Trains to Ships

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Trains to Ships
Posted by BaltACD on Saturday, November 2, 2019 12:11 PM

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Posted by Jeff Lewis on Saturday, November 2, 2019 10:30 PM

I love bucket wheel machines. They are the most awesome behemouths. 

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Posted by BaltACD on Sunday, November 3, 2019 9:20 AM

I found it interesting that the conveyor systems that the bucket wheels use to dig the coal piles are also used in reverse to create the coal pile from the dumped railcars.

The scene of a car being turned over and dumped is the first time I have seen the dumping of cars with rotary dump couplings done.  I have always known the theory - but this is the first time I have seen it on video.

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Posted by SD60MAC9500 on Sunday, November 3, 2019 1:04 PM
 

Here's a look at TORCO operation in Toledo, OH

 
 
Rahhhhhhhhh!!!!
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Posted by BaltACD on Sunday, November 3, 2019 4:11 PM

SD60MAC9500
 

Here's a look at TORCO operation in Toledo, OH

One thing rotary dumpers find with unwavering regularity - knuckle pins that have not been cotter keyed in place.

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Posted by Leo_Ames on Sunday, November 3, 2019 6:16 PM

Nice video.

Hard to believe that all three ships in it are now gone. 

Edit: I take it back. The Canadian Enterprise is still kicking as the Algoma Enterprise, but probably not for much longer.

Her last five year survey was the winter of 2014/2015. Assuming they apply for a 1 year extension that's usually granted, the 2020 season will almost assuredly be her last with a self-unloader from Coatia (The Algoma Intepid) that should be ready in time for the 2021 season to take her place.

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Posted by SD60MAC9500 on Sunday, November 3, 2019 10:11 PM
 

BaltACD

 

 
 
 

 

 

 

One thing rotary dumpers find with unwavering regularity - knuckle pins that have not been cotter keyed in place.

 

I noticed this years ago heading into CUS. We got held for a BNSF MTY Coal. As it passed us I noticed about 30 or so knuckle pins sticking out about 8-10".

 

Leo_Ames

Hard to believe that all three ships in it are now gone. 

Edit: I take it back. The Canadian Enterprise is still kicking as the Algoma Enterprise, but probably not for much longer.

Her last five year survey was the winter of 2014/2015. Assuming they apply for a 1 year extension that's usually granted, the 2020 season will almost assuredly be her last with a self-unloader from Coatia (The Algoma Intepid) that should be ready in time for the 2021 season to take her place.

 

 

 

Algoma's Fleet is undergoing a renewal. If I remember correctly they have a new vessel or two coming for the next 6 years.

 
 
 
 
 
Rahhhhhhhhh!!!!
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Posted by Leo_Ames on Monday, November 4, 2019 9:04 PM

Fleet renewal is starting to come to an end. Almost all of the pre 2010 fleet from Algoma Central (And Upper Lakes Shipping which they absorbed a decade or so ago) have been replaced since 2008. Very little is left of their vessels built in the 1960's-1980's to still replace.

Just the old Algoma Enterprise (Likely 1 season left), Algoma Transport (4 seasons left on what likely was her last 5 year survey), John D. Leitch (Lower midbody replaced 2001/2002; Should be safe until at least ~2030), and Tim S. Dool are left from the old guard (Most of her forebody like the ballast tanks was replaced in 1996 and she was repowered in 2007; Should be safe until at least the mid 2020's). 

They also have a contract for another straight decker, so it appears they're about to start retiring the three former Viken Shipping bulk carriers they bought back in 2008 and brought into the lakes for the grain trade (Unless this is for fleet expansion rather than renewal).

 

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Posted by SD70Dude on Monday, November 4, 2019 9:25 PM

SD60MAC9500
 
BaltACD

One thing rotary dumpers find with unwavering regularity - knuckle pins that have not been cotter keyed in place.

I noticed this years ago heading into CUS. We got held for a BNSF MTY Coal. As it passed us I noticed about 30 or so knuckle pins sticking out about 8-10".

As long as the knuckle is closed you don't actually need the swivel pin.

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Tuesday, November 5, 2019 6:55 AM

As opposed to rotary dumpers, are there any car shakers still in service?  Rail-To-Water Transfer used car shakers, but I believe that facility is long gone.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by tree68 on Tuesday, November 5, 2019 11:11 AM

CSSHEGEWISCH

As opposed to rotary dumpers, are there any car shakers still in service?  Rail-To-Water Transfer used car shakers, but I believe that facility is long gone.

They haven't burned coal or petcoke at the facility for nearly ten years, but when they did, the cogen near me did use a shaker.  You could feel it in nearby buildings.  I never actually saw it, though, as they dumped inside a building.

The facility was changed over to burn biomass (woodchips), which arrive via trucks. 

 

LarryWhistling
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EKR
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Posted by EKR on Tuesday, November 5, 2019 12:29 PM

SD70Dude

 

 
SD60MAC9500
 
BaltACD

One thing rotary dumpers find with unwavering regularity - knuckle pins that have not been cotter keyed in place.

I noticed this years ago heading into CUS. We got held for a BNSF MTY Coal. As it passed us I noticed about 30 or so knuckle pins sticking out about 8-10".

 

 

As long as the knuckle is closed you don't actually need the swivel pin.

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Usually both knuckles are opened on the exit end of a rotary dump. So the knuckle needs the pin and cotter key checked on the entrance end before rolling the car over.          

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Posted by SD60MAC9500 on Tuesday, November 5, 2019 7:32 PM

Leo_Ames

Fleet renewal is starting to come to an end. Almost all of the pre 2010 fleet from Algoma Central (And Upper Lakes Shipping which they absorbed a decade or so ago) have been replaced since 2008. Very little is left of their vessels built in the 1960's-1980's to still replace.

Just the old Algoma Enterprise (Likely 1 season left), Algoma Transport (4 seasons left on what likely was her last 5 year survey), John D. Leitch (Lower midbody replaced 2001/2002; Should be safe until at least ~2030), and Tim S. Dool are left from the old guard (Most of her forebody like the ballast tanks was replaced in 1996 and she was repowered in 2007; Should be safe until at least the mid 2020's). 

They also have a contract for another straight decker, so it appears they're about to start retiring the three former Viken Shipping bulk carriers they bought back in 2008 and brought into the lakes for the grain trade (Unless this is for fleet expansion rather than renewal).

 

 

Yeah the Algoma Enterprise is looking wore out. Haven't caught it yet this year.. I see Interlake will be getting a new vessel in a few years. This is great news!

Rahhhhhhhhh!!!!
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Posted by tree68 on Tuesday, November 5, 2019 9:15 PM

We would be perhaps remiss if we didn't mention the opposite operation - unloading the ships.  What more graceful and grand method for unloading than the the magnificent Hulett Unloaders?  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fGO8GGozTe0

I find the view from the operator's cab particularly interesting.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RJfnk2S330

Today, of course, the self-unloader handles the task.

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
My Opinion. Standard Disclaimers Apply. No Expiration Date
Come ride the rails with me!
There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

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