historic warbirds

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historic warbirds
Posted by 54light15 on Wednesday, September 02, 2015 4:19 PM

You know what else is impressive? The Canadian Warbirds Museums Avro Lancaster that just now flew over my house. 4 Packard-built Merlins makes for some mighty fine music!

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Posted by groomer man on Sunday, September 06, 2015 1:53 PM
I agree 54light15 anytime I can make it to hear a P-51fly over my head I do it . Kind of like when a heavy freight with multiple units gets really pulling
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Posted by switch7frg on Tuesday, September 08, 2015 10:48 AM

Wink 54light15, those Rolls- Merlin  engines  in the Mustang sure do whistle a pretty tune. Once you hear the tune it is never forgotten. 

                                              Cannonball

Y6bs evergreen in my mind

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Posted by tatans on Tuesday, September 08, 2015 3:04 PM

I remember back in the 50's on the prairies as a kid, watching 21 Lancasters fly over us at 1000 feet all within visual contact to each other, they were heading to Alberta to be scrapped, a few were saved one is still in Claresholm, Alberta. That is a sound that can never be forgotten, the ground was shaking.

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Posted by Norm48327 on Tuesday, September 08, 2015 3:19 PM

And this thread is railroad related? Question Question Question Question Question

Norm


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Posted by jeffhergert on Tuesday, September 08, 2015 4:51 PM

A few weekends back, while waiting for a signal at E. Missouri Valley, a B-17 flew over us.  It appeared to be heading for the Omaha airport.  I was hoping it might circle around so I could get another look, but no such luck.

Jeff 

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Posted by Firelock76 on Tuesday, September 08, 2015 5:20 PM

Ever hear a rotary-engine powered world War One fighter?  It's been years, but I rmember seeing several at the Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome in Rhinebeck, NY.  A Fokker Triplane, a Sopwith Camel and Pup, and an AVRO 504K.  Sounds like nothing you've ever heard before, like a beserk cross between a power mower and a chainsaw. 

You know, when I was a boy at the time of the 50th Anniversary years of World War One, the men that flew them were my heroes.  Nothing I've seen or read since that time has caused me to change my opinion.

What's this got to do with trains?  Welllll, the Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome DID have a Baldwin Trench Locomotive on static display at the time!

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Posted by switch7frg on Tuesday, September 08, 2015 5:36 PM

SmileYes, it is still a trains thread. If it wasn't for trains North American Aviation in Columbus Ohio would be hard pressed for parts to build their  planes. 

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Posted by ouibejamn on Tuesday, September 08, 2015 7:12 PM

Norm48327
And this thread is railroad related?

Originally this thread was going to be titled "Let's piss off the old man", but cooler heads prevailed.

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Posted by BaltACD on Tuesday, September 08, 2015 10:21 PM

In a crossover move; Rail Exec. picked to head United Airlines

Oscar Munoz, chief operations officer and president of CSX Corp. (NYSE: CSX) has been tapped as the new chief executive officer for United Airlines (NYSE: UAL).

         

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Posted by Murphy Siding on Tuesday, September 08, 2015 10:34 PM

54light15

You know what else is impressive? The Canadian Warbirds Museums Avro Lancaster that just now flew over my house. 4 Packard-built Merlins makes for some mighty fine music!

 

 Was it in a heritage paint scheme? Stick out tongue... like the railroads do? (note the railroad tie-in for the purists.Wink)

      We're pretty lucky here. Over the years we've had a B-17, a B-24, and a B-29 'Fifi' stop here a couple times for open house type events.  My company's owner was a major sponsor at an air show here.  Part of the deal was a ride in a B-25.  All of us that wanted to put our name in a hat and our bookkeeper got the thrill of a lifetime.  No Lancs yet.

Thanks to Chris / CopCarSS for my avatar.

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Posted by Norm48327 on Wednesday, September 09, 2015 7:55 AM

ouibejamn
Originally this thread was going to be titled "Let's piss off the old man", but cooler heads prevailed.

Typical reply from an immature twelve year old.

Norm


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Posted by M636C on Wednesday, September 09, 2015 8:26 AM

Forty three years ago I was still in bed on a Sunday morning when a Catalina flew over. The sound of the twin radial engines was distinctive and I saw it fly over without leaving my bed.

I was dressed in record time and made it to the local airport before it had taxied in and shut down.

It was being used for mineral exploration.

I was working as a railway mechanical engineer at the time.....

M636C

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Posted by Paul of Covington on Wednesday, September 09, 2015 12:07 PM

Norm48327

And this thread is railroad related? Question Question Question Question Question

   As I recall, several past threads have evolved into spirited discussions on warplanes or ships.    I figured that 54 just decided to take a shortcut.

_____________

   "A stranger is just a friend you ain't met yet."  ___ Dave Gardner

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Posted by Murphy Siding on Wednesday, September 09, 2015 2:07 PM

M636C

Forty three years ago I was still in bed on a Sunday morning when a Catalina flew over. The sound of the twin radial engines was distinctive and I saw it fly over without leaving my bed.

I was dressed in record time and made it to the local airport before it had taxied in and shut down.

It was being used for mineral exploration.

I was working as a railway mechanical engineer at the time.....

M636C

 

  When I was in high school, a B-17 flew over my house.  I called the airport and they put me through to the airport manager.  We had a really good talk about the B-17-it was being used as an aerial tanker- and about old warbirds in general.  A couple years later our paths crossed again when he interviewed me for a summertime job when I was in college. He remembered me and I got the job. 

Thanks to Chris / CopCarSS for my avatar.

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Posted by tree68 on Wednesday, September 09, 2015 2:52 PM

To digress occasionally is not a bad thing.  I'm not sure it's accurate, but I've heard that there's more to life than trains....

Heard some radials nearby one day and got outside in time to see a PBY that had apparently landed or done a touch-and-go on a small lake nearby.  It was flying out the the local airport for a while.

One neat thing about going to air shows is seeing (and hearing) those old warbirds flying.  

Had a chance to take a self-guided tour of a B-17 at an air show a few years ago (the show wasn't open yet and I was there as staff).  For as big as they look on the silver screen, they were tiny.  I had a heck of a time getting my 6'5" frame into the nose.  The tail gunner's position and the ball turret were out of the question...

 

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Posted by tomikawaTT on Wednesday, September 09, 2015 3:45 PM

Watching them and hearing them is one thing.  Actually working on them was another, quite different.  Try changing #13 cylinder on the #1 R-1830 of a C-47 in a Korean snowstorm if you want to find a whole new definition of fun...

Over my 26 year career I got hands in the machinery experience with a lot of airframes, most of them powered by reciprocating engines.  Later, I was in the business of readying a base for the first F-15s to be deployed outside CONUS.  The first one arrived and I went over to the nose dock to look at it - drip pan under the open engine bay access, telltale seeps at rivets and one landing gear actuator showing a telltale moist smear.

I went back to the office and the project officer (a supply type who thought the F-15 was the greatest thing since the steam engine) asked, "Well, Sarge, whaddya think?"

My answer?  "A flying fuel, oil and hydraulic leak, just like all the other aircraft I've worked on."

Much later, I was a statistician in a Titan outfit that had somehow acquired a B-17 as a non-flying squadron mascot.  I was asked why I didn't volunteer to work on restoring the old hulk, since I had experience with similar aircraft.  Answer - "It's one thing to get filthy working on a plane that will be flying missions and accruing hours.  Working on something that will never move again except at the end of a towbar isn't worth my time.  I have a model railroad that satisfies my need for a hobby."

That Titan outfit stood down not long after I retired.  The B-17 is under cover at the Pima Air Museum.  The latest iteration of the model railroad is going strong.

Chuck, MSgt(ret) USAF

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Posted by schlimm on Wednesday, September 09, 2015 4:14 PM

Entering service in 1976, F-15s will remain in production through 2019 (for foreign nations). The USAF still has 178 F-15C/Ds and 224 "Deep Strike" F-15Es in service.

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Posted by BOB WITHORN on Wednesday, September 09, 2015 4:58 PM

Does flying over railroads qualify?  

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Posted by ROBERT WILLISON on Wednesday, September 09, 2015 5:11 PM

Maybe not a war bird, but how  i liked to fly in or watch an island airways ford tri motor rumble her way west to put n bay. Quite a sight and experience to have and remember.

 

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Posted by Firelock76 on Wednesday, September 09, 2015 5:30 PM

Years back I read a wonderful story about that Island Airways Ford Tri-Motor. 

A little boy was going for a ride on the plane with his father, and as the engines fired up the boy's face lit up like his dad had never seen before.

You see, the boy was deaf, and the noise of the engines was the first thing he'd ever heard.  Yep, apparantly they were THAT loud!

Anyone know if that "Tin Goose" is still around?

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Posted by Wizlish on Wednesday, September 09, 2015 9:23 PM

tomikawaTT
Watching them and hearing them is one thing. Actually working on them was another, quite different. Try changing #13 cylinder on the #1 R-1830 of a C-47 in a Korean snowstorm if you want to find a whole new definition of fun...

For those who want the flavor of the experience, here is a guide for you.

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Posted by Dr D on Wednesday, September 09, 2015 10:01 PM

My favorite B-17 memory came upon me by surprise -

I was traveling with my folks on summer vacation touring the northwestern United States.  Mom, Dad and I were catching some of the great American railroads, Great Northern, and Northern Pacific.

In Montana near Little Big Horn River in 1967 there was a large forest fire sparked by a thunderstorm lightening strike.  The event of course made newspapers and could be seen by the smoke plume in the distance as we traveled.  

Unexpectedly, as we passed some local airport - I was privileged to suddenly see going down the road right along side of us - a silver plane taking off down a runway, banking and climbing - almost over the road we traveled - four engines - silver spinning props just a hundred yards or so away from dad's speeding 1966 Chrysler New Yorker.  

I was caught aback, there were no gun turrets like the model planes I built - and I suddenly realized this was a B-17 bomber - a real B-17 bomber!

Struck by the moment I was surprised how much smaller it was than I had envisioned - and so much more agile - and fast - and it soared with a grace un-equaled.  Wow! and in civilian service!

Since that time I have recollected my prividged moment as -

A B-17 in service contemporary to the lives of the men who flew them in combat!

A B-17 fighting forest fires - in a useful commercial service not a historic one!

A B-17 famous - but in peacetime an acronym of pain for what men everywhere were trying to forget!

A B-17 never to be forgotten - flown seriously as a modern plane with mission - by those who knew exactly how to fly them!

Doc 

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Posted by schlimm on Wednesday, September 09, 2015 10:25 PM

Two of them at Port Clinton and one still flies, but not regularly.

http://www.cleveland.com/travel/index.ssf/2014/07/port_clintons_liberty_aviation.html

 

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Posted by BOB WITHORN on Thursday, September 10, 2015 6:26 AM
Mr. Willison, In the early 60's my uncle "kidknaped" my brother and I, without telling anyone what he was doing, and took us "on a trip". First stop was Selfridge airfield to see the Thunderbirds. He then decided a trip to Ohio was necessary to ride the Ford Tri-motors before going on to the AF museum in Dayton, I was maybe 10 or 11. Still is at the top of my fun list
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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Thursday, September 10, 2015 7:39 AM

As the son of a navigator who served with the 306th Bomb Group, I am grateful to see the favorable words for the B-17.  But Dad would also remind us that war is hell, even at 30,000 feet.  Also remember that they flew in an unpressurized, poorly heated and cramped aircraft.  Crew members wore oxygen masks to stay alive and wore heated flying suits (think form-fitting electric blanket) to keep from freezing, not always successfully.  Then they had to deal with a bunch of other guys at the same altitude who were trying to kill them.

We should appreciate and honor what Dad and his fellow crewmen did but we should not glorify it.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by erikem on Thursday, September 10, 2015 8:52 AM

Dr D

In Montana near Little Big Horn River in 1967 there was a large forest fire sparked by a thunderstorm lightening strike.  The event of course made newspapers and could be seen by the smoke plume in the distance as we traveled.  

Unexpectedly, as we passed some local airport - I was privileged to suddenly see going down the road right along side of us - a silver plane taking off down a runway, banking and climbing - almost over the road we traveled - four engines - silver spinning props just a hundred yards or so away from dad's speeding 1966 Chrysler New Yorker.  

I'll bet you were by the Forsythe airport, which is the only one next to the main highway in that part of Montana. The Hardin airport is close to the old highway, but it is right next to downtown Hardin and not a place for your dad to be speeding.

 - Erik

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Posted by Firelock76 on Thursday, September 10, 2015 6:23 PM

schlimm

Two of them at Port Clinton and one still flies, but not regularly.

http://www.cleveland.com/travel/index.ssf/2014/07/port_clintons_liberty_aviation.html

 

Thank you Schlimm, I appreciate the link!

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Posted by BOB WITHORN on Friday, September 11, 2015 6:29 AM

I'm the son of a bombardier, B24's, who was with the 380th B/G (H), hence the picture I use. My dad was very much the same. Was reading the letters he sent home to is girl friend, (my mother), and in one he wrote, on his way back from bombing Saigon, "Sorry to be using pencil to write this but my ink pen does not work where we are at as it is WELL below zero".

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Posted by dehusman on Friday, September 11, 2015 10:44 AM

To tie it back into railroads.  There was a combination air-rail coast to coast service offered in the 20's and 30's where the railroads advanced the passengers at night and then they swapped over to planes during the day.  I believe Ford Tri-motors were used in that service.

Dave H. Painted side goes up.

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