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Wooden kit: what glue to use?

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Wooden kit: what glue to use?
Posted by MrMick on Thursday, February 14, 2019 11:57 AM

I picked up a Timberline wood kit of a small shed, and I am wondering what glue to use - Duco? White glue? Flour and water? etc.  As a kid I used Ambroid cement, but I haven't seen any of that stuff around for a while.  Suggestions would be approciated.  Thanks

Tags: Glue , wood kit
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Posted by j. c. on Thursday, February 14, 2019 11:59 AM

for wood i used tight bond .

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Posted by IRONROOSTER on Thursday, February 14, 2019 12:01 PM

Lately, I have been using Titebond Original for wood kits. 

Paul

If you're having fun, you're doing it the right way.
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Posted by Jumijo on Thursday, February 14, 2019 2:00 PM

Wood glue?

Modeling the Baltimore waterfront in HO scale

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Thursday, February 14, 2019 2:12 PM

A thin layer of Titebond Wood Glue is what I use.

.

-Kevin

.

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by gshin on Thursday, February 14, 2019 2:33 PM

I use yellow wood glue.

Greg Shindledecker Modeling the =WM= Thomas Sub in the mid-70s
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Posted by MrMick on Thursday, February 14, 2019 3:36 PM

Titebond seems to be thepeoples choice; thanks

 

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Posted by gregc on Friday, February 15, 2019 5:37 AM

CA for immediate bonds, no need to wait.

CA glue became the glue of choice in model airplane construction, for these reasons.   With the wood held in position, the thin CA quickly wicks into the wood across the gap between pieces.

one problem is controlling the amount of glue, you'll need less than a drop.   There are glue applicator tips for this reason.

to gain experience, try using CA on internal structures.

but if you plan on staining (e.g. indian ink), you need to stain the wood before you glue them.

if not CA, i agree with the others using a carpenters glue.  I use tightbond.

greg - Philadelphia & Reading / Reading

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Posted by richhotrain on Friday, February 15, 2019 6:04 AM

SeeYou190

A thin layer of Titebond Wood Glue is what I use..

-Kevin 

Agreed. Really, is there anything else? Titebond Yellow Wood Glue is your friend when it comes to wood structures.

Rich

Alton Junction

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Posted by zstripe on Friday, February 15, 2019 6:23 AM

I have had excellent results with Northeastern Flamingo Glue. Sets in 5 minutes drys shortly after. Extremely strong. I use it on anything wood and mat board together.

This back porch was built with Northeastern strip scale wood and their glue: Ca was used for the styrene parts:

My scratch built overpass parts consisting of illustration board and white pine wood was put together with the Northeastern glue:

It was also built to be removeable.

These bridge pier bumpers made out of wood dowels was also held together with Northeastern wood glue. I like it mainly because it is fast and very strong:

The bumpers were made to protect the bridge main piers from damage:

Take Care!

Frank

 

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Posted by gregc on Friday, February 15, 2019 7:45 AM

zstripe
Ca was used for the styrene parts:

why not use MEK or a MEK based glue for styrene.

greg - Philadelphia & Reading / Reading

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Posted by zstripe on Friday, February 15, 2019 8:39 AM

gregc

 

 
zstripe
Ca was used for the styrene parts:

 

why not use MEK or a MEK based glue for styrene.

 

Simply because it had to be glued to the rest of the wood porch......unfortunately, MEK does not work on wood. I used Zap A Gap Medium CA.

If You click on the pic'(it will give a larger view) you'll see the green floor, white railing and Grey stairs are styrene on the porch.

Take Care! Big Smile

Frank

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Posted by dstarr on Friday, February 15, 2019 9:03 AM

For wood-to-wood bonds, I use the Poly Vinyl Acetate (PVA) glues, Elmers, Titebond, white or yellow. Used on a long grain to long grain joint they can give a bond stronger than the original wood.  For model work, the white is about as good as the yellow carpenter's versions like Titebond.  They dry enough to handle in maybe 20 minutes, but it takes overnight to reach full strength.  They need to be clamped, but for joints requiring real strength, say gluing the end blocks to the roof and floor of rolling stock, they do a fine job. 

   For attaching trim pieces and other joints that don't get much stress, cellulose cement,  Duco, Ambroid, and others, works well and dries in minutes,

I haven't used CA for wood modeling, but CA sticks to nearly anything, and dries in flash. 

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Posted by RR_Mel on Friday, February 15, 2019 9:16 AM

My wife introduced me to crafters Aleene’s Wood Glue many years ago and for my wood scratch building it works very good.  It sets up quickly and when dry is very strong.  With pressure the glue never lets go the wood always breaks.  It dries to a light brown and will accept wood stains.
 
It is my goto for wooden hobby projects.
 
 
 
Mel
 
 
My Model Railroad   
 
Bakersfield, California
 
I'm beginning to realize that aging is not for wimps.
 
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Posted by sfcouple on Friday, February 15, 2019 6:27 PM

I've been using Titebond and Northeastern Flamingo for years with great success. 

Wayne

Modeling HO Freelance Logging Railroad.

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Posted by BN7150 on Friday, February 15, 2019 10:44 PM

Twenty years ago I assembled La Belle's O scale wooden box car kits with white glue.

An accident occurred in the task of sticking an exterior thin plate to the surface of the thick coreboard. After applying the bond to the thin plate and pressing it on the core, after a while, the edge of the thin plate warped and peeled off. There was also a phenomenon in which the boards on both sides pushed together and bounced up in the part where they were stuck. Thin wood boards absorb moisture and stretch. So I used Wood-CA only for this work.

La Belle

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Posted by Howard Zane on Saturday, February 16, 2019 1:02 PM

I have always used Goo, now marketed by Walthers. I love the fudge factor, meaning that what you attached may be relocated or removed later on. It can be diluted with lacquer thinner and applied with a tooth pick, or with practice...just use tube.

It also works quite well as a contact glue.....just glue one side, attach to other, remove and reattach 30 seconds later for a firm bond. It still may be adusted later on. Goo is available in most hobby shops. Years back just after Walthers took over Goo from Hobsco, I for the fun of it  squeezed both tubes ...Hobsco and the new Walthers on a piece af paper......Guess which tube had more.

Howard Zane
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Posted by robert sylvester on Thursday, February 28, 2019 11:55 AM

YeahSmile, Wink & Grin Howard, yes I used Hobsco then Goo. Then dad introduced me to contact cement, this was way back, (I think trains were still in developement), anyway I used that for years, then model glue, then CA and somehow I forgot about contact cement until Dr. Wayne mentioned it again not to long ago. So off I went and found it at one of the big box stores.

101-2632.jpg

I used it to make my home made telephone poles. What I like about it is the almost instant stick and adhesion you get with contact cement and it sets up fairly quickly. I use it for a lots things, even placing the diaphragms on my brass cars.

Robert Sylvester

Newberry-Columbia Line, SC

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Posted by robert sylvester on Thursday, February 28, 2019 11:58 AM

YeahSmile, Wink & Grin Howard, yes I used Hobsco then Goo. Then dad introduced me to contact cement, this was way back, (I think trains were still in developement), anyway I used that for years, then model glue, then CA and somehow I forgot about contact cement until Dr. Wayne mentioned it again not to long ago. So off I went and found it at one of the big box stores.

101-2602.jpg

101-2708.jpg

101-2697.jpg

 

I used it to make my home made telephone poles. What I like about it is the almost instant stick and adhesion you get with contact cement and it sets up fairly quickly. I use it for a lots things, even placing the diaphragms on my brass cars.

Robert Sylvester

Newberry-Columbia Line, SC

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Posted by thatweirdwriterdude on Friday, April 26, 2019 11:57 AM
any type of superglue will work, but just be aware of the fumes though, superglue is what i use, just some from a local craft store, not any specific brand
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Posted by trainnut1250 on Saturday, April 27, 2019 2:16 AM

I build lots of models for the layout with wood.

One thing to keep in mind is that white glue can be wetted after it is dry and it will soften. A part can be repositioned or removed easily. Not true with yellow wood glue. It is water proof. 

Yellow glue grabs better than white glue. White glue dries with a Matt finish while many yellow glues dry with a shiny finish (moral here is to be neat with the yellow glue).

Aileen's has good initial grab and will remain slightly flexible when dry - a nice feature in certain circumstances. I find it dries out very quickly in my glue cup. 

I use CA for everything but rarely for wood to wood as I like to have some time move items or to place them. CA can seep onto places it shouldn't and glue items to my work surface - making them difficult to remove. This makes it problematic when freehanding on glass over a line drawing or when gluing in fixtures.

I usually use yellow glue but one of the best builders I know uses white glue for all of his numerous wood models.

Too much from me,

 

Guy

see stuff at: the Willoughby Line Site

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Posted by Marc_Magnus on Saturday, April 27, 2019 2:57 AM

I build a lot of laser kit in wood for my N scale layout.

If wood glue are great, the drying time is too long for me.

I use a lot of CA gel to build the model and  accelerator if needed.

Gel because you have time to adjust the small pieces together.

I also use regular CA because it goes in any spot quiet easily.

The bond between wood and CA is extremly strong.

I often mix plastic parts with wood parts and CA again do the job.

I use a professionnal rate CA gel and glue made by Loctite.

As often mentionned wood kit are time consumming but the use of CA allow you to build quiet quickly a wood craftsman kit.

Well know modelers Dave Frary and Georges Sellios mentionned both the major use of CA in their wood kit construction.

And a tips for the self adhesive window often offered in modern laser kit, I put them in place with the self adhesive , but I retouch the whole assembly when in place with diluted matte medium with a fine brush; the matte flow between all the self adhesive parts ( tiny in N scale) and the bond is extremly strong on wood and invisible.

These  N scale models are all CA bonded and use the matte for the frame of the windows frame.

These models where all glued with CA; the big blue company is now nearly ten years old.

 

 

 

 

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Posted by rrebell on Sunday, April 28, 2019 7:23 AM

I use Pace gel CA. Started using in many years ago (20+) and found it has held up well over the years. Had a mostly built stamp mill and it was on a top shelf, we had a 4 leged guest apear which knocked it to the floor from about 8 ft' up, it just bounced.

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