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A Wheelie cool view!

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A Wheelie cool view!
Posted by Ottercove on Wednesday, July 29, 2009 12:26 AM

Sorry 'bout the bad pun in the subject line, but I think this photo is worth the look.

Near the end of a recent trip to railfan Steven's Pass and the BNSF Scenic sub, I made it a point to catch a train crossing the Foss River trestle.    After the power was duly recorded, I found myself waiting for 100 or more empty grain cars.  About half passed by before it dawned on me that a different kind of photo was waiting to be taken.  Remembering to bring all my lens out to the location paid off, and a quick change of lens gave me about 30 or 40 cars to perfect the shot. 

Hope you enjoy!

 http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=292232

 

Steve Carter My photography: http://www.pbase.com/ottercove
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Posted by rdamon on Wednesday, July 29, 2009 1:02 AM
Great shot ... Well worth a PCA vote!!! Robert Marietta, GA
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Posted by bedell on Wednesday, July 29, 2009 6:33 AM

Awesome shot!.  If this were an entry in a photo contest it would be the grand prize.

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Posted by edblysard on Wednesday, July 29, 2009 7:44 AM

Or in this weeks "Curves" contest...

23 17 46 11

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Posted by CNW 6000 on Wednesday, July 29, 2009 8:01 AM

Wow...

Dan

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Posted by CANADIANPACIFIC2816 on Wednesday, July 29, 2009 8:05 AM

This picture is very interesting, Steve.

NICE WORK!

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Posted by Mookie on Wednesday, July 29, 2009 8:07 AM

So many things come to mind:  I can't wait for the Driver to get home from work so I can show this to him.  I am terrified of heights - even in pictures - and you have caused that feeling!  I can't imagine how you managed this photo but it is excellent! 

When does your book of photographs come out? 

Mookie

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Posted by Paul_D_North_Jr on Wednesday, July 29, 2009 9:14 AM

WOW !!  Made my day !  Bow  Thanks for sharing !

I'll tolerate the 'bad pun' anytime for another view like this one.  Thumbs Up

I'm just blown away by the purity of this depiction of the wheel-rail-tie-ballast interface and structural hierarchy - so much so that I missed seeing the reflection in the wheel tread until I read your caption.  This photo clearly shows the essence of the technology of the railroad [another Forum member here seems to have a prior claim and a practical monopoly on the use of the term 'railway' Smile,Wink, & Grin , or I might use that word instead].  To use that polished surface as a mirror - that is a really artistic touch !  Also, I had to look twice to confirm that the subject was actually on the trestle - note the straight-and-angled segments of the outside ballast shoulder - as opposed to just being up on a fill on one of the approaches.

This is a textbook photo - not meaning a photo that's a great example of how to take photos, which it is anyway - but instead a photo that belongs in a textbook on railroads to illustrate the car-wheel - rail-track structure interface and relationships.

Most of us would think that we just have a wait ahead of us for the 100 cars to pass before doing something else interesting.  But you were perceptive enough to realize that - at least in this situation - each one of those cars represented yet another new opportunity to explore and obtain a different depiction with another angle, composition, lighting, exposure, depth of field, emphasis, relationship, and representation of this subject.  That's really 'in the moment' and deep and insightful - an important lesson to teach the value of the seemingly mundane.

I can see lots of opportunities to continue with this approach at the trestle.  For example, if you could have moved just a little to the left, you could have worked selected elements of the trestle's structure into the photo, to continue the structural 'pyramid' down towards the ground.  Or, get more of the truck sideframe to isolate it and both wheels.  Change the format to vertical, and your could work a little more of the superstructure of the car or part of an open load [lumber, for instance] into it, to show that part of the system.  I'm sure these idesas and many more have already occurred to you, though.

Steve, I keep telling you - you have a future in teaching this stuff, or doing seminars, or even just a show of some kind* - if you would choose to do so, of course [I understand if you do not, for any reason, though]. 

Thanks again very much for sharing.  I smile every time I look at it.

- Paul North.

EDIT - * or a book, as Ms. Mookie suggests above.

"This Fascinating Railroad Business" (title of 1943 book by Robert Selph Henry of the AAR)
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Posted by CANADIANPACIFIC2816 on Wednesday, July 29, 2009 9:37 AM

There is no limit as to what one can do with photography, all a photographer really needs other than the equipment itself, is a good imagination. I was told this by a professional photographer years ago while learning the basics of photography. And it is clear that Steve has a good eye for detail as well as a good sense of imagination.

Ray Loftesness II

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Posted by Modelcar on Wednesday, July 29, 2009 9:50 AM

Ottercove
Near the end of a recent trip to railfan Steven's Pass and the BNSF Scenic sub, I made it a point to catch a train crossing the Foss River trestle. 

 

Beautifully detailed and clear photo of wheel structures as they work on the track as train crossed the Foss Trestle.  And the other beautiful shots of the trestle from different locations.  Believe we've seen that night shot on here before....Very unique.

Quentin

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Posted by route_rock on Wednesday, July 29, 2009 9:58 AM

  Wow is a simple term for this. Thats is awesome and Ill let the pun slide as well lol.I think another idea would to be lower and be looking up slightly.Try that one out!

Yes we are on time but this is yesterdays train

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Posted by doghouse on Wednesday, July 29, 2009 7:47 PM

 

The picture's fine just the way it is.  How do I get a copy? 

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Posted by Ottercove on Thursday, July 30, 2009 1:09 AM

Wow!  Your responses are overwhelming and greatly appreciated, Paul especially.   I must say I feel like I'm still finding my way through this photography thing.

A little background on the location.   There isn't much room there.  Certainly not to the left, another step or two and it would have been a bad end to a great weekend.  Forward and lower might work, but it didn't look like I'd feel very "comfortable" there.    I was at about 200mm with my Canon 100-400mm lens, so yes objects appear closer than they are. 

 

Thanks again for all the great comments.

 

Steve Carter My photography: http://www.pbase.com/ottercove
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Posted by pmsteamman on Thursday, July 30, 2009 1:55 AM

Have you ever been to Joso? That is a BIG bridge. If you are lucky you may catch a tug (or Camas Prairie train) going under and a UP train going over.

Highball....Train looks good device in place!!
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Posted by dinwitty on Thursday, July 30, 2009 7:07 AM

 

my first thought,.. are they putting disc brakes on cars now?

I think PCC cars had that concept long before autos did.

then the photo hit me.

 

quite the dramatic !

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Posted by Modelcar on Thursday, July 30, 2009 8:55 AM

dinwitty

my first thought,.. are they putting disc brakes on cars now?

I think PCC cars had that concept long before autos did.

I personally don't know when PCC cars developed the concept, but I witnessed disk brakes on an automobile {testing}, back in 1956.  They were calling them "spot brakes" at that time.....

Quentin

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