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Flipping Train coffee table(different from all the others)

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Flipping Train coffee table(different from all the others)
Posted by Waldraff on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 7:24 AM

Check out my n scale Train coffee table I built over the last year, It is much different than most tables you have seen! Let me know what you think of my idea for the table and the layout itself.  

Thanks , Pete

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=24vvFtsCFRM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeDsFoG0ka0

 

Thanks, Pete

 

 

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Posted by mbinsewi on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 10:22 AM

That is really cool Pete!  Excellent job.  After watching the first video, I didn't think that tall mountain, with trees was going fit, then I watched the second video.

Excellent job!

Looks like you have a lot of nice wood working tools, and you know how to use them.  Obviously not your first project!

Mike.

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Posted by dknelson on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 10:28 AM

That's great.  And a really nice looking piece of furniture regardless of layout.  In some ways the slat idea is almost like the old fashioned railroad water tanks. 

The crabby geezer in me however does warn that in some of the shots involving power tools you were not using eye protection.    

Dave Nelson

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 11:48 AM

Welcome to the Model Railroader forums. Your first few posts are delayed by the site moderators, but that will com to an end soon enough.

.

Please stick around.

.

You are right... that layout is different from any other coffee table layout that I have seen before.

.

Well done. It looks great.

.

-Kevin

.

Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

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Posted by hon30critter on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 11:55 AM

Hi Pete!

Welcome to the forums!!          Welcome

Your coffee table layout is really amazing, and you are right - it is different. I can just imagine the look on peoples' faces when you flip the top over.

Dave

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Posted by Waldraff on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 6:12 PM
Thanks! l loved building this project and have a few other train layout ideas. I'm Still learning about the train stuff, but yes woodworking is my main hobby.
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Posted by Waldraff on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 6:54 PM

Thanks, hat was my first criteria in building the table, it had to be a good looking piece. About the slats,I wish that was the reason I built it that way, but I never thought of that about the slats that way. That is cool! 

You are completely right about the eyes, I have a bad habit of forgetting to put them on, and during the winter months they fog up on me, even more dangerous. I need to figure out how to prevent the fog.

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Posted by Waldraff on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 6:57 PM
Thanks, appreciate it. yeah I was wondering about the delay.
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Posted by Waldraff on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 6:59 PM
Thanks, its usually a very surprised look.
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Posted by Hillyard on Saturday, January 19, 2019 12:11 PM

Pete,

Very creative & well executed.  I see in the video you have a lot of power tools, so I suppose woodworking is something you enjoy very much.

That being said in the most positive way I can imagine, I cringed when I saw you pushing boards through the table saw using only your hand.  I know a person whose career path changed after cutting off his fingers with a power saw.

You might want to consider using a push stick.

--Doug in Salem.

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Posted by ROBERT PETRICK on Saturday, January 19, 2019 12:42 PM

Waldraff

Check out my n scale Train coffee table I built over the last year, It is much different than most tables you have seen! Let me know what you think of my idea for the table and the layout itself.  

Thanks , Pete

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=24vvFtsCFRM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeDsFoG0ka0

Thanks, Pete

Hey Pete-

Nice work. Tidy shop, too.

It looks like the outermost lower ring has what modelers here would call a staging/storage track. How does the train transition from storage to display and back again? It appears to be hidden from the camera. Is there a lot of fidgeting and hand work (what modelers here would call the 0-5-0) involved?

Thanks.

Robert 

LINK to SNSR Blog


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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Saturday, January 19, 2019 12:57 PM

Pete, very nice work.

This thread has taught me one important lesson, I will not be posting any videos of my upcoming layout construction........

I work with tools most everyday, for most of 45 years now, I am 61. I do carpentry, plumbing, electrical and more. I have built houses, restored (not renovated) ones over 100 years old, and done every sort of renovation. I also have extensive experiance working on/restoring autos.

I still have all my fingers, toes, eyes, etc.....

My humble opinion, there are times for specific safety gear, and times when the safety gear IS the hazard.

In Pete's videos, one time he is pushing a wide piece of material thru the table saw, another time a very small piece. I would NEVER use a push stick on that large piece, and I would ALWAYS use a push stick on the small piece.

Eye protection is great, as long as it does not restrict your vision.........

Safety gear will never replace care and common sense, and I have seen safety gear cause injury, by restricting movement or vision.

I should stop right here..........

Sheldon

PS - I might also mention much of my electrical and plumbing experiance when I was younger was in industrial/commercial construction, not just residential work......so I know all about "safety gear"..........

    

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Posted by tstage on Saturday, January 19, 2019 1:50 PM

Hi Pete,

What a nice construction project!  A FWIW: The "Add Quote to your Post" feature is a nice way to respond to specific posts or posters.  That way it's clear who you are responding to.  Again, FWIW...

Tom

http://www.newyorkcentralmodeling.com

Time...It marches on...without ever turning around to see if anyone is even keeping in step.

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Posted by Waldraff on Saturday, January 19, 2019 2:59 PM

Hillyard

Pete,

Very creative & well executed.  I see in the video you have a lot of power tools, so I suppose woodworking is something you enjoy very much.

That being said in the most positive way I can imagine, I cringed when I saw you pushing boards through the table saw using only your hand.  I know a person whose career path changed after cutting off his fingers with a power saw.

You might want to consider using a push stick.

--Doug in Salem.

Hi Doug, I don't usually use a push stick unless the piece I'm ripping is less than an 1.5", I feel like a push stick gives me less control. Those slats were on the border though. That being said, you are right, I should use a push stick more often. I did see a tool in a video that looks like a trowel which holds the piece down and pushes. I think I will buy one of those.

I am very careful but you never can be too careful, and that is why I just today upgraded my 22 year old dewalt for a Saw stop. But I dont want to test it so I will start using a push stick more often. I also need to where saftey glasses more often, but the darn things always fog up.

Thanks for the concern, I do appreciate it.

Thanks

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Posted by Waldraff on Saturday, January 19, 2019 3:25 PM

ROBERT PETRICK

 

 
Waldraff

Check out my n scale Train coffee table I built over the last year, It is much different than most tables you have seen! Let me know what you think of my idea for the table and the layout itself.  

Thanks , Pete

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=24vvFtsCFRM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeDsFoG0ka0

Thanks, Pete

 

 

Hey Pete-

Nice work. Tidy shop, too.

It looks like the outermost lower ring has what modelers here would call a staging/storage track. How does the train transition from storage to display and back again? It appears to be hidden from the camera. Is there a lot of fidgeting and hand work (what modelers here would call the 0-5-0) involved?

Thanks.

Robert 

 

Robert, you are correct the train is stored on the outer lower ring. I do plan on making another video showing more detail on how the table works. The train never needs to be removed and placed back on the track. The train is always on that loop until the table is flipped. It will run on that loop until I flip a momentary toggle switch, this throws two turnouts to allow the train to travel from the bottom to the top by way of the helix(I call spur line). When I see the train at the top then I can switch back to the mainline. The controls are hidden in the mountain on left side of the waterfall below the tunnel. 

Not sure what you mean by fidgeting and handwork, if you mean is it a smooth transition crossing the gap between the outer ring and inner circle, Yes. I have only had one derailment in a year. There is a very slight bump but does not seem to effect the cars from staying on the track, I have a rerailer on the other side after it crosses over just as insurance. I am not really familar with all the terminology but would like to learn.

Hope I answered your question, thanks. 

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Posted by mbinsewi on Saturday, January 19, 2019 3:30 PM

Waldraff
Not sure what you mean by fidgeting and handwork,

Not to butt in on Robert, but I think he, as I, wondered how the train is staged, and how it gets to the layout, and does it include picking up the train, one car at a time, and putting it back together again on the layout.

It seems like you have this all worked out, even with the helix!  Yes, we'd love to see the details!

Mike.

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Posted by Waldraff on Saturday, January 19, 2019 3:34 PM

tstage

Hi Pete,

What a nice construction project!  A FWIW: The "Add Quote to your Post" feature is a nice way to respond to specific posts or posters.  That way it's clear who you are responding to.  Again, FWIW...

Tom

 

Tom,

Thanks for the tip, I was wondering about that. This is the first time I have joined a discussion site like this.  

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Posted by Waldraff on Saturday, January 19, 2019 3:40 PM

ATLANTIC CENTRAL

Pete, very nice work.

This thread has taught me one important lesson, I will not be posting any videos of my upcoming layout construction........

I work with tools most everyday, for most of 45 years now, I am 61. I do carpentry, plumbing, electrical and more. I have built houses, restored (not renovated) ones over 100 years old, and done every sort of renovation. I also have extensive experiance working on/restoring autos.

I still have all my fingers, toes, eyes, etc.....

My humble opinion, there are times for specific safety gear, and times when the safety gear IS the hazard.

In Pete's videos, one time he is pushing a wide piece of material thru the table saw, another time a very small piece. I would NEVER use a push stick on that large piece, and I would ALWAYS use a push stick on the small piece.

Eye protection is great, as long as it does not restrict your vision.........

Safety gear will never replace care and common sense, and I have seen safety gear cause injury, by restricting movement or vision.

I should stop right here..........

Sheldon

PS - I might also mention much of my electrical and plumbing experiance when I was younger was in industrial/commercial construction, not just residential work......so I know all about "safety gear"..........

 

I do agree with every thing you said. Yes, I should use saftey glasses, very bad habbit of mine. How do keep the glasses from fogging ?

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Posted by Waldraff on Saturday, January 19, 2019 3:53 PM

mbinsewi

 

 
Waldraff
Not sure what you mean by fidgeting and handwork,

 

Not to butt in on Robert, but I think he, as I, wondered how the train is staged, and how it gets to the layout, and does it include picking up the train, one car at a time, and putting it back together again on the layout.

It seems like you have this all worked out, even with the helix!  Yes, we'd love to see the details!

Mike.

 

Mike,

This is the one criteria I had when wanted to build this. I did not want to remove and reset the trains back on the track every time I wanted to show it off. I will be releasing a video in the next two weeks. A quick answer, there is a outer loop and the inner helix and loop. The train will cross over a 1/16 gap from outer to inner when it is flipped. 

Subscribe to my video, you will then know when I upload it.

Thanks

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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Saturday, January 19, 2019 4:00 PM

Waldraff

 

 
ATLANTIC CENTRAL

Pete, very nice work.

This thread has taught me one important lesson, I will not be posting any videos of my upcoming layout construction........

I work with tools most everyday, for most of 45 years now, I am 61. I do carpentry, plumbing, electrical and more. I have built houses, restored (not renovated) ones over 100 years old, and done every sort of renovation. I also have extensive experiance working on/restoring autos.

I still have all my fingers, toes, eyes, etc.....

My humble opinion, there are times for specific safety gear, and times when the safety gear IS the hazard.

In Pete's videos, one time he is pushing a wide piece of material thru the table saw, another time a very small piece. I would NEVER use a push stick on that large piece, and I would ALWAYS use a push stick on the small piece.

Eye protection is great, as long as it does not restrict your vision.........

Safety gear will never replace care and common sense, and I have seen safety gear cause injury, by restricting movement or vision.

I should stop right here..........

Sheldon

PS - I might also mention much of my electrical and plumbing experiance when I was younger was in industrial/commercial construction, not just residential work......so I know all about "safety gear"..........

 

 

 

I do agree with every thing you said. Yes, I should use saftey glasses, very bad habbit of mine. How do keep the glasses from fogging ?

 

 

For the work you are doing, use the kind that are like regular eye glasses with side protectors, not the enclosed "goggle" kind.

Or, wear a full face shield.

Honestly, we seldom wear eye protection for basic stuff, but when the situation is difficult, the full face sheild is often best.

Sometimes I simply put on my plastic lens readers......generally you are just looking to stop a fair sized object.....

Sheldon 

    

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Posted by Waldraff on Sunday, February 10, 2019 5:09 PM

Hi everyone, I made another video, this time focussing on the layout and a closer look at how it works. Why is it not easier to upload pictures, still tring to figure it out?? Hope you enjoy.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xIeHMmSaMvM

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Posted by mbinsewi on Sunday, February 10, 2019 9:34 PM

Great job Pete!  Nice video of the build.  A drill battery!  Who knew!  By the time I'm done with my cordless drill batteries, they are shot, and so old, I can't find replacements, or the aftermarket batteries are more than I paid for the tool. Laugh

It forces me to upgrade!  I love it.  

Great job!

Mike.

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