Trackside with Trains Vol. 312: "Tricky trackwork" is open for submissions

501 views
3 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
Moderator
  • Member since
    January, 2011
  • From: Wisconsin
  • 630 posts
Trackside with Trains Vol. 312: "Tricky trackwork" is open for submissions
Posted by Brian Schmidt on Tuesday, September 05, 2017 10:42 AM

Congratulations to Crandell Overton for his winning photo in Trackside with Trains Vol. 311!

The theme for Vol. 312 is "tricky trackwork." Due to the shortened holiday week, please submit your images by 12 p.m. Central Daylight Time Thursday, Sept. 14, 2017, to trackside@trains.com. Only one submission should be sent per photographer. For full guidelines, go to trn.trains.com/photos-videos/trackside.

Brian Schmidt, Associate Editor Trains Magazine

  • Member since
    February, 2007
  • From: Utah
  • 55 posts
Posted by Steam1800's on Monday, September 11, 2017 4:25 PM

The Lake Ponchartrain bridge photo by Nathan K. Burris at 5.8 miles long was not always the longest bridge in the U.S.  The Lucin cutoff 12 mile wooden rail trestle crossing the Great Salt Lake was the longest until 1959 when it was demolished.

Allen
  • Member since
    November, 2013
  • 1 posts
Posted by JOHN WAGNER1 on Monday, September 11, 2017 4:46 PM

Steam1800's

The Lake Ponchartrain bridge photo by Nathan K. Burris at 5.8 miles long was not always the longest bridge in the U.S.  The Lucin cutoff 12 mile wooden rail trestle crossing the Great Salt Lake was the longest until 1959 when it was demolished.

 

  • Member since
    July, 2010
  • From: Louisiana
  • 1,399 posts
Posted by Paul of Covington on Tuesday, September 12, 2017 2:13 PM

Steam1800's

The Lake Ponchartrain bridge photo by Nathan K. Burris at 5.8 miles long was not always the longest bridge in the U.S.  The Lucin cutoff 12 mile wooden rail trestle crossing the Great Salt Lake was the longest until 1959 when it was demolished.

    I'll see you and raise you one.   The original Lake Pontchartrain trestle as completed in 1883 was 21 miles long.   The ends over low marshes were filled in by 1896.  Down here it's hard to tell sometimes where land ends and water begins.

_____________

   My mind's made up.   Don't confuse me with the facts.

Join our Community!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

Newsletter Sign-Up

By signing up you may also receive occasional reader surveys and special offers from Trains magazine.Please view our privacy policy

Search the Community