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Just starting out, putting together a rolling stock roster, suggestions?

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Just starting out, putting together a rolling stock roster, suggestions?
Posted by Ethereal_Dragon on Thursday, April 18, 2019 11:44 AM

Hello everyone, 

 

I am just getting into the hobby (again), for the first time since my childhood (Tyco toys with horn-hook couplers). I don't have a layout, or plans for one at the moment as my kids are still very young, but I am waiting on a membership with a large local club to be finalized. I have made 2 trips to a local hobby shop just around the corner from my house and have purchased a few things. I have started a roster of my equipment for easy reference when I am there so I can make sure not to double up on road numbers (no need to manually renumber then) if possible. Or, to be able to identify what I had should something.... have a fall and sudden stop at some point. I have found that certain manufacturers (looking at YOU Walthers & Atlas) make it incredibly DIFFICULT to find info on anything that may be out of production, basically not possible to search their website for their own model numbers.

 

So far, this is what I have down, but I wanted to get feedback on this to see if others do this, and what other elements you might track. At this point, I don't have a proper scale to track weight, or an NMRA gauge to verify wheels or coupler heights, etc, maybe down the road. I know some of the things aren't needed such as DCC or sound for rolling stock, but I do know some people will put a sound decoder into a car for train noises, additional immersion and all of that.

Model Roadname Number Manufacturer Model Line Model # Wheelset Couplers Notes DC / DCC Sound Min Radius
SD40-2 Soo 763 Athearn Ready to Roll ATH16716 Metal McHenry scale knuckle spring couplers   DCC Econami 18"
SD40-2 Burlington Northern 8085 Athearn Ready to Roll ATH98374 Metal McHenry scale knuckle spring couplers   DCC Yes, no info  
                       
Model Roadname Number Manufacturer Model Line Model # Wheelset Couplers Notes DC / DCC Sound Min Radius
ACF 50.5' Boxcar Burlington Northern 249089 Atlas Trainman 20003888 Metal AccuMate Knuckle Couplers        
Evans Gondola Amtrak 13321 Atlas Trainman 20000246 Metal AccuMate Knuckle Couplers        
50' Coal Gondola CEPX 1226 Walthers Mainline 910-65704 Metal Proto MAX Metal Knuckle Couplers        
50' Coal Gondola CEPX 1267 Walthers Mainline 910-65704 Metal Proto MAX Metal Knuckle Couplers        
50' Coal Gondola CEPX 1314 Walthers Mainline 910-65704 Metal Proto MAX Metal Knuckle Couplers        
50' Coal Gondola CEPX 1349 Walthers Mainline 910-65704 Metal Proto MAX Metal Knuckle Couplers        
50' Coal Gondola CEPX 1385 Walthers Mainline 910-65704 Metal Proto MAX Metal Knuckle Couplers        
50' Coal Gondola CEPX 1418 Walthers Mainline 910-65704 Metal Proto MAX Metal Knuckle Couplers        

 

I am not sure how well that table may translate to the forum, just in case here is a brief example of a locomotive and car that I have tracked:

 

Model SD40-2
Roadname Soo
Number 763
Manufacturer Athearn
Model Line Ready to Roll
Model # ATH16716
Wheelset Metal
Couplers
McHenry scale knuckle spring couplers
Notes  
DC / DCC DCC
Sound Econami
Min Radius 18"
   
Model ACF 50.5' Boxcar
Roadname Burlington Northern
Number 249089
Manufacturer Atlas
Model Line Trainman
Model # 20003888
Wheelset Metal
Couplers
AccuMate Knuckle Couplers
Notes  
DC / DCC  
Sound  
Min Radius  
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Posted by IDRick on Thursday, April 18, 2019 4:13 PM

Welcome to the forum!  Very nice job on your list!  Some possible suggestions:

Which coupler?  Must use Kadees if planning to use magnetic uncoupling.

Car color?  Having a variety of colors is attractive, to me anyways...

 

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Posted by G Paine on Thursday, April 18, 2019 10:56 PM

A couple of things to think about when starting out is timeframe and location

What years are you considering? With a couple of SD40s, one being BN, I guess that you are doing the 70s(?). Railroads can run freight cars for 20 or 30 years unless they are in rough service, so cars with build dates going back into the 1950s would be suitable. 50s vintage cars would need to be updated to remove roofwalks. All cars would have consolidated lube panels, a black panel with white lettering. BN would have a lot of Plate C, 100 ton capacity cars - boxcars, grain service covered hoppers, etc. Dependng on location, you might even have some Amtrak passenger service

 

Because it was formed from mergers of a number of large RR, BN covers a lot of area in the upper midwest and northwest. Have you considered what part of this vast area you want to model? It will affect the industries you add to your layout and the scenery.

Please share this information with us, and it will help with our suggestions

WelcomeWelcomeWelcome

George In Midcoast Maine, 'bout halfway up the Rockland branch 

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Posted by SPSOT fan on Friday, April 19, 2019 12:35 AM

A very good idea, to start cataloguing your fleet of rolling stock early. I have tried to catalog my grandpa’s fleet of hundreds of cars, a result of years of uncataloged collecting, and it was hard and unsuccessful, next time I visited he had 30 more cars to add!

Learning from that I have already cataloged my collection of less than 20 pieces. You’ve got mostly the same thing I do. I also add location because my stuff is spread out in three places. Since you say you are joining a club this may be helpful to know what’s at the club and what’s at home. For wheel sets you may want to have the size (usually 33 or 36 scale inches) and manufacturer. I don’t do this but you may also want a description of the paint sceme on your engine/cars.

In the end add what you think is nessessary and add cars when you buy them, don’t let them pile up!

Regards, Isaac

I model my railroad and you model yours! I model my way and you model yours!

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Posted by "JaBear" on Friday, April 19, 2019 2:33 AM
I think your roster looks pretty good.  I have seperate rosters for the different types of cars, and I have three more columns, to include, New or 2nd hand, Modifications, and date of Last Inspection. I don’t go for the specific model number, and my notes column takes care of whether the car is RTR or a kit.
 
Don’t do what I have done by not filling the roster as I purchase new (to me) rolling stock, getting behind is a pain in the behind!Sigh
 
Cheers, the Bear.Smile

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Posted by SPSOT fan on Friday, April 19, 2019 4:00 AM

I think your roster looks pretty good.  I have seperate rosters for the different types of cars, and I have three more columns, to include, New or 2nd hand, Modifications, and date of Last Inspection. I don’t go for the specific model number, and my notes column takes care of whether the car is RTR or a kit.  

I also have different rosters for different car types.

I should add if they were new or second hand and RTR or Kit, good idea Bear!

I once included price payed at time of purchase, then realized this is a hobby and I don’t care what I paid, I know their approximate value anyway if the time comes to sell stuff.

Regards, Isaac

I model my railroad and you model yours! I model my way and you model yours!

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Posted by dstarr on Friday, April 19, 2019 6:45 AM

I do a roster like that myself.  I use Excel.  In addition to what you have, I have columns for build date (the date I built the kit or checked out or fixed up the train show purchase), price I paid, length of car in scale feet (useful for keeping track of boxcars) car weight, and a details column for general comments.

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Posted by mbinsewi on Friday, April 19, 2019 7:00 AM

Welcome to the MR forums.  Big Smile

Now you'll hear from someone who has never cataloged rolling stock, or kept any such records of locomotives, as I don't feel the need.  But that's my way, and it works for me.

You do it your way. Smile, Wink & Grin   I never found the need, or the desire, for all the documentation.  Most of my roster is equipment I have bought used over the years, to suit my needs, refurbished, detailed, and rebuilt, and sometimes repurposed.  Locomotives, and rolling stock.

As far as Walthers goes, have you tried the Advanced search?  I have, and do, and have a fair amount of success.

At the bottom of the long list of items, are some boxes.  Make sure you check the box about discountinued items, most times, that will help, you might not always get an image.

A Google search will sometimes give results, sorta the "back door" approach, but it can be productive.

A site that can be of help with finding diagrams of older equipment is:

https://hoseeker.net/lit.html

Good luck with your start in model railroading! and for posting pictures, at the top of the General Discussion forum is a "sticky" on how to do it, and the requirments.

Mike.

 

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Posted by SPSOT fan on Friday, April 19, 2019 7:50 AM

dstarr

I do a roster like that myself.  I use Excel.  In addition to what you have, I have columns for build date (the date I built the kit or checked out or fixed up the train show purchase), price I paid, length of car in scale feet (useful for keeping track of boxcars) car weight, and a details column for general comments.

The scale length of the car is a very usefup item to include. I usually put this in my “car type” i.e. a 40’ boxcar or a 50’ covered gondola. Is you decide to use a computer program (i.e. JMRI) to route cars you will need to know this to tell the computer so it doesn’t put more cars on a track than can fit.

Car weight is also very useful. Generally cars track best at or above NMRA recommended weight, so you’ll want to have a record of what cars are at that.

Regards, Isaac

I model my railroad and you model yours! I model my way and you model yours!

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Posted by Ethereal_Dragon on Friday, April 19, 2019 8:02 AM

Thank you all for the kind words!!

For Prototype, I don't really have anything set, I just buy what I like and plan to run that. PERSONALLY, the current generation locomotives are cool and all, but I just dont dig the cabs. They all look like identical twins. The only way I know to tell them apart is the radiators, or the printing under the cab window, but I can't remember models, I can only differentiate between them. I LOVE steam (bit expensive for me at this point), and I LOVE early generation diesels. I also love the locomotives I used to see with my dad as a kid when we would drive by the railyards and watch trains for a few minutes (a tradition I have with my kids now). They love the hobby shop too. My daughter picked out the BN boxcar and Amtrak Gondola last time we were there. 

 

I use Googles version of Excel saved to my Google drive for the roster at the moment. I am seeing lots of good suggestions. I plan to note wheel size and Mfr, but not sure how without an NMRA gauge. Also, if anyone has tips in identifying wheel mfr based upon model mfr I would appreciate it. 

 

The ideas for Color scheme, last maintenance, weight, and the like are good additions. I may add a column for weathering info as well should I start down that path. 

 

With the club, they have no specific prototype. I would say the layout itself is 50s to 80s, with members having every interest imaginable. My most recent visit I was watching a modern CSX consist, some other fairly modern freights, a Wabash E unit (I think) passenger train, several steam trains, and a dual UP Turbine pulling over 80 old reefers. The time before that there was a member with 2 different bullet trains (series 0 and series 5) and a Japenese freight loco of some kind. Before that was a member with several British steam engines. It is pretty awesome to see something different EVERY time I am there. 

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Posted by emdmike on Friday, April 19, 2019 9:51 AM

One of the cheapest and absolutly best running first generation diesels are the yellow box engines from Atlas with the Kato drive in them.  This is where Kato got thier start in the USA.  You can chose from the Alco C425/424, RS3, RS1, RSD 4/5, RSD12, RS11 and the GP7/9(with/without dynamics).  They are butter smooth running, excellent headlights even in DC mode and drop in sound decoders are out there for them if you go the DCC route.  I am seeing these engines $45 and under at most train shows if you shop around.  For long trains the GP7s are best with thier diecast metal chassis/walkways, same for the RS1.  The others have a plastic walkway/pilot assembly and it can flex under heavy loads causing uncoupling.    I would recommend finding some kind of prototype to follow, be it a shortline using hand me down first generation diesels or a certain area of say the BN or ATSF.   Otherwise you end up with a "shotgun" approach, this leads to having lots of stuff but no real focus.  I have done this a few times and its not the best approach to modeling. 

Personally, I have settled on a shortline using ex-BN first gen diesels.  The line is set in IL or IN.  I am using the local shortline like it was in the late 80's/early 1990's as my inspiration.  This was what I was exposed to and first railfanned on bicycle(as well as in the cab many times) as a teenager before I got my first car. And even then, it was my choice to railfan(bicycle was cheaper than gas in the car!).  I am using Overland brass diesels for motive power.  I started where you are, and now I strive for a couple really really nice locomotives instead of a fleet of them.  Rolling stock is a mix of grain hoppers that I remember seeing where I lived back then, NS, NW, ADM, Stailey and a few odd balls from out west like Lincoln Grain, and so forth.  Most are older Athearn blue box kits and Accurail kits as I refuse to pay nearly $30 for a single RTR grain hopper.  I use Kaydee couplers only, along with thier magnetic uncoupling feature(makes switching and making set outs really enjoyable and nearly hands off operation).

Whatever you do, as long as your having fun and destressing while enjoying your trains, that is what is most important.  Rule #1= its your railroad, Rule #2= when in doubt, refer back to rule #1.        Good Luck!       Mike the Aspie

Silly NT's, I have Asperger's Syndrome

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Posted by kasskaboose on Friday, April 19, 2019 10:01 AM

Put me in pls for one who never made a rolling stock inventory.  I don't see the purpose.  Is it to avoid getting duplicate cars? I once did that and alterated on of the numbers on the car by a digit or two.  It looked quite realistic.

Whatever works for you.  I find it a waste for now.  Perhaps when I have a fleet of hundreds. 

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Posted by mbinsewi on Friday, April 19, 2019 10:38 AM

emdmike
One of the cheapest and absolutly best running first generation diesels are the yellow box engines from Atlas with the Kato drive in them. 

I have a few those too, Mike.  Just look for "Made in Japan" on the box, and on the bottom of the truck covers.  Those will have the Kato drive.

Mike.

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Posted by SPSOT fan on Friday, April 19, 2019 1:01 PM

Ethereal_Dragon

I use Googles version of Excel saved to my Google drive for the roster at the moment. I am seeing lots of good suggestions. I plan to note wheel size and Mfr, but not sure how without an NMRA gauge. Also, if anyone has tips in identifying wheel mfr based upon model mfr I would appreciate it. 

I also use Google Sheets for my roster, it’s easier ‘cause I can access it on any computer.

As for finding wheel size a pair of digital calipers may be usefull, take the number it reads and multiply it by 87.1 (for HO, 160 for N, etc). Alternately if you replace wheels you will know because it will say on the packag (hopefully). Do be aware the size of wheels is based on what the prototype had, don’t put the wrong size on the wrong car.

As for manufacture of the wheels I would assume the same company makes the wheels as makes the car, unless you changed the wheels in which case you should know who made the wheels. Perhaps more important than mfr is what the wheels are made of, are the wheels plastic/metal and are the axles plastic/metal, how big are the flanges, etc. (Note metal wheels are generally better quality than plastic ones)

Regards, Isaac

I model my railroad and you model yours! I model my way and you model yours!

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Posted by FRRYKid on Tuesday, April 23, 2019 12:55 AM

As for your mention of needing a scale for weight as well as the calipers, take a look at Harbor Freight. That's where Dad got me both my digital scale and my digital calipers. The other thing to look at would be getting a couple of sets of numbered drill bits (1-60) and (61-80). You will find that you will use them quite a bit. The 1-60 set also came from Harbor Freight. The other set came via the Internet.

I have about 170 pieces of rolling stock and I don't have them in a tracking program either. I just have a very good idea of the cars that I have.

I do have multiples of some cars as I need them for trains. As already mentioned renumbering is not hard once you get the hang of it. I also have painted and decaled about half of the equipment that I have. (I protolance so that is a prerequisite.)

I have equipment that has been kitbashed. I have a bunch of engines that use the shells from one manufacturer and bashed to fit a better drive. (Eight Tythearn engines and one Bachthearn.) I have eight Tyco cabooses that have been converted to run on Athearn caboose trucks. A Bachmann caboose is part of the collection as it is the only plastic model of that prototype.  A bashed Con-cor passenger dome-observation is also in my collection. (The rear truck mount has been moved forward to accomodate a new pair of Athearn streamline trucks.) That just shows you shouldn't eliminate less expensive cars just because of the name.

"The only stupid question is the unasked question."
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Posted by riogrande5761 on Tuesday, April 23, 2019 6:04 AM

 

Suggestions?

To the OP, if you haven't settled on a RR, an era or a theme, it's difficult to recommend rolling stock for your roster, unless you are looking for brand/make recommendations.  Just buy what is "shiny" and appeals to you.  Most have no trouble doing that.

As for brand, most of the following are good rolling stock: Athearn, Atlas, Walthers, Intermountain, ExactRail, etc.  Bachman is at the lower end but may work for you.

As for out of stock items.  Once you familiarize yourself with sources you will be able to find a lot of out of stock items.  Obviously Ebay is a very good source for that - I scavange Ebay regularly for out of stock items and hunt for reasonable priceds and have not trouble.  Trains shows are another source.  And there are some shops that seem to have stuff still in stock that others sell out of quickly.  So search vendors that have items. 

It takes time but after a few years you'll have a "go-to" list.  Spring Creek is one vendor in NE that I often find has items that many are out of but they don't have a live inventory like some do, so you may need to contact them if you are looking for certain items. The friendly staff will let you know if they have x, y or z.

kasskaboose

Put me in pls for one who never made a rolling stock inventory.  I don't see the purpose.  Is it to avoid getting duplicate cars? I once did that and alterated on of the numbers on the car by a digit or two.  It looked quite realistic.

Whatever works for you.  I find it a waste for now.  Perhaps when I have a fleet of hundreds. 

Hah hah.  Give it time.  I haven't counted my rolling stock but I'm sure it's in the hundreds - probably a couple hundred coal cars alone, but the D&RGW was a coal hauling road.

I haven't made an inventory either, nor an Excel spread sheet.  I simply don't have time for such an "excercise" when other more important things are needful.  I'm frequently buying and selling so it would be a lot of extra time to keep up-to-date and frankly sounds too much like work!

That said, I have a good mental inventory.  The only time it does matter, and I usually just spot check, is I don't want duplicate numbers.  Changing numbers on a car means I have to hunt down decals that match and my "to-do" list for the hobby is long enough, so I don't care to add on to it unnecessarily.  No thank you.  Anything that can keep my to-do list from getting longer is a plus!

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Posted by mbinsewi on Tuesday, April 23, 2019 7:35 AM

Ethereal_Dragon
"Just starting out, putting together a rolling stock roster, suggestions?".

It is hard to offer suggestions, as it seems the OP wants more info on detailed recording keeping, and not building a lay out.

Going by his "roster list" so far, he's in the mid to late 90's, but with the BN and ATSF merger in 96, he's kind of on a tight rope, as from his period on forward, his BN locos would be patched for the BNSF.

I'm sure plenty of BN locos roamed the road with out a "patch",  they will be getting fewer and fewer.

The same with his Soo Line.  Probably easier with the Soo, as many of these still excist in the red and white, well, what used to be red and white. Smile, Wink & Grin

His Cajun Electric Power Co.'s gondolas, (Trinity Industrial Leasing) CEPX, seem to fit the late 90's as well.

So, I guess until he has his answers on the different programs for his version of a detail record keeping program, and starts to move forward, solidifying his time period, specific railroad, and location, it's hard to offer help.

I would think the content of his roster would weigh over the record keeping of that content.  How can you build a roster with out knowing when and where?

And to save himself from buying items that don't fit his current scenario, it's even more important to get the "when and where" down first.

Ethereal_Dragon
I know some of the things aren't needed such as DCC or sound for rolling stock,

Definitlely not needed, maybe at some point down the road.

Ethereal_Dragon
I don't have a proper scale to track weight, or an NMRA gauge to verify wheels or coupler heights, etc

Important to have, once you actually have a lay out, and a lot of reading is available at NMRA, to help.

So once the OP has a "when and where" nailed down, I wish him success on his quest for record keeping.

I just can't imagine deciding I want to build a lay out, and NOT starting out by buying some track, and running the first loco I could get my hands on! Stick out tongue

Mike.

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Posted by riogrande5761 on Tuesday, April 23, 2019 8:57 AM
Ethereal_Dragon

 

I know some of the things aren't needed such as DCC or sound for rolling stock,

 

If you plan to run more than one train and plan to not go DCC, you will need to wire your track in blocks and control the trains by selecting the blocks the throttle will be controlling.  In coloquial terms, they call it running the track and not the trains.  Just an FYI.

If you choose DCC, you can basically dispense with the blocking of tracks for control purposes and instead, all the rails are powered all the time; in a nutshell.

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Posted by Ethereal_Dragon on Tuesday, April 23, 2019 10:39 AM

Thank you everyone for all of the responses with this topic. I should apologize in advance, as the discussion name could have been better (should have been cataloguing), and I could have elaborated more in my initial post. Or maybe it is that my post is being skimmed over without being read. 

 

Regarding the roster, I am speaking specifically to the TRACKING of the data of the equipment, not so much looking for suggestions on what rollingstock to buy specifically to fit a prototype to model. Personally, at this point in time, I want to build a small diorama to test out modeling techniques and things like that. I would LOVE to be able to build a layout, but I just don't have space with the current house layout, not that I don't WANT to build one. The only space I have which COULD be allocated to a layout, would be in a portion of the basement as wide as my home, which is currently ENTIRELY a childrens playroom. This means it would be left un-supervised with my 2 kids (both under 8), as well as neices and nephews (which we have 11, all of them under 12). It would be fantastic to be present down there at ALL TIMES when they are down there, but when only 1 parent is at home cooking dinner, or working from home, it just isn't feasible. So there is that. The other thing, is that I have a LOT of improvement in the space of carpentry, and being creative that I would like to work on BEFORE making a large investment in lumber and materials to eliminate the need for rework and wasted materials. Going along with this, without a layout, or the pontential of a layout in the near future, maybe I will choose a prototype and stick with i, and fill a roster with equipment that fits that prototype, but I haven't reached that point yet. Another consideration is that I have several large projects in and around the house which are demanding my time and resources (building joists up in attic to add another 6" of insulation, then 1st floor cieling tearout to put insulation in), several large parties we are planning and have dozens of hours of work needed outside the house to get prepared for, etc. etc. etc. it never stops. It isn't that I don't WANT to run trains, it is that I am joining a club for the time being the satisfy that want, with a tiny investment. 

 

With this digital roster, I am wanting to track details about my equipment, which will help me to remember what pieces are mine should they travel with me somewhere and someone has similar pieces, or if some of them stay at the model railroad club, etc. Also, I am hoping to keep tabs on derailments and issues seen which I can then use to visit later to investigate when I have time and see if I can correct the issues. As noted, it can also help to get cars with varying numbers, which I AM aware that they can be altered, but if I want to say get another set of 6 Walthers coal cars, there were a few boxes with different numbers on them, it would just be easier to get the ones that need no work. This can also help wih car routing in the future when I get to a layout, making waybills and setting ot cars and whatnot for pickup and drop off without having to double check ON the cars themselves. 

 

My PLAN for a layout, is to have it FULL DCC, no DC at all, and something that can be operated, focusing on switching, like a shelf layout most likely. The club I am joining has a layout which is a DC layout which DCC was incorporated onto, and is run in blocks. I am no sure how it operates yet, but am expecting my acceptance version in the next few days, with new member training HOPEFULLY Sunday, fingers crossed. Along with the topic of DCC, my initial post mentioning not sure if DCC is needed, was referring to tracking of DCC & Sound features on rollingstock themselves, not locomotives. I will likely repurpose those fields for the cars at some point, as I can't imagine sound & DCC cars would be used often if at all. 

 

There have been a lot of good suggestions with additions to the catalogue, and I can FULLY understand those that don't have time or a want or need to do this. At this time, I sit here with 9" and 12" and some curved track sections from when I was a kid, and no DC or DCC throttle with which to run my new DCC or the DC stuff from when I was a kid, so it amounts to trains siting on a folding table on static display, but currently carefully packed away in their boxes waiting to visit the railroad club. This is literally about the only thing I can do at this point, aside from research on modeling tips and things like that, as mentioned above wih wanting to hone my skills before jumping into my own layout. I am REALLY bad with prematurely jumping into something without planning, getting a LOT of time spent working on something and then stepping back and wanting to tear everything out and start over. I would like to carefully and methodically plan something that I can see through to completion and be happy with for years to come, and interest my kids as well. 

 

Someone did mention a digital caliper, and I actually DO have one that I got from my father in law recently, and never thought to use that to verify dimensions of wheel sets with that as opposed to an NMRA standards gauge. I will have to check my toolbox to see where that is at. 

 

Again, I really do appreciate the information that has been provided here. I am a pretty young guy (30s), and god willing have a LONG time left to get to a layout. (If a grand parent is any indication, 3 of them lived into their late 80s before passing, and I have 1 still with us that will be 100 this year. 

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Posted by mbinsewi on Tuesday, April 23, 2019 10:58 AM

Ethereal_Dragon
discussion name could have been better (should have been cataloguing)

I read that from the beginning, but, somehow, as things do in here, it drifted on to the actuall equipment, etc., etc.

Your not alone in this forum as far as being anal with the tracking, cataloging, documentation, spreed sheets, analysing, and such.  You have company in here, and maybe if the thread was titled with things, as you suggest, what programs do you use, what do you document, etc., you'll get some of your fellow "Bookkeepers" to respond.

There was a thread started in here not that long ago, on this same topic.

Good luck with it all!  

Oh, and congrats to your grandparent that's 100 !  Big Smile

I'm just a young buck at 70.  Mischief

Mike.

  • Member since
    October, 2008
  • From: Canada
  • 1,125 posts
Posted by cv_acr on Wednesday, April 24, 2019 9:16 AM

G Paine

Railroads can run freight cars for 20 or 30 years unless they are in rough service, 

 

40 years for cars built before July 1974; 50 years for cars built after July 1974.

Extensions can be granted for extensive rebuilds or specific waivers (a lot of TTX autorack flatcars are certified for 65-year extended service life).

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