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Repaint shortcut

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  • Member since
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  • From: Harrisburg, PA
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Repaint shortcut
Posted by hbgatsf on Saturday, July 31, 2021 8:48 PM

I want to add a switcher to my steel mill.  Existing locomotives are black with yellow accents. 

I found a new unit that is very close to what I want the loco to look like.  I just need to change the logo and cover the road name.  Since many mills bought used locomotives and repainted them I was wondering if I could get away with just covering what I don't want with black paint, put a new logo on and weather it.  That may turn out looking more prototypical than a shiny new model.  If I don't like it I can just start over and do it the right way.  

Has anyone else done something like this?

Rick

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Posted by gmpullman on Saturday, July 31, 2021 8:52 PM

hbgatsf
Has anyone else done something like this?

Yes, I have.

I found that Microscale "Trim Film" to be a handy source for making "Patch outs" rather than going the paint route.

Good Luck, Ed

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Posted by MisterBeasley on Saturday, July 31, 2021 10:03 PM

I have a couple of yard switchers that are mostly black with yellow lettering.  I plan to mask them and paint over part of the black paint with Milwaukee orange.  No, it won't be a prototypical paint scheme, but who's going to notice?

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

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Posted by 7j43k on Saturday, July 31, 2021 10:57 PM

hbgatsf

Existing locomotives are black with yellow accents. 

 

Has anyone else done something like this?

 

 

Absolutely not!  Whatever are you thinking??

 

Mine are yellow with black striping!  THAT'S the proper way to go.

 

I like where you're going with this--I'd do it too.

 

Ed

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Posted by ndbprr on Sunday, August 1, 2021 6:17 AM

If the real railroads can do it so can we.  Years ago there was a picture inTrains of just such a paint job. After the Penn Central merger at least one ex PRR crew would peal the black paint off to reveal the keystones.

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Posted by hbgatsf on Sunday, August 1, 2021 7:13 AM

ndbprr

If the real railroads can do it so can we.  Years ago there was a picture inTrains of just such a paint job. After the Penn Central merger at least one ex PRR crew would peal the black paint off to reveal the keystones.

 

I always wondered how good a paint job was done, especially with the mergers where many locomotives needed to be done.  How good they prepped them would go a long way to making it look good, and that would be tough with years of grime and rust on them.

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Posted by richhotrain on Sunday, August 1, 2021 7:33 AM

hbgatsf

I found a new unit that is very close to what I want the loco to look like.  I just need to change the logo and cover the road name.  Since many mills bought used locomotives and repainted them I was wondering if I could get away with just covering what I don't want with black paint, put a new logo on and weather it.  That may turn out looking more prototypical than a shiny new model.  If I don't like it I can just start over and do it the right way.  

Go for it! Like you say, you have nothing to lose.  Yes

Rich

Alton Junction

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Posted by NHTX on Sunday, August 1, 2021 8:34 AM

    A lot of the patch-outs were done with a roller or spray gun, with no masking involved.  This produced crooked or feathered edges which neatly cut trim film will not provide.  Circus City Decals produces blank patches in many colors, including black and white, in all the popular scales.  The patches replicate the hasty, free-hand appearance of the prototype.  www.circuscitydecals.com  or www.greatdecals.com 

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Posted by hbgatsf on Sunday, August 1, 2021 9:21 AM

Thanks for the replies.  I ordered the locomotive.  Now I need to decide how I am going to do this.

If I am reading the replies correctly, using trim film is just putting a blank decal over the lettering I don't want?  Do you then paint over that to feather it in?

If I just decide to paint over the lettering, should I do anything first like a primer coat?  I will be painting black over yellow lettering.

Edit: I should add that in my original post I wasn't thinking along the lines of the roller or spray paint patch-out, but that I didn't need to be overly concerned with it looking like new.  After weathering I thought it could be something you wouldn't notice.

Rick

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Posted by ricktrains4824 on Sunday, August 1, 2021 6:10 PM

The only issue I could see, is that if it's decal or thick lettering, the new paint will still show "ghosting" through it.

Trim film decals will help hide this.

But, if you are modeling a second (or even third) hand unit, that may not be necessarilly a bad thing.

Ricky W.

HO scale Proto-freelancer.

My Railroad rules:

1: It's my railroad, my rules.

2: It's for having fun and enjoyment.

3: Any objections, consult above rules.

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Posted by gmpullman on Sunday, August 1, 2021 7:49 PM

ricktrains4824
But, if you are modeling a second (or even third) hand unit, that may not be necessarilly a bad thing.

That was the look I was going after with this Penn-Central, ex-Pennsylvania sleeper:

 IMG_0009_fix by Edmund, on Flickr

I remember seeing these in the "pre-Amtrak" days and you could frequently see the ghosting of the former lettering.

As previously mentioned, the railroads didn't make a great effort to do much prep work or use the best quality paint for the "patch out":

 Penn Central E-7 & E-8 at Chicago IL Oct 1974 by Mark LLanuza, on Flickr

This was especially true if the paint was applied over ScotchLite reflective vinyl which was thicker than paint, much more difficult to remove and paint did not adhere to it very well especially in the railroad environment.

Some roads had the forethought to patch out in the "future" color of the car, when time and money, if ever, became available for a full repaint:

 PC_X58 by Edmund, on Flickr

Regards, Ed

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Posted by hbgatsf on Monday, August 2, 2021 6:36 AM

Good stuff.  Thank you.

The locomotive I am going to paint is the new Walthers Mainline SW7.  Does anyone know how thick the lettering is on Walthers models in general?  

I have an Atlas MP15DC done for US Steel.  I am going to alter the Walthers D&TS to have a similar look.

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Rick

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Posted by hbgatsf on Monday, August 2, 2021 8:01 AM

I was looking over some threads on repainting lthat I had bookmarked and saw an interesting comment in one.  It was stated that the Walthers models do not use decals, they are pad painted.  It was stated that Solvaset could be used to take it off leaving the original paint intact.

This may turn out to be easier than I thought.

 

Rick

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Posted by Lastspikemike on Monday, August 2, 2021 8:32 AM

There are numerous and conflicting threads about this topic. Decal solvent generally doesn't take off paint. Also, painted lettering usually leaves a ghost image even after the paint is gone.

One cstrains thread says Solvaset is propylene glycol monomethyl ether plus propanol and other minor chemicals. It can strip paint. It probably depends what type of paint is on the model.

Alyth Yard

Canada

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Monday, August 2, 2021 10:40 AM

hbgatsf
This may turn out to be easier than I thought.

I have had many people tell me this works, but it did not work for me. 

I tried to remove the lettering from two Walthers Circus Train flat cars with no luck using Solvaset. 

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by richhotrain on Tuesday, August 3, 2021 6:01 AM

hbgatsf

I was looking over some threads on repainting lthat I had bookmarked and saw an interesting comment in one.  It was stated that the Walthers models do not use decals, they are pad painted.  It was stated that Solvaset could be used to take it off leaving the original paint intact.

This may turn out to be easier than I thought. 

Rick 

Go for it.

Rich

Alton Junction

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Posted by ndbprr on Tuesday, August 3, 2021 8:31 AM

I had success using a very light abrasive at that time called Bar Keepers Friend.  I rubbed it over the lettering which smoothed the edges and put some tooth in the body before painting.

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