Mistreating a masterpiece?

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Mistreating a masterpiece?

  • I'm sorry to be off-topic, but I don't know who else to ask about this. 

    I just saw a trailer for next year's "The Lone Ranger" movie, and in it, there was a very beautiful 4-6-0, getting some VERY rough treatment.  How rough?  They had it flopped down on its side and sliding across some rocky-looking ground towards a collision with another piece of rolling stock, with the pistons still churning the drivers.  It hurt to watch!

      Was this an actual preservation / museum-piece locomotive, or some fresh-built fake?  If it's fake, it's a really good fake!

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  • I seriously doubt they could get someone (private owner or museum group) to allow the studio to wreck any preserved steamer. Likely this is a full scale prop augmented with a large scale model and alot of CGI. Aside from the recent use of CGI, its a long tradition in the movies to do this, not many know that the Hooterville Cannonball in the later years of Petticoat Junction was actually large scale model for the running shots and then a full size model (actually a wood/fiberglass replica of a real locomotive built for the movie Ticket to Tomahawk  and that has a amazingly interesting Hollywood career in itself) for the station scenes. The last Zorro movie did this effectively, Night at the Museum also used a large scale model to crash into Ben Stiller's foot.

    BTW I can tell you this Lone Ranger movie is NOT using the Hooterville Cannonball/Ticket to Tomahawk replica as its currently undergoing restoration in Colorado.

      Have fun with your trains

  •  

    "The last Zorro movie did this effectively"

    That last Zorro movie did indeed have me believing the equipment was  real ... until they did those aerial shots of that ridiculous track layout,  with the Popeye-cartoon arrangement of switches, and the railroad-to-nowhere non-terminal. The decorated interiors of the mostly-empty boxcars were pretty funny too. And don't get me started on the trampoline -enhanced fight stunts.

    That said, thank you, and I hope you're right, and your explanation sure does sound right.

  • Remember Hollywood built a 1" scale live steam model of 4449 for the the wreck in "Tough Guys". It looked convinsing on film like they did wreck 4449. So I suspect it is a 1" or a 11/2" Live steam model that was used.

  • It's not called Movie Magic for no reason.

    Never too old to have a happy childhood!

  • Are you trying to tell me there's NOT an island full of live dinosaurs, out in the Pacific Ocean? 

    There's no Polar Express?  And no Santa Claus too, I suppose?

    Ha! 

    Next you'll tell me Forrest Gump wasn't a documentary! 

  • Stoop Davy Dave

    Are you trying to tell me there's NOT an island full of live dinosaurs, out in the Pacific Ocean? 

    There's no Polar Express?  And no Santa Claus too, I suppose?

    Ha! 

    Next you'll tell me Forrest Gump wasn't a documentary! 

    Ummm. ...How are we going to break it to you that Star Wars wasn't a documentaryDunce

    ..or that there never was a real "three hour tour" Laugh

      Have fun with your trains

  • Well on the other hand the locomotives and rolling stock in Buster Keaton's The General and the great Burt Lancaster film The Train really were destroyed, just as you see on screen.

    Dave Nelson
  • The below paragraph is contained in the linked article: http://www.ropeofsilicon.com/depp-and-hammer-ride-in-new-pictures-from-the-lone-ranger/

    There are so many train scenes in The Lone Ranger that the filmmakers built their own period train. "It was a modern train clad in a steam engine just to get through all the work we had to do," says Verbinski. "The train sequences are really entertaining." The train robbery is an iconic Western shot. "But we turn it on its head."

    Karl Scribner

    Sunfield Twp. Michigan

    Kentucky Southern Railway

  • dknelson

    Well on the other hand the locomotives and rolling stock in Buster Keaton's The General and the great Burt Lancaster film The Train really were destroyed, just as you see on screen.

    Dave Nelson

    Well, it was a little bit of a different situation with Keatons "The General"  and Burt Lancasters "The Train".  Those locomotives and rolling stock were headed for the scrappers anyway, the filmakers gave them a chance to go out in a blaze of glory.  No problem back then, but seeing that equipment destroyed, especially the 4-4-0 in the  "General" makes my blood run cold, even if it was doomed anyway.

  • Then you would really be sad in "Rio Grande" when they took two D&RGW 2-8-0's and staged a head-on wreck with them.

  • Stoop Davy Dave

    There's no Polar Express?  

    IT DOES EXIST! AT THE STEAM RR'ING. INSTITUTE IN OWSSO, MICHIGAN! 

    The road to to success is always under construction. _____________________________________________________________________________ When the going gets tough, the tough use duct tape.

  • I've never seen mention of a live steam model used for that movie but I have seen the full size model that was built for the movie.  The model was built to scale right down to the rivet heads on the tender shell.

    As of circa 2000 it was still in protected/enclosed storage at Desert Center, Ca.  If you know where to look you can see in the windows of the building that it is still in fair shape but starting to show age and lack of attention.

  • nwo4rf

    Then you would really be sad in "Rio Grande" when they took two D&RGW 2-8-0's and staged a head-on wreck with them.

    You better believe it!

  • vsmith

    BTW I can tell you this Lone Ranger movie is NOT using the Hooterville Cannonball/Ticket to Tomahawk replica as its currently undergoing restoration in Colorado.

     
    Sierra RR No.3 isn't a replica. It was built in 1893.
    Stix