 pounds (sterling), like the American use of 'large' or 'grand' for 1000, which became a banking term in London for that number, and that its likely derivation was 100 cubic feet being a shipping 'ton'.  I couldn't find the rhyming-slang derivation I saw, but I remember it being pretty clever (as many Cockney slang derivations are!)

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Posted by gwyn68 on Wednesday, April 26, 2017 7:51 PM

Aha,as the original poster and a born cockney the rhyming slang was lost on me!!!

I was brought up in North London and the rhyming slang was a mainly East London way of speech and associated with the workers and residents of the big market areas and the docklands.

I think the slang arose from the traders and the Thames Literman and dockers as a sort of secret way of dealing with finances and goods that only they would be familier with.

Now as its 1.35 AM i am going to have a cup of char(tea)trot off up the apple and pairs (stairs) rest my nut (head) and have a kipp (sleep)!

I left school as a 14 yr old in 1960 and started on British Railways as an engine cleaner,and became a passed cleaner,eligable for fireman duties on my 16th birthday,i did manage a couple of years on steam,coal trains from Peterborough to London mainly before the smokeless zone ban in London became law and steam was banned out of the capital and a radius of about 30 miles ,

The fastest i ever travelled on a steam loco was about 55 mph,i cant imagine what a hundred must be like.

Did plenty of Ton Ups though on Deltics on the East Coast mainline from the mid 60's till the early 70's when i changed employment.

Nighty night all,sleep tight,

Don.

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