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#80 drill bits

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  • From: Columbia, IL
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#80 drill bits
Posted by wdcrvr on Wednesday, August 21, 2019 4:19 PM

I need #80 drill bits to make holes to attach grab irons to caboose kits.  I purchased a pack of ten on Ebay but they seem to be lousy to me.  It is extremely difficult to get them to actually drill through the plastic.  It takes forever to very carefully drill a small hole without bending or breaking the bit.  I don't think these bits are very sharp.  Can anyone recommend a good source of high quality #80 bits?  I am willing to pay more for a better product.

Thanks

wdcrvr

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Posted by RR_Mel on Wednesday, August 21, 2019 4:39 PM

I also buy my small bits off eBay and that is normal from my experience.  The smaller the hole the slower the drilling.  Also I have found out through experience the slower the drilling speed the better.
 
If possible I use my Dremel Drill Press.  I built an adapter to hold a battery powered drill/screwdriver at 200RPM.  For drilling holes that I can’t do with my drill press it’s a thumb vise and that’s not an easy task for shaky hands Mel.
 
I have had pretty good experience using my Craftsman 4 volt drill with a micro chuck in the hex shaft.  They break very easy no mater how carefully I try.
 
 
Mel
 
 
My Model Railroad   
 
Bakersfield, California
 
I'm beginning to realize that aging is not for wimps.
 
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Posted by SeeYou190 on Wednesday, August 21, 2019 4:39 PM

I buy all my drill bits from drillbitsunlimited <dot> com.

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They are a different style than most people in here prefer, but I get excellent results with them.

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I use a #78 for grab irons with better results.

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-Kevin

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Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by HO-Velo on Wednesday, August 21, 2019 7:19 PM

You're correct, beware.  After the local hobby shop closed I took a chance on some small cheap drill bits at a train show, got what I paid for, junk.

Good luck, Peter  

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Posted by mbinsewi on Wednesday, August 21, 2019 8:34 PM

My main hobby shop carries #80 bits from Walthers, 2 in a package, and they work good as far as I'm concerned.

I use a pin vise, leave only a little of the bit exposed, and take my time.

I've also found that even when they do break, they will still work, in a pinch.

I also use the #78's, after I've managed to break the #80's, makes things a little easier.

Mike.

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Posted by doctorwayne on Wednesday, August 21, 2019 8:58 PM

I seem to be able to break #80 bits simply by thinking about using them.  However, I've had decent experiences using #79s instead.  I generally use them in a pin vise, and on one occasion, was using them to add wire grabirons to 7 Dominion/Fowler boxcars.  Each car required 74 holes, and I completed 514 of them with one bit (not in one sitting, though).  Unfortunately, for the last four holes, I used four bits, breaking first the original one and then two others. 



I also have a small collet from MicroMark, capable of holding a #79 bit, that snaps right into my Dewalt cordless impact driver.  By steadying the driver in the drawer of my work desk, it's easy to manipulate the work to match the position of the driver and its drill bit.  It's important when using a motorised tool to keep the rpms low, especially when working with plastic.

I buy all of my small number-type drill bits at a nearby tool supply store, and the last time I bought #79s, the cost was about $36.00 for ten good-quality bits.

Here's a trade show sample from the late '50s, that my father brought home from either Chicago or New York City...

Now that's precision work!

Wayne

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Posted by G Paine on Wednesday, August 21, 2019 10:50 PM

If you have a hobby shop, or can check online, Mascot sells a #80 drill bit package of 12. A pretty good buy when you consider how fragile those drill are. I have bought Mascot before, thay are good quality drills.

https://www.walthers.com/carbon-twist-drill-pkg-12-80

 

George In Midcoast Maine, 'bout halfway up the Rockland branch 

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Posted by PC101 on Wednesday, August 21, 2019 11:51 PM

Well I thought everybody would have no less then ten #80 drill bits at there work bench.Surprise I have both types shown above, straight and the ones with the larger shank. I have never used a very slow power tool to drill with these bits, maybe I'll try it sometime. I use a pin vise, here's how...The work is secured in front of me, so the hole to be drilled will be perpendicular/straight down to the work bench surface, left wrist is supported on the workbench or wood blocks depending on height. Using the index/pointer finger on the top of the pin vise top head, thumb and middle finger on the sides of the pin vise's top head. Now place the bit's tip on the location where the hole is to be. This left hand holds the pin vise solid, now with the right hand, again supported on the workbench or wood blocks, using the thumb and middle finger (these two digits feel comfortable for me), close to the bit, spin the tool (with light downward pressure with the left hand) clockwise so the bit cuts (slowly) into the plastic or whatever your drilling. I am right handed. I have not used the medical terminology for the digits.

My bits have names of :

EXCEL HOBBY BLADES, 12 HI SPEED TWIST DRILLS #98171-00080

MODEL EXPO INC. 10 HI SPEED TWIST DRILLS #80 

I would love to see the machine that cuts the flutes in those teeny tiny bits.

I always have extra stuff in stock, I hate to be in the middle of a project and have to shut it down because the LHS is closed at 12:30am.  

      

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Posted by hon30critter on Thursday, August 22, 2019 4:13 AM

I will echo doctorwayne's suggestion. Forget about trying to use #80 drill bits. They are too fragile. Use #79s or #78s. The very slight increase in diameter increases the strength enormously, and the difference in the hole size will be filled by the CA quite nicely.

I would also second another suggestion made by Mike. That is to chuck the bits so that the length of the bit that is sticking out of the pin vise is barely longer than needed to get through the material being drilled. If the drill bit is sticking way out of the chuck that will allow it to flex, and when they flex they break.

Dave

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Thursday, August 22, 2019 5:48 AM

PC101
Well I thought everybody would have no less then ten #80 drill bits at there work bench.

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I actually bought 1,000 #78 drill bits from drillbitsunlimited about two years ago. I still have over 700 left, and I build A LOT of freight cars that need holes drilled.

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I am into "lifetime supply" purchases now. I am at an age now where a lifetime supply is smaller and more affordable.

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-Kevin

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Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by gregc on Thursday, August 22, 2019 5:52 AM

you might try MicroMark The Small Tools Specialists

greg - Philadelphia & Reading / Reading

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Posted by riogrande5761 on Thursday, August 22, 2019 6:07 AM

mbinsewi

My main hobby shop carries #80 bits from Walthers, 2 in a package, and they work good as far as I'm concerned.

I use a pin vise, leave only a little of the bit exposed, and take my time.

Mike.

Best answer.  ^

Rio Grande.  The Action Road  - Focus 1977-1983

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Posted by NVSRR on Thursday, August 22, 2019 8:33 AM

I second micromark.   They seam to have the sharper small bits.  

A pessimist sees a dark tunnel

An optimist sees the light at the end of the tunnel

A realist sees a frieght train

An engineer sees three idiots standing on the tracks stairing blankly in space

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Posted by Graham Line on Friday, August 23, 2019 12:50 PM

#80 bits and other small sizes last longer for me if I first run them into some hard beeswax or a bit of Dr Zog's surfboard wax. It reduces the tendency to grab in styrene.

Also helps to have a fixture to keep the drill and the work in alignment so you don't get any lateral pressure.  This is often easier said than done, however.

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Posted by Little Timmy on Friday, August 23, 2019 2:17 PM

After destroying several small bit's . I switched to makeing my own bit's  using Guitar string's. A single string will give you about 30 bit's. Just cut the desired length from the string ( I use a pair of rail nipper's) and cut the string at a 45 degree angle. 

This will work for plastic, wood, and other soft material..... not so good for drilling through Brass or Steel....... and yes, it can take your eye out !

Plus. Guitar string is kinda flexable, so it's very forgiving of "twitchy" hand movement's.

Rust...... It's a good thing !

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Friday, August 23, 2019 5:38 PM

Graham Line
Dr Zog's surfboard wax. It reduces the tendency to grab in styrene.

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My post was deleted. I guess because I called Mr. Zog's Wax by the actual retail trade name.

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Reposting my question...

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What color (temperature) of Zog's wax do you use? I have yellow, orange, red, green, and purple. I never thought of using it on a drill bit.

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-Kevin

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Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by Graham Line on Friday, August 23, 2019 9:32 PM

I use my special blend, meaning it's various lumps picked up on the beach and remelted to let the sand settle out.  And yes, you can't say 'wax' on the MR forum.

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Posted by rrebell on Saturday, August 24, 2019 10:37 AM

I have never had a problem with the cheap bits (they are ussually the same as the name brand). With the size you are using, you need real skills not to break them, use a bit bigger bit and avoid the heartbreak.

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Posted by mlehman on Saturday, August 24, 2019 10:45 AM

gregc

you might try MicroMark The Small Tools Specialists

 

I'll third that recommendation for Micro-Mark, good bits in quantity at a fair price.

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Sunday, August 25, 2019 8:04 PM

Graham Line
I use my special blend, meaning it's various lumps picked up on the beach and remelted to let the sand settle out.

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I can't tell if that answer was tounge-in-cheek or dead serious.

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I have a few half used cakes, and I think I have three new green cakes of Mr. Zog's <banned non-profane word> Wax leftover from my surfing attempts in the early 1990s.

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I could melt them all together.

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-Kevin

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Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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