Odd video of CN locomotive running over trees

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Odd video of CN locomotive running over trees
Posted by longhorn1969 on Thursday, May 17, 2018 8:43 AM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u7QCnv0Qpfg

Entertaining to watch and definately a "physics" lesson, but isnt' there some possibility of damage to the traction motors?

Do you think the plow or front guardrail would be damaged too?

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Posted by BaltACD on Thursday, May 17, 2018 9:08 AM

Yes there is the potential for traction motor damgae - there is also the potential for traction motor damage at poorly maintained highway crossings.

Traction motors are constructed to be rather robust pieces of machienry and have been designed  to 'shrug off' minor impacts such as the trees that were run over would present.  The bigger potential in running over the trees is for them to become entangled and break a air hose coupling somewhere back in the train.

The pilot structures of diesel locomotives are also robust and are designed for for such impacts and in many cases will shove the impacted trees out of the gauge of the track.

         

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Posted by Firelock76 on Thursday, May 17, 2018 8:50 PM

There you go!  Show those trees who's boss!

Seriously though, it seems to me that by the time the crew sees them it's too late to try and stop anyway.  Might as well keep on goin'.

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Posted by SD70Dude on Friday, May 18, 2018 4:07 AM

The locomotive appears to be a ES44DC, and most of CN's have the angle cock behind the steps and underneath the cab, away from the impact zone.  

834 is grain empties, and normally has more than one unit.  Even if the lead unit were to lose power due to traction motor damage there would most likely still be enough power available to get the train over the road.  

Agree about the tendency for the plow/pilot to break up trees into little pieces (steel beats wood), but my main concern in this sort of situation would be if a larger tree were to directly impact the windshield and shatter it.  

This sort of situation is a common occurrence in the Pacific Northwest, with heavy, wet snow weighing down trees.  Nothing new, just caught on tape this time.

This footage is from the area between Blue River and Valemount, B.C.  I have worked that line and know the crew from this train.  As you can see they are fun people with a great sense of humour.

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Posted by zardoz on Friday, May 18, 2018 9:44 PM

Sure is nice and quiet in the cab (except for the thumps).

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Posted by Paul_D_North_Jr on Saturday, May 19, 2018 11:37 AM

I'd be more worried about the cab windows breaking from the impacts with some of those branches.  Sure, they're safety glazed and all that, but they'll still shatter if hit hard enough.

Thanks for posting that video - a definite 'cab ride' feel, nice scenery, and yes, it was entertaining! 

- PDN. 

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Posted by longhorn1969 on Monday, May 21, 2018 2:50 PM

SD70Dude

The locomotive appears to be a ES44DC, and most of CN's have the angle cock behind the steps and underneath the cab, away from the impact zone.  

834 is grain empties, and normally has more than one unit.  Even if the lead unit were to lose power due to traction motor damage there would most likely still be enough power available to get the train over the road.  

Agree about the tendency for the plow/pilot to break up trees into little pieces (steel beats wood), but my main concern in this sort of situation would be if a larger tree were to directly impact the windshield and shatter it.  

This sort of situation is a common occurrence in the Pacific Northwest, with heavy, wet snow weighing down trees.  Nothing new, just caught on tape this time.

This footage is from the area between Blue River and Valemount, B.C.  I have worked that line and know the crew from this train.  As you can see they are fun people with a great sense of humour.

 

 

So no damage to the pilot or front steps? There an excellent physics lesson somewhere in this.

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Posted by tree68 on Monday, May 21, 2018 6:16 PM

longhorn1969
So no damage to the pilot or front steps?

It appeared most of the branches they were hitting were upper branches.  If they caught a full trunk, something would bend...

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Posted by mudchicken on Monday, May 21, 2018 7:13 PM

Paul_D_North_Jr

I'd be more worried about the cab windows breaking from the impacts with some of those branches.  Sure, they're safety glazed and all that, but they'll still shatter if hit hard enough.

Thanks for posting that video - a definite 'cab ride' feel, nice scenery, and yes, it was entertaining! 

- PDN. 

 

Roundhouse foreman out there somewhere trying to figure out how all the handrails and stansions (sp?) got all bent up.Blindfold

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Posted by SD70Dude on Tuesday, May 22, 2018 5:22 AM

If you guys think trees are bad, you should see what locomotives can end up looking like after a trip through the same area during mudslide season.

Busted headlights, handrails bent off, dirt and rocks piled all over the front steps and on top of the fuel tank.

So long as the air doesn't go, it's safe to move to the next repair location.

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Posted by longhorn1969 on Wednesday, May 23, 2018 10:27 AM

SD70Dude

If you guys think trees are bad, you should see what locomotives can end up looking like after a trip through the same area during mudslide season.

Busted headlights, handrails bent off, dirt and rocks piled all over the front steps and on top of the fuel tank.

So long as the air doesn't go, it's safe to move to the next repair location.

 

 

Woudn't be more hazardous than hitting trees? Mudslides CAN cause derailments. Or do they plow through that too?

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Posted by Electroliner 1935 on Wednesday, May 23, 2018 10:43 PM

My experience of being on a trip that hit a car might be of interest. Back in the late '50's, I was on a PRR train that hit an automobile while en-route to Richmond IN. We were north of Hamilton OH. doing about 65 mph.  After we stopped, I got off the coach and walk to the front. The pilot of the E-8 had been bent down to within an quarter of an inch of the rail head. Someone decided that if the loco bounced, it might catch on the rail and that wouldn't do. So we waited until a welder arrived. I watched this man sit on a rail seat and make pass after pass with his cutting torch eating that thick steel. Took over 40 minutes to get his cut made. Some broom handle took care of the front MU pipes that had been sheared off. Fortunately, the train caught the auto just in front of its front tire and threw the car into the field and the two teens survived. But the thing that impressed me the most was what it took to cut that pilot. Tough steel. 

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Posted by SD70Dude on Wednesday, May 23, 2018 10:49 PM

longhorn1969
SD70Dude

If you guys think trees are bad, you should see what locomotives can end up looking like after a trip through the same area during mudslide season.

Busted headlights, handrails bent off, dirt and rocks piled all over the front steps and on top of the fuel tank.

So long as the air doesn't go, it's safe to move to the next repair location.

Woudn't be more hazardous than hitting trees? Mudslides CAN cause derailments. Or do they plow through that too?

Yes, derailments happen.  But in many cases by the time you see the slide it is too late to stop, so you are going through it no matter what.  If you stay on the track then the train continues on, and the event is reported to the Dispatcher.

Smaller slides can land on the track and not damage it, and also may not trip the slide detector fence, even if there is one at that spot.

Greetings from Alberta

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Posted by mudchicken on Thursday, May 24, 2018 12:21 PM

Usually, a contributing factor like debris piling up at a crossing or switch contributes to the fun and puts the wheel on the ground. Out here, in the fall, deep cuts full of tumbleweeds and russian thistle make life interesting - especially in hi-rails.

Mudchicken Nothing is worth taking the risk of losing a life over. Come home tonight in the same condition that you left home this morning in. Safety begins with ME.... cinscocom-west

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