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Logging modelers

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Logging modelers
Posted by tatans on Monday, January 27, 2020 1:01 PM

Has anyone asked the percentage of modelers that operate  "logging''  specific  operations, I  wonder if theses statistics are available from the NMRA, logging seems to be very rare on this forum and only occasionally do we see any mention about it- - -I'm asking about 100% logging operations only.

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Posted by mbinsewi on Monday, January 27, 2020 3:24 PM

I've been watching, to see if anyone would chime in.  I don't remember any specific member in her with a logging only layout.

Some have a narrow gauge logging ops as I side to their main layout.

I think the guy from Denmark has a loggin layout, Grafen?  Not sure.

Mike.

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Posted by trainnut1250 on Monday, January 27, 2020 5:53 PM

100% logging operations on a model railroad are pretty rare. Many of us have a significant logging footprint on our layouts, but not 100%.

 

Fo 100% logging Modeling, I suggest you try modelers who do the Westside as their railroad of choice - two names to google are Bob Poli and Steve Anderson. Both of these guys are Westside modelers. Steve was featured on the cover of model railroader @ 2000 and Bob is a regular contributor to the Gazette.

 

Guy

see stuff at: the Willoughby Line Site

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Posted by BigDaddy on Monday, January 27, 2020 6:05 PM

David Popp has another. 

Don't get me wrong, anyone is free to ask any question here, but if it's 2%, 6% or 15% does that change your modeling plans?   If logging railroads are everyone's favorite by a Landslide, did we not learn anything in 2018?

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by Tinplate Toddler on Monday, January 27, 2020 6:23 PM

mbinsewi
I think the guy from Denmark has a loggin layout, Grafen?

That´s Graffen and he is from Sweden, I think. His layout is based on the D&RGW NG lines.

Happy times!

Ulrich (aka The Tin Man)

"You´re never too old for a happy childhood!"

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Posted by mbinsewi on Monday, January 27, 2020 8:04 PM

Thanks Ulrich.  

Mike.

 

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Posted by wvg_ca on Monday, January 27, 2020 11:24 PM

nope, not logging only .... maybe 2/3 or so ..

rest is mining, needed someplace for the beams to be used rather than just ties, lol

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Posted by selector on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 1:41 AM

I think the late Paul Templar (Shamus) was known for his logging layout.

The first couple of rows of images in the link 'should' be examples of his layout.  If it's all unrelated garbage, please accept my apologies.

https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=shamus%2cpaul+templar&id=8C78F9C4EB1DFEB7DD9FE20D3B4D6A0466C16C0A&FORM=IQFRBA

 

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Posted by tbdanny on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 4:13 AM

I've got a layout that's almost 100% logging.  The exception is a mine train with trackage rights, which runs from staging to the interchange, swaps consists, and runs back again.

My layout's operations focus on taking supplies and picking up logs from log camps.

The Location: Forests of the Pacific Northwest, Oregon
The Year: 1948
The Scale: On30
The Blog: http://bvlcorr.tumblr.com

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Posted by mbinsewi on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 6:27 AM

Nice, tbd, I took a look at a few of your blog pages.  Nice layout!

Mike.

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Posted by snjroy on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 8:23 AM

100% logging on a home layout would not be terribly exciting from an operations perspective. But I have seen portable layouts at shows like that. No need for loops, just end to end just like the real thing.

Simon

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Posted by tatans on Sunday, February 2, 2020 12:41 PM

I have seen a logging road layout in Maine and it was a pretty busy operation, lots of switchbacks and lots of back and forth  with logging traffic, but as the above comments logging is NOT up there with the top 5 ( or 25) layout systems- - - so back to hiding our logging layouts in the dark abyss away from you highliner guys and we may also be banished at train shows with a large ''L''  on our foreheads.

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Sunday, February 2, 2020 12:52 PM

Logging is suggested in my layout plan on the branch run to Great Divide. Nothing on the layout.

.

-Kevin

.

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by tbdanny on Sunday, February 2, 2020 11:42 PM

snjroy

100% logging on a home layout would not be terribly exciting from an operations perspective. But I have seen portable layouts at shows like that. No need for loops, just end to end just like the real thing.

Simon

 

 

I've found it interesting, although that may be a question of personal taste.  I've also got regularly scheduled supply and MOW trains, that take supplies to the logging camps and check the tracks.

The Location: Forests of the Pacific Northwest, Oregon
The Year: 1948
The Scale: On30
The Blog: http://bvlcorr.tumblr.com

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Posted by Tinplate Toddler on Sunday, February 2, 2020 11:56 PM

snjroy

100% logging on a home layout would not be terribly exciting from an operations perspective. But I have seen portable layouts at shows like that. No need for loops, just end to end just like the real thing.

Simon

 

I wouldn´t necessarily agree to that. Trains hauling loggers in and out of camp, supply trains, empties up to loading site, loaded trains down to sawmill and the Friday night train taking the lumberjacks into town to spend their hard-earned cash leaves a lot of room for an operation session.

Happy times!

Ulrich (aka The Tin Man)

"You´re never too old for a happy childhood!"

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Posted by dstarr on Monday, February 3, 2020 6:55 AM

I run trains of pulpwood, off to the paper mills.  Both the paper mills and the forest operations are off the layout, but I do have the pulpwood traffic.

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Posted by mlehman on Monday, February 3, 2020 10:04 AM

I must confess to being less than 100% logging, but I've got lots going on. We serve several logging camps, as well as the extractive inductries associated with logging. Since I model mostly Colorado narrowgauge, my logging ops tend to be more ambitious than prototype. Camp 13, for instance, has a loader that's considerably larger than anything that worked in Colorado.

While split apart at the loader above, lots of the traffic consists of longer poles that will be treated for powerlines applications. I adapted known Rio Grande rolling stock to suit my needs.

We even recently acquired a Shay.

Most of the logging cars are Micro-Trains HOn3 cars, plus a couple of Keystone ones. I recently added a pair of Michidan-California cars, but they are so dainty I'm not sure how they'll holdup being banged around here.

This is Camp 10.

Processing takes place in several locations. This is the tie mill at Crater Lake. Ties cut here are sent to Alamosa, along with most long poles, for treatment at the plant there.

After a line-haul of varying length, many logs make their way to the big mill at Rockwood, a major shipping point for lumber and beams.

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

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Posted by cv_acr on Monday, February 3, 2020 12:56 PM

Mine's not exactly a logging railroad, but it does carry a fair bit of pulpwood logs from different loading points.

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Posted by tatans on Wednesday, February 5, 2020 5:30 PM

mlehman

I must confess to being less than 100% logging, but I've got lots going on. We serve several logging camps, as well as the extractive inductries associated with logging. Since I model mostly Colorado narrowgauge, my logging ops tend to be more ambitious than prototype. Camp 13, for instance, has a loader that's considerably larger than anything that worked in Colorado.

While split apart at the loader above, lots of the traffic consists of longer poles that will be treated for powerlines applications. I adapted known Rio Grande rolling stock to suit my needs.

We even recently acquired a Shay.

Most of the logging cars are Micro-Trains HOn3 cars, plus a couple of Keystone ones. I recently added a pair of Michidan-California cars, but they are so dainty I'm not sure how they'll holdup being banged around here.

This is Camp 10.

Processing takes place in several locations. This is the tie mill at Crater Lake. Ties cut here are sent to Alamosa, along with most long poles, for treatment at the plant there.

After a line-haul of varying length, many logs make their way to the big mill at Rockwood, a major shipping point for lumber and beams.

 

I'd say you were pretty well up there in the logging business judging by your photos, great job and classic timber scenes for sure- - - nicework !

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Posted by mlehman on Thursday, February 6, 2020 1:52 AM

tatans
I'd say you were pretty well up there in the logging business judging by your photos, great job and classic timber scenes for sure- - - nicework !

Thanks. Logging is a lot of fun because the open loads most frequently involved help keep it real, even if you go beyond the prototype as I have with my exaggerated level of logging ops vs history, at least in Colorado. I also have somewhere north of 7,500 trees on the layout, which helps set the stage for cutting some of them down. Wink

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

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Posted by tatans on Thursday, February 6, 2020 1:12 PM
Now your only worry with that forest of trees is a forest fire, you may need a water bomber in the future, we have lots of them up here in Canadaland.
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Posted by railandsail on Friday, February 7, 2020 9:35 AM

A good size portion of my new double deck layout is going to include logging. I had started a subject thread on it (Logging Locos, Logging Track Plan, Logging Mill, Mainline Pick-up), but it got shut down and voided as it had photos that were posted on another rr forum site.


 

 

I also recently ran across a MARVELOUS little logging rr that an 83 year old fellow built in a 7 x 8 foot space. But again it is on another forum site. Here is one comment,...

Fantastic, One of the nicest small railroads I’ve seen. I have a similar small room in my garage that I have been thinking of building a small layout in to get out of the basement in the summer. I am looking a granite quarries or possible logging. Thanks for sharing what can be done in such a small space. ????

Best layout visit I've seen ANYWHERE. A beautiful work of art with so many vistas in such a small space. 

I too find this layout incredibly inspirational.

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Posted by mbinsewi on Friday, February 7, 2020 9:41 AM

Brian, you could still post a link to the article, or the layout.  I'd love to see that.

Mike.

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Posted by mlehman on Friday, February 7, 2020 2:17 PM

tatans
you may need a water bomber in the future, we have lots of them up here in Canadaland.

Oh yeah, been there, seen some...

We do have an old Gosling/Goose flying around here that might be converted.

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

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Posted by railandsail on Friday, February 7, 2020 7:03 PM

mbinsewi

Brian, you could still post a link to the article, or the layout.  I'd love to see that.

Mike.

 

Can't even post a link, but if you send me an email (NOT a private one from this site, that does not work for me), I can let you know.

My email is railandsail@gmail.com

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Posted by mbinsewi on Friday, February 7, 2020 8:54 PM

Sent you a PM.

Mike.

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Posted by mbinsewi on Monday, February 10, 2020 2:44 PM

Brian, that link you sent me is a beautiful, and expertly done layout, 100% logging, and in a small area!   It's ashamed it can't be shared in here.

Mike.

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Posted by GN_Fan on Friday, February 14, 2020 12:05 PM

I read with interest most of the posts and looked at all of the photos. Many kudos for those that want to model a somewhat forgotten aspect of railroading. I presently do not have a layout, only a sawmill diaramma featuring many kits from Better Than Scratch (BTS), and 16 Kadee skeleton log flats.  Logging and milling will be my major industrial customer, but there will be others, like in real life.

However, I did work as a degreed forester for many years, both in the woods as a forester and with a mill as a log yard supervisor. Unfortunately, it was in an era when logging railroads were VERY scarce, altho I did walk some abandoned roadbed of the old Anaconda Copper Co logging operations on the Lubrecht Forest near Greenough, MT. I saw many log loads come into the Anaconda mill at Bonner, MT via the NP, which were kind a cross between a normal flat with bunks and a skeleton log flat. They had a center beam, 4 bunks, and lengthwise outer beams. If I remember correctly, the GN log flats were similar. NP chip cars were GS gondolas with high wood extensions added on top, while the GN cars looked new and purpose built.

I love the pics that people have posted but have one bit of advice. Logging is extremely MESSY and not at all neat and tidy. The movement of logs, whether it be in the woods, on the landing, in transit, or at the mill, knocks a LOT of bark off the logs. Our mill processed on the average 18 truckloads (all were loads were over weight and over height...no scales to cross...they ran around 80,000 pounds including the truck)) of logs per day, altho that did hit a high of 55-60 during one intense period around 1980-81 or so. Our log yard had around 15 log decks that were 600 feet long and 12 feet high. The standard log length was 32 feet nominal (33 feet actual) altho that ranged from 12.5 feet for the shortest and 41 feet for the longest. The longest was almost always lodgepole pine with a minimum top diameter. The average log diameter was around 12-15 inches on the small end and had an average of 2 inches of taper per 16 feet.

We scraped the log yard 2-3 times per year with a Cat 966 and a modified dozer blade stuck on the log tines. We had to get rid of the accumulated busted-up bark that was now dust (or mud if wet). To get an idea of how it was, the dust was 8 inches deep and would completely oblierate heavy machinery moving thru the yard. In freeze-thaw conditions, the accumulated mud kicked up by my front wheel drive Honda froze in the wheel wells until I couldn’t steer any more.

So guys...in the woods…logging slash everywhere...limbs, tops, cull logs, deadwood, stumps...to be piled or windrowed and burrned off in the fall (fun job – loved it), and busted up bark, dirt, mud, and other debis on the logging flats...it piled up until it fell or got knocked off. Log ponds (if used...ours wasn’t) are sludgy brown and full of floaty things, the water is murky, not clean, and it doesn’t need a water source because it’s POND and at the water table. Ours was about 20-30 down from the surface but was unused and being filled in with the gunk from the log yard and other stuff we couldn’t sell...like chips containing char and other crap like that.

So ya, keep up the good work but make it messy.  The road leading in to the log yard was lined with old, busted machinery...old straddle buggies, junked forklifts, wheels, shafts, old busted barrels, scrap metal, just all kinds of industial junk...and don't forget the dynamite shed and the scale shack.

Alea Iacta Est -- The Die Is Cast
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Posted by mike_ruby on Thursday, February 20, 2020 1:17 PM

I have a 100% logging exhibition layout, although it hasn't been setup for a few years, it has been my home layout at various times.

If I could figure out how I would post photos!

Mike Ruby

 

 

 

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Posted by railandsail on Friday, February 21, 2020 9:09 AM

Hi Mike, would love to see your photos. This site itself does not host the photos themselves. I had problems with that in the past.

I looked around at a number of photo hosting sites, and finally decided on this one that made it fairly easy for me to keep track of the photos I wanted to post,...in an album form,....and gave me lots of ways to reference them. Plus you can upload them in batches rather than one-by-one.

https://imgbb.com/

mine as an example,...https://beiland.imgbb.com/albums

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