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Exhaust sparks cause fire

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Exhaust sparks cause fire
Posted by SD70Dude on Friday, July 23, 2021 1:50 AM

Nice spark show in the video, fortunately it was brought under control before any real damage was done.

https://globalnews.ca/news/8044847/tsb-grass-fires-trains-calgary-alberta-bc/

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by adkrr64 on Friday, July 23, 2021 5:01 AM

Looked like an upside-down rail grinder

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, July 23, 2021 8:47 AM

Wow!  If all diesels did that people wouldn't miss steam engines so much!  Wink

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Posted by tree68 on Friday, July 23, 2021 12:45 PM

I did that once with one of our F's.  It was a holiday train, so at night.  Apparently I put on quite the show as I approached our destination.

One would guess that it was a matter of blowing out the carbon, but when it happened, I'd already spent a fair amount of time in Notch 8.

LarryWhistling
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Posted by SD60MAC9500 on Friday, July 23, 2021 1:45 PM
 

I'm going to assume this was more than just carbon build up in the exhaust..

 
 
Rahhhhhhhhh!!!!
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Posted by Electroliner 1935 on Tuesday, July 27, 2021 12:14 AM

Back in the fifties, when I worked on the Pennsy, we could track some engines by the grass fires they caused. 

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Posted by SD70Dude on Tuesday, July 27, 2021 4:07 PM

SD60MAC9500
 

I'm going to assume this was more than just carbon build up in the exhaust..

Actually, that is probably the main reason.  This unit just had a lot more than most.  

While this amount of buildup can happen solely from long periods of idling, it can be increased by engine problems like bad injectors (too much fuel, or not atomized enough), or worn rings/pistons/liners or a blower seal issue (excessive amounts of lube oil getting burned).  

Greetings from Alberta

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Posted by tree68 on Tuesday, July 27, 2021 5:27 PM

SD70Dude
Actually, that is probably the main reason.  This unit just had a lot more than most.  

Or, it just decided to cut loose.

The incident I mentioned before was in the midst of our holiday trains - and was hardly the first time the loco had been in notch 8 in the past few weeks.

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
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There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

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Posted by mudchicken on Tuesday, July 27, 2021 6:27 PM

And how much time did that power have to just sit around and carbon-up (spent fuel solids not clearing the exhaust stack)?

Mudchicken Nothing is worth taking the risk of losing a life over. Come home tonight in the same condition that you left home this morning in. Safety begins with ME.... cinscocom-west
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Posted by tree68 on Tuesday, July 27, 2021 7:06 PM

mudchicken

And how much time did that power have to just sit around and carbon-up (spent fuel solids not clearing the exhaust stack)?

Depending on the outside temperature (December in Central NY), it might have run overnight, but the unit is equipped with the locomotive equivalent of a block heater, so odds are it ran for a couple of hours before the evening's departure.

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
My Opinion. Standard Disclaimers Apply. No Expiration Date
Come ride the rails with me!
There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

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Posted by SD70Dude on Tuesday, July 27, 2021 7:59 PM

In the case of the CN unit in Calgary, it might have spent months idling most of the time, locomotives rarely spend much time in high throttle while in yard service.  And the mandatory inspection interval is 180 days up here, not 90.

Like Larry said, the buildup may have survived previous periods of high throttle and just happened to pick this occasion to break loose. 

The location of the Calgary fire is midway between Sarcee Yard and the newer Calgary Logistics Park at Conrich, so this was most likely a yard transfer movement and the unit had probably been pulling hard for at least a mile or two before the spark show was caught on video.

Greetings from Alberta

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Posted by Shadow the Cats owner on Tuesday, July 27, 2021 9:22 PM

My hubby drove an old Detroit diesel 2 stroke or as he called it the screaming gutless weakling.  He said that thing did the same thing from time to time.  The joy of 2 stroke diesel engines.  

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