On This Day in Railroad History

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On This Day in Railroad History
Posted by cherokee woman on Thursday, May 10, 2012 7:15 AM

May 10th:

In 1869, the golden spike was driven at Promontory, Utah, joining the Union Pacific and the Central Pacific lines to form America's first transcontinental railway.

Angel cherokee woman "O'Toole's law: Murphy was an optimist."
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Posted by Espins1 on Thursday, May 10, 2012 7:28 PM

What an amazing accomplishment it was! Smile

Scott Espin
Railfan - Reno NV

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Posted by cherokee woman on Tuesday, May 15, 2012 4:23 PM

From WHAS.11.COM's TODAY IN HISTORY:

May 15, 2001


A runaway freight train rolled about 70 miles through Ohio with no one on board, before a railroad employee jumped onto the locomotive and brought it to a stop.

Angel cherokee woman "O'Toole's law: Murphy was an optimist."
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Posted by cherokee woman on Wednesday, May 16, 2012 6:32 AM

From Arcamax History & Quotes for May 16th:

In 1995, the leader of a Japanese religious cult was charged with murder and attempted murder in the March nerve-gas attacks in a Tokyo subway that killed 12 people and injured more than 5,000.

Angel cherokee woman "O'Toole's law: Murphy was an optimist."
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Posted by cherokee woman on Tuesday, May 22, 2012 6:36 PM

From Arcamax History & Quotes for May 22:

In 1868, seven members of the Reno gang stole $98,000 from a railway car at Marshfield, Ind. It was the original Great Train Robbery.

Angel cherokee woman "O'Toole's law: Murphy was an optimist."
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Posted by cherokee woman on Tuesday, June 26, 2012 2:49 PM

For June 26th:

1894The American Railway Union, led by Eugene Debs, called a general strike in sympathy with Pullman workers.

Angel cherokee woman "O'Toole's law: Murphy was an optimist."
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Posted by cherokee woman on Wednesday, July 11, 2012 7:22 AM

For July 11th:

Also in 2011, more than 50 people died and around 250 were injured when 15 cars of an Indian passenger train jumped tracks and crashed on its way to New Delhi.

Angel cherokee woman "O'Toole's law: Murphy was an optimist."
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Posted by cherokee woman on Wednesday, July 25, 2012 7:09 AM

For July 25th, from Arcamax History & Quotes:

In 1832, one man was killed and three others injured in the first recorded railroad accident in U.S. history. The four were thrown from an otherwise vacant car on the Granite Railway near Quincy, Mass.

Angel cherokee woman "O'Toole's law: Murphy was an optimist."
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Posted by cherokee woman on Friday, August 10, 2012 3:21 PM

From Arcamax History & Quotes for 8/10/2012:

In 2001, about 250 people were killed in a train wreck in Albania, caused by a mine set on the tracks by rebels.

From WHAS11.com's Today in History:

1885 America's first commercially operated electric streetcar began operation in Baltimore.

Angel cherokee woman "O'Toole's law: Murphy was an optimist."
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Posted by cherokee woman on Thursday, September 13, 2012 12:34 PM

From whas11.com Today in History Newsletter:

Sept. 13th:2008A commuter train engineer ran a red light while text messaging on his cell phone and struck a freight train head-on in Los Angeles, killing himself and 24 other people.

Angel cherokee woman "O'Toole's law: Murphy was an optimist."
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Posted by John WR on Thursday, September 13, 2012 1:03 PM

September 15, 1831.  The John Bull, a British built locomotive, is first operated on The Camden and Amboy Railroad between Bordentown and South Amboy, New Jersey.  The locomotive was built by Robert Stevenson and Co. for Robert Stevens, President of the C&A.  It was shipped to the US in crates and assembled by Isaac Dripps who became the first engineer.  

The John Bull ran in regular service until 1866.  It was last operated on September 15, 1985 and is now in the Smithsonian Institute.

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Posted by oltmannd on Thursday, September 13, 2012 6:53 PM

John WR

September 15, 1831.  The John Bull, a British built locomotive, is first operated on The Camden and Amboy Railroad between Bordentown and South Amboy, New Jersey.  The locomotive was built by Robert Stevenson and Co. for Robert Stevens, President of the C&A.  It was shipped to the US in crates and assembled by Isaac Dripps who became the first engineer.  

The John Bull ran in regular service until 1866.  It was last operated on September 15, 1985 and is now in the Smithsonian Institute.

Earliest Metroliner!  Smile

-Don (Random stuff, mostly about trains - what else? http://blerfblog.blogspot.com/

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Posted by John WR on Thursday, September 13, 2012 8:00 PM

oltmannd
Earliest Metroliner!  Smile

You could think of it that way.  The bottom half of New Jersey is a peninsula.  To get from New York to Philadelphia coastwise ships had to go to the southern tip of New Jersey and then go back up the Delaware Bay to Philadelphia. In a sailing vessel the wind was against you so you had to tack.  If you click here you will see how long the trip is:  

http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://i.infoplease.com/images/mnewjersey.gif&imgrefurl=http://www.infoplease.com/atlas/state/newjersey.html&h=773&w=450&sz=100&tbnid=T3TXlzFITj7mlM:&tbnh=89&tbnw=52&prev=/search%3Fq%3Dnew%2Bjersey%2Bmap%26tbm%3Disch%26tbo%3Du&zoom=1&q=new+jersey+map&usg=__yCf_6Ix_xRVDzOS0XHTQGdDwQMY=&hl=en&sa=X&ei=-X1SULXlKoSk9ATasoHoDA&ved=0CDIQ9QEwBw

If you go back to the map you will find Perth Amboy on the coast just beneath an un-named island.  That is Staten Island.  To shorten the trip people would go to Staten Island, cross the Raritan bay to Perth Amboy and take a predecessor to the Metroliner, a stagecoach, across new jersey to Bordentown which is at the bend in the state just below Trenton.  Bordentown marks the beginning of tidewater on the Delaware.  From Bordentown you took a riverboat down to Philadelphia.  

The Camden and Amboy at first replaced the stagecoach and ran from South Amboy (close to Perth Amboy) tfirst to Bordentwon and then on down to Camden, right across from Philadelphia.  It must have seemed like a Metroliner to people in those days.  

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Posted by cherokee woman on Monday, September 17, 2012 6:32 AM

For Sunday, September 16th:

Railroad magnate James Jerome J.J. Hill in 1838


Angel cherokee woman "O'Toole's law: Murphy was an optimist."
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Posted by John WR on Monday, September 17, 2012 7:01 PM

James J. Hill was a gilded age railroad man who was not a robber baron.  In 1873 he and Norman Kittson brought the St. Paul and Pacific Railroad.  Moving slowly and without Federal subsidy Hill built it along the Canadian border ultimately reaching Puget Sound.   In 1893 the Northern Pacific went bankrupt for the second time but the Great Northern did not and reach the Pacific.  When, because of the depression, farmers were going broke Hill lent them money.  When there was no industry along the line Hill brought in industry.  He said to the people who lived along his line "We will get rich together or go broke together."  And James J. Hill got very very rich.  He lived until 1916 and ran a western railroad than which none was more successful.  

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Posted by John WR on Friday, September 21, 2012 7:47 PM

September 22, 1851.  Charles Minot telegraphs "Hold the train" to the Goshen stationmaster.  Minot was the Superintendent of the Erie Railroad.  Minot was on the train at Turners, New York (Now Harriman) when it stopped because the express going in the opposite direction was late.  The Eire was a single track railroad.  There was nothing to do but wait.   Minot, an impatient man, was having none of it.  He went into the station and had the telegrapher ask if the express had arrived in Goshen.  Upon learning it had not he then telegraphed his order.  This was the first time a train order was ever given by telegraph although it would soon be the most common way orders were given.  

According to the legend when Minot returned to the train and gave the engineer an order to proceed the engineer refused to budge.  Minot then got into the engine and operated the train himself while the engineer went to the last seat in the last car for the ride.  

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Posted by John WR on Monday, September 24, 2012 9:48 AM

September 24, 1841.  The Mohawk and Hudson Railroad began running from Albany to Schenectady, New York.  The trip and circumstances are reported by Schenectady Historian Don Rittner in Railroading Began Here.  http://www.donrittner.com/his310.html

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Posted by John WR on Tuesday, September 25, 2012 11:58 PM

September 26, 1903.  Wreck of the Old 97.  Southern Railroad Engineer Steve Broady was ordered to get his train, the Fast Mail, into Spencer, Virginia "on time."  That meant he had to make up an hour.  Engineers were required to be on time because the United States Government imposed a penalty on the railroad for every minute the mail was late.  Outside of Danville was a downgrade on a curve that ended in a trestle across a ravine.  Carrying out his orders Broady descended the downgrade at about 50 mph and the train jumped the tracks and fell off the trestle into the ravine below.  Of 18 people on the train 11 were killed and the rest were injured.  This tragedy inspired a song, "The Wreck of the Old 97."

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Posted by John WR on Wednesday, September 26, 2012 8:42 PM

September 27, 1835.  Phineas Davis is killed while riding a locomotive he built, the York.  Davis designed the first coal burning American locomotive, the Atlantic.  His locomotives were grasshoppers with a vertical boiler.   They were built for the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad.  American locomotives would burn wood up until the Civil War era and of course the vertical boiler never became popular.  Ultimately, however, coal would prove to be a better fuel for steam locomotives.  

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Posted by cherokee woman on Saturday, September 29, 2012 12:22 PM

From Arcamax History & Quotes for Friday, Sept. 28th:

271 passengers were hurt, none believed seriously, when a subway train slammed into the rear of another train, in Shanghai; the latest trouble for China's rapidly expanded transportation system, plaqued with faulty signeling, poorly trained operators and other problems.

Anyone have anything else to say regarding this:  i.e. final conclusions, etc.?

Angel cherokee woman "O'Toole's law: Murphy was an optimist."
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Posted by John WR on Saturday, September 29, 2012 7:44 PM

According to The New York Times this crash happened only last year.  Today this kind of accident should never happen.  The article reports critics of the Shanghai subway say the project was pushed too fast so that proper safety precautions could not be taken.  It looks like the critics are right.  

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Posted by cacole on Sunday, September 30, 2012 10:20 AM

September 30:

In 1894, the eastbound Southern Pacific express was held up by a train robber at Maricopa, Arizona.  The robber was unable to open the safe and took only a small amount of cash and a gold watch from the train crew.

In 1924, the Interstate Commerce Commission approved the Southern Pacific Railroad plan to acquire control of the El Paso & Southwestern Railroad, and build a main line through Phoenix.

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Posted by cacole on Tuesday, October 02, 2012 9:32 AM

October 2:

In 1924, thousands of Phoenix, Arizona citizens gathered at Union Station to celebrate the arrival of the Southern Pacific mainline.

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Posted by John WR on Tuesday, October 02, 2012 7:02 PM

October 3, 1837 or October 6, sources use both dates.  The steam locomotive Sandusky, the first built by Thomas Rogers of Rogers, Ketchum and Grosvenor in Paterson, New Jersey ran from Paterson to Jersey City and then to New Brunswick.  Rogers went on to become a major manufacturer of locomotives.  

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Posted by cacole on Thursday, October 04, 2012 6:34 AM

October 4, 1905, The Maricopa County (Arizona) Board of Supervisors threatened to tear up the rails if the Phoenix Street Railway Company laid tracks on Grand Avenue in Phoenix.

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Posted by John WR on Thursday, October 04, 2012 7:09 PM

Were the streetcar rails ever laid down in Phoenix?  And if they were did the Board of Supervisors have them torn up?

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Posted by cherokee woman on Friday, October 05, 2012 3:27 PM

For Oct 4th, from Arcamax History & Quotes:

In 1883, the Orient Express made its first run.

Angel cherokee woman "O'Toole's law: Murphy was an optimist."
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Posted by cacole on Saturday, October 06, 2012 8:39 AM

October 6:

In 1906, fire destroyed the roundhouse and car shops of the (Arizona) Gila Valley, Globe & Northern railroad.

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Posted by cacole on Monday, October 08, 2012 8:58 AM

October 8th:

In 1878, Southern Pacific Railroad received a charter from the Territory of Arizona and permission to cross the Military Reservation of Yuma.

In 1908, the announcement was made that as a result of the failure of the reverberatory furnace at Helvetia, Arizona to give the proper results, 100 tons of ore would be shipped daily from Helvetia to the Old Dominion smelters at Globe.  The ore would be freighted to Vail Station, shipped on the Southern Pacific to Bowie, then on to Globe over the Gila Valley, Globe and Northern Railroad.

In 1914, the Apache Trail Stage Coach Company was chartered to haul passengers from the railroad station at Globe to Phoenix, where passengers could resume their rail journey.

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Posted by cacole on Tuesday, October 09, 2012 9:50 AM

October 9th:

In 1921, the railroad police of the Tucson, Arizona division of the Southern Pacific reported they had removed 3,373 hobos from Southern Pacific trains in one month.

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