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need to know how to get proper ho car weight

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  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: US
  • 45 posts
need to know how to get proper ho car weight
Posted by relucas on Friday, March 7, 2003 12:57 PM
I READ HOW TO IN MRR BUT DO I USE THE WEGHT THAT COMES WITH THE CAR BEFORE FIRET WEIGHTING OR WEIGHT ALL OF IT AND THEN FIGURE OUT WHAT IT NEEDS . THANKS FOR THE HELP...
  • Member since
    January 2001
  • From: US
  • 1,300 posts
Posted by Sperandeo on Friday, March 7, 2003 1:20 PM
To whoever this is,

Most of the time I'd include whatever weight comes in a kit and weight it along with all the parts to see how much additional weight will be needed. The only exception is in some flatcar and gondola kits that have a thin steel weight, since in those you can usually get more weight into the car by replacing the steel with a sheet lead weight of the same size.

Good luck,

Andy

Andy Sperandeo
MODEL RAILROADER Magazine

Andy Sperandeo MODEL RAILROADER Magazine

  • Member since
    March 2002
  • From: Milwaukee WI (Fox Point)
  • 10,494 posts
Posted by dknelson on Monday, March 10, 2003 8:55 AM
I have a small digital postal scale and I post the NMRA car weighting standards on the wall for quick reference. When building a kit I take all the parts including the KD couplers and metal wheels I intend to use and put them on the scale (remove the parts from sprues). I make a note of how much more weight is needed. Often nothing is. Remember that for box cars and reefers this stage might be the time to add weight. Also when considering commercial weights do a little calculation -- how much does it cost per ounce and how that does that compare to actually using pennies. You might find that pennies are cheaper! I use double sided tape (remembering that that too adds weight) or Walthers Goo to fasten weight to car floor or to the supplied metal weight but if you use Goo remember to drill a small hole in the floor of the car to let the fumes escape or they can build up and cause the car to bulge -- this actually happened to me!!! Also I find that weight is best if right over the wheels, but remember that some trucks screw in with the tip of the screw extending above the car floor.

For flat cars and gons Andy's advice about using lead is good -- I buy sheet lead and cut it with a sissors which I devote to that use. Don't forget solder as a source of weight either. But remember to wash your hands immediately after touching lead and never touch your mouth without having washed your hands. In fact I paint my lead with several coats of acrylic paints after I cut them to size to avoid having raw lead be touched by anybody.
One tip for gons. The old Varney gon which you still see at swap meets is pure plastic and seems to weight next to nothing. I put sheet lead in the bottom of the gon (there is no room below) - then I cut a floor from another cheap gon I bought at a swap meet and covered the lead with that so that the floor of the gon has rivet detail and is not smooth lead. Carefully done you can hardly see that the floor is actually quite thick. Save the sides of the gon as scrap loads or even bridge girders.
Dave Nelson
  • Member since
    February 2001
  • From: El Dorado Springs, MO
  • 1,519 posts
Posted by n2mopac on Wednesday, March 12, 2003 9:50 PM
Another great source of weight, especially for enclosed rolling stock, is fishing weights. They come in a variety of sizes/weights, they are soft and easily flattened and shaped, and best of all, they're cheap!!! The key is to be sure the weight is evenly distributed end-to-endd and side-to-side. I attach the weights with Walthers Goo or with CA. Yes, you definately want to weith all of the parts and the added weights to the correct specs before you begin to assemble the car, as this is usually the easiest time to add weight and decide where it can best be placed and disguised.
Ron

Owner and superintendant of the N scale Texas Colorado & Western Railway, a protolanced representaion of the BNSF from Fort Worth, TX through Wichita Falls TX and into Colorado. 

Check out the TC&WRy on at https://www.facebook.com/TCWRy

Check out my MRR How-To YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/c/RonsTrainsNThings

 

  • Member since
    May 2001
  • From: US
  • 39 posts
Posted by ronsmith on Thursday, March 13, 2003 11:26 AM
Another great and cheap source for weights is
tire weights; that is all I use for my tank car fleet. Tire weights can be found on all streets;
especially at four way stop intersections. I also
use a lot of JB Weld to adhere weights to car.
Tire shops will sometimes give you old weights.
Ron
Garland, TX

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