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Making A Gauntlet Track

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Making A Gauntlet Track
Posted by caldreamer on Saturday, July 31, 2021 8:25 PM

On the Trains General Discussion forum there is a question posted about gauntlet tracks.  Has anyone made a gauntlet track and if so in what scale?

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Posted by gmpullman on Saturday, July 31, 2021 8:41 PM

A fellow I once knew near me had a pretty extensive layout in HO and he built a hand-laid gauntlet. It was interesting but being right on the main line there was no way to simply let two trains run at will on the mostly double track main.

Operations-wise it kept operators on their toes. It was simply a pair of frogs laid onto wood switch ties. Pretty easy to make.

The Erie Railroad used a gauntlet on their main line through Warren, Ohio.

 Erie_Warren_Gauntlet by Edmund, on Flickr

I believe some tunnels used gauntlets to center the clearance height once excess height cars became more prevalent.

I've seen both frog gauntlets and point gauntlets, the latter sometimes used at scale tracks or more frequently today, as high speed through tracks at passenger stations where wider clearance is needed at high-level platforms.

 

Good Luck, Ed

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Posted by gregc on Sunday, August 1, 2021 5:02 AM

another use is on a scale track

greg - Philadelphia & Reading / Reading

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Posted by dehusman on Sunday, August 1, 2021 7:35 AM

A scale track is more or less the opposite of a gantlet track. 

With a gantlet track there are two tracks that merge into one, on scale track there is one track that becomes two.

A gantlet track has two frogs and no switches, no moving parts.  A scale track has two switches and no frogs.

Dave H. Painted side goes up. My website : wnbranch.com

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Posted by richhotrain on Sunday, August 1, 2021 7:38 AM

Hmm, that could solve my problem with a single track truss bridge that I have no other use for on my double track main - - - a gantlet track!

Too bad that the track has to be handlaid.

Rich

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Posted by gregc on Sunday, August 1, 2021 7:51 AM

dehusman
With a gantlet track there are two tracks that merge into one, on scale track there is one track that becomes two.

hadn't considered that (another learning experience).   wiki suggests some varieties including Point gauntlet/interlaced loop seen in following which allows train to get closer to platform

and the following shows a triple

 

243 

greg - Philadelphia & Reading / Reading

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Posted by DSchmitt on Sunday, August 1, 2021 8:47 AM

 

I tried to sell my two cents worth, but no one would give me a plug nickel for it.

I don't have a leg to stand on.

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Posted by fmilhaupt on Sunday, August 1, 2021 9:22 AM

In the early days of my HO modular club (late 1980s) one of the members built a neat scene with a handlaid gantlet track on a six-foot module, bypassing a track gang fixing a partial washout on one of the tracks. There were manually-controlled signals at the end, and it was a nice model.

It looked neat, but it was an operating problem, since about half the club members weren't always too good at paying close attention to where their train was. The gantlet track turned that section of the railroad into six feet of single-track main, so we had more than our fair share of collisions.

This same member built a large, gorgeous horseshoe-shaped end where one main climbed up over the other on a bridge while both crossed a river. To get the mainlines back into their proper orientation, he hid a grade-level crossing inside of a tunnel at one end of the set of modules. Again, "hilarity ensued" frequently when a member lost track of where his train was when it approached the tunnel. That got really old in a hurry.

Given that the layout was built as an exhibition layout, and most of our members were pretty gregarious and always willing to speak with the public, neither the gantlet track nor the crossover in the tunnel were very practical when running for the public. We were able to reduce the number of problems by always placing the gantlet track module right next to the end of the tunnel that contained the crossover. It put all of the choke points into one place, at least.

-Fritz Milhaupt, Publications Editor, Pere Marquette Historical Society, Inc.
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Posted by DSchmitt on Sunday, August 1, 2021 9:28 AM

[quote user="DSchmitt"]

 

 Then can use points to make a Scale Track 

 

I tried to sell my two cents worth, but no one would give me a plug nickel for it.

I don't have a leg to stand on.

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Posted by DanRaitz on Sunday, August 1, 2021 9:53 AM

You can always use these.

Code 83 & 70 ME (cvmw.com)

or the Fast Tracks system, for both Gantlet frogs + track (cross-tie strips)

Fast Tracks - Helping the World Build Better Railroads (handlaidtrack.com)

 

Dan

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Posted by CSX Robert on Monday, August 2, 2021 11:12 AM

dehusman
A scale track is more or less the opposite of a gantlet track. 

A scale track as shown above is a gauntlet track.  A gauntlet track is where two parallel tracks are interlaced to run together.  Whether the parallel lines were two separate lines brought together or a single line split in two (it could even be two lines at one end and one at the other, it's still a gauntlet track.

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Posted by richhotrain on Tuesday, August 3, 2021 6:53 AM

CSX Robert
 
dehusman
A scale track is more or less the opposite of a gantlet track.  

A scale track as shown above is a gauntlet track.  A gauntlet track is where two parallel tracks are interlaced to run together.  Whether the parallel lines were two separate lines brought together or a single line split in two (it could even be two lines at one end and one at the other, it's still a gauntlet track. 

Interesting thread. 

I now find myself looking for an opportunity to add a gantlet track. It would be a good way to add back my single track truss bridge on my double track mainline.

Rich

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Posted by gmpullman on Tuesday, August 3, 2021 6:59 AM

richhotrain
I now find myself looking for an opportunity to add a gantlet track.

In Bellows Falls there is a siding that has the switch points on one side of the river, two pair of rails across the bridge and the frog on the other side of the river:

 Bellows Falls by James House, on Flickr

That would make an interesting enough track layout without actually making a bottleneck on the main line.

https://www.handlaidtrack.com/af-ho-g-6-me83

 

Regards, Ed

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Posted by gregc on Tuesday, August 3, 2021 7:24 AM

my understanding of this image is that it is a turnout on the bridge.   the points are on the opposite side of the bridge

greg - Philadelphia & Reading / Reading

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Posted by gmpullman on Tuesday, August 3, 2021 7:31 AM

gregc
my understanding of this image is that it is a turnout on the bridge.   the points are on the opposite side of the bridge

 

Yeah, right.

My description is way out in left field.

gmpullman
In Bellows Falls there is a siding that has the switch points on one side of the river, two pair of rails across the bridge and the frog on the other side of the river:

Thanks for clearing that up.

Huh?  Ed

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Posted by BEAUSABRE on Tuesday, August 3, 2021 8:04 AM
One offbeat design has an east-west line going across a bridge with another line coming in from the south to form a gantlet across the bridge and diverging to the north 0n the other side, in effect a sort of crossing
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Posted by richhotrain on Tuesday, August 3, 2021 8:08 AM

gmpullman
 
richhotrain
I now find myself looking for an opportunity to add a gantlet track. 

In Bellows Falls there is a siding that has the switch points on one side of the river, two pair of rails across the bridge and the frog on the other side of the river:

 Bellows Falls by James House, on Flickr

That would make an interesting enough track layout without actually making a bottleneck on the main line.

https://www.handlaidtrack.com/af-ho-g-6-me83 

Regards, Ed 

I like that. It sure would be easier to add a siding than to mess with my double mainline.  Yes

Rich

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Tuesday, August 3, 2021 10:16 AM

Does anyone know for sure the proper way to pronounce Gauntlet Track.

I always assumed it was GAWNT LET like the iron glove your throw down.

However, I have heard people pronounce the word GANT LET and GANT LAY when discussing railroad trackage.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by richhotrain on Tuesday, August 3, 2021 10:46 AM

SeeYou190

Does anyone know for sure the proper way to pronounce Gauntlet Track.

I always assumed it was GAWNT LET like the iron glove your throw down.

However, I have heard people pronounce the word GANT LET and GANT LAY when discussing railroad trackage.

-Kevin 

However you spell it is how you pronounce it.

Gantlet - Pronounced GANT-LET

Gaunlet - Pronounced GAWNT-LET

Rich

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Posted by richhotrain on Tuesday, August 3, 2021 3:36 PM

gregc

That's one accepted definition. Here is another.

A section of double railroad tracks formed by the temporary convergence of two otherwise parallel tracks in such a way that each set remains independent while traversing the same ground, affording passage at a narrow place without need of switching.

Rich

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Posted by gregc on Tuesday, August 3, 2021 7:25 PM

where did that come from?  (link)

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Posted by richhotrain on Wednesday, August 4, 2021 5:22 AM

gregc

where did that come from?  (link) 

https://www.thefreedictionary.com/gantlet

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