Loram operating practices

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  • Member since
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  • From: Georgia USA SW of Atlanta
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Loram operating practices
Posted by blue streak 1 on Tuesday, January 14, 2020 8:00 PM

Loram is conducting a ~ semi annual rail grinding of the CSX  A&WP sub from LaGrange Ga toward Atlanta.  Observations this night time operation had some changes have not seen before.  

1.  The grinding train was very well lit with LED spotlights on both sides shinning down on the ROW.  The spectuclar fire under the train is alway getting persons attentions.  Some traffic did stop but do not know if anyone called  911 ?    

2.  There was another 2 unit Loram train following about 1/2 mile behind .  Being dark I was unable to determine what function the 2 unit train had.  Both trains sure have a lot of headlghts forward or reverse.

3.  The main Loram train made the regular one pass over the CSX main.

4.  Surprise surprise the main train then made 4 passes back and forth on the adjaecent siding that has never had a pass before as far as I know?

5.  Main train then continued grinding on northward. 

CSX appears to be taking the new rail profiles very seriously ?

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Posted by BaltACD on Tuesday, January 14, 2020 8:58 PM

blue streak 1
Loram is conducting a ~ semi annual rail grinding of the CSX  A&WP sub from LaGrange Ga toward Atlanta.  Observations this night time operation had some changes have not seen before.  

1.  The grinding train was very well lit with LED spotlights on both sides shinning down on the ROW.  The spectuclar fire under the train is alway getting persons attentions.  Some traffic did stop but do not know if anyone called  911 ?    

2.  There was another 2 unit Loram train following about 1/2 mile behind .  Being dark I was unable to determine what function the 2 unit train had.  Both trains sure have a lot of headlghts forward or reverse.

3.  The main Loram train made the regular one pass over the CSX main.

4.  Surprise surprise the main train then made 4 passes back and forth on the adjaecent siding that has never had a pass before as far as I know?

5.  Main train then continued grinding on northward. 

CSX appears to be taking the new rail profiles very seriously ?

I believe rail grinding has become specialized to the extent that main running tracks and switches require different grinding techniques.  I suspect the 2nd train would be the switch grinder.

My understanding when I was working was the the Engineering Department scheduled rail grinding on the basis of tonnage handled on the various track.  These tonnage calculations are also one of the factors used in determining rail replacement schedules.  I am surprised it has taken this long for they to realize that sidings get worn rail profiles too.

  • Member since
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  • From: Georgia USA SW of Atlanta
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Posted by blue streak 1 on Tuesday, January 14, 2020 11:27 PM

Balt.  Now wish I had followed the first train through the switch.  It did back onto the siding for the first of 4 passes all way to end of siding but rain was so hard that did not think it was necessary.  Thinking never does work great.  First train may have ground the stock rails only ?  Sure wish I had waited around to see if 2nd train did the switch points ?  Any way hard rain did not dampen the fire under the first train. 

Have to wonder if this was the first time grinding the siding?

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Posted by BaltACD on Wednesday, January 15, 2020 7:10 AM

blue streak 1
Have to wonder if this was the first time grinding the siding?

With the number of passes - I would believe it was the first time for the siding to be ground.  For all I know, the siding may have had used rail from another location and was in need of 'correction' from that prior use.  Sidings generally are not laid with new rail, they get used rail from another location most of the time.

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Posted by mudchicken on Wednesday, January 15, 2020 9:00 AM

All railroads take rail grinding seriously. Some have more re$ource$ than others to extend the life of their rail. (so they can waste money on other shiny things)

Big train is a 120 stone rail grinder. Smaller 2-unit train is a 28-stone switch and crossing grinder. The separate corrugation analyzer determines the number of passes and the readout determines priority. Big train is not as nimble or adjustable as the smaller grinder.

Please stay away from the grinder as far as possible. Even with the screen racks/ shields, a broken stone can still fly like a missle. And then there are the "Speno droppings" (grinder rail & stone fines)- NO TOUCHEE! (unless you're into second and third degree burns) ... Probably have a hi-rail water truck patrolling behind looking for smoke or open flame.

Mudchicken Nothing is worth taking the risk of losing a life over. Come home tonight in the same condition that you left home this morning in. Safety begins with ME.... cinscocom-west
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Posted by tree68 on Wednesday, January 15, 2020 12:39 PM

mudchicken
Probably have a hi-rail water truck patrolling behind looking for smoke or open flame.

Not to mention the fellow(s) standing on the back with the deluge gun(s).

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
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There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, January 15, 2020 12:54 PM

tree68
Not to mention the fellow(s) standing on the back with the deluge gun(s).

Every time I've seen a rail-grinding train, the 'protection' against fires has been with the two guns tree mentions, on the caboose-like trailing vehicle.  The nozzles on these have been carefully made to project a 'coherent' jet of water, that travels long distances with very tight convergence, like the old Green Avenger water pistol produced.  The crews can swing and elevate these drench guns very accurately to tag anything they think is of interest, up to considerable range from the rear platform.  I don't recall having seen any kind of rail vehicle following the train at distance, night or day -- presumably there is something like a hy-rail pickup or perhaps a Brandt on call with adequate extinguishing capacity if something unusual escapes the gunners.

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