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Reading RR Shamokin Division

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Reading RR Shamokin Division
Posted by Prowordsmith on Tuesday, October 09, 2018 10:07 PM

I thought the article was purty durn good.  I followed the Region Turn around the layout but when it came to the end at Shamokin Yard I couldn't figure out how the engine on the Turn, turned around for the trip back down the hill.  There's no turntables on the layout and I couldn't see any wyes in the trackplan.  Wha???

Towne Comee - San Antonio, Texas

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Posted by rrinker on Wednesday, October 10, 2018 8:16 PM

 That's a good question. The real Gordon had a wye, but that is not modeled, so a good question how the loco got facing back towards Tamaqua on the return trip. I've not yet seen Jim's layout in person even though he lives only a short distance down the road from me.

                                           --Randy


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by wp8thsub on Wednesday, October 10, 2018 8:53 PM

Think the photographer could have just turned the thing around to look right for the article?  Nah - that never happens in the magazines.

Rob Spangler

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Posted by rrinker on Thursday, October 11, 2018 7:10 AM

 Yeah because no one ever believes it when you say steam locos often ran significant distances in reverse.

 Although I am curious what the actual operating scheme is, if he really runs his locos backwards all the way to Tamaqua. The would almost certainly have turned them at Gordon. The coal regions were home to the early cab units, so with an A on either end of the consist, it wouldn't make one bit of difference for a diesel powered train. ABBA sets of F units were common on the grades there - sometimes still needing a push from a T-1 up the hill from Gordon.

                                  --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by BRAKIE on Thursday, October 11, 2018 7:10 AM

My guess is the author didn't know it was ok to operate tender first returning from a mine run so,he used the mighty 0-5-0 turntable in order to operate the engine in the proper direction..

Larry

SSRy

Conductor

“Shut one’s eyes tight or open one’s arms wide, either way, one’s a fool.” Flemeth-the witch of the Wilds.
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Posted by dehusman on Thursday, October 11, 2018 8:29 AM

BRAKIE
My guess is the author didn't know it was ok to operate tender first returning from a mine run so,he used the mighty 0-5-0 turntable in order to operate the engine in the proper direction..

Your guess would be wrong.  He has done extensive research on the area. The RDG had numerous wyes in that area and so would have turned the engines to face forward on the return trip.

Dave H. Painted side goes up.

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Posted by JAMES HERTZOG on Thursday, October 11, 2018 12:23 PM

Gents:

The answer to your question about the loco orientation is quite simple. Dave alluded to this, as I do know a fair amount about anthracite operations. I should have added it to the text, but did not, probaly due to being familar with the ops and probaly figuring no one would even notice.   First as alluded to earlier, the train turned at Locust Summit, not Shamokin.  The locomotive ran back downgrade tender first to Gordon where it would have been turned on the wye.  Then the Region Turnaround ran normal back to Tamaqua.  The RDG maintained wyes at Tamaqua, St. Nicholas, Gordon and Shamokin.  Because of space constraints I do not model any wyes.  My original trackplan had a wye at Gordon, but the best radius I could achieve was 26 inches, too tight for the long wheelbased steam engines. It was eliminated during construction and replaced with long engine house leads.  Glad to article was hopefully well received.  If you ever want to operate over the railroad consider signing up for our once a year operations weekends.  41 trains in 5 hours , all prototypically based. 

 

 
BRAKIE
My guess is the author didn't know it was ok to operate tender first returning from a mine run so,he used the mighty 0-5-0 turntable in order to operate the engine in the proper direction..

 

Your guess would be wrong.  He has done extensive research on the area. The RDG had numerous wyes in that area and so would have turned the engines to face forward on the return trip.

 

[/quote]

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Posted by BRAKIE on Thursday, October 11, 2018 12:36 PM

dehusman
Your guess would be wrong. He has done extensive research on the area. The RDG had numerous wyes in that area and so would have turned the engines to face forward on the return trip.

No doubt the real Reading did but,there is no way  to turn that engine.

I see no turntables and only one wye that is used for interchange with the L&NE.

Larry

SSRy

Conductor

“Shut one’s eyes tight or open one’s arms wide, either way, one’s a fool.” Flemeth-the witch of the Wilds.
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Posted by JAMES HERTZOG on Thursday, October 11, 2018 1:36 PM
The Turnaround ran only to Locust Summit, not Shamokin. The train turned at the summit and returned tender first downgrade to Gordon where the loco was turned on the Gordon wye (not modeled on the layout) Baldwin diesels put an end to this practice. Many mine turns ran tender first in the coal fields when needed. Jim H.
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Posted by JAMES HERTZOG on Thursday, October 11, 2018 1:41 PM
As Dave mentioned the RDG maintained wyes at Tamaqua, St. Nicholas, Gordon and Shamokin for turning steam power, mostly used on mine turns. Since space was at a premium on my layout I omitted the wyes. Many of my mine runs do operate tender first, even prototype helpers run tender first on occasion when time to turn was tight. Jim H.
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Posted by dknelson on Saturday, October 13, 2018 11:26 AM

JAMES HERTZOG
The RDG maintained wyes at Tamaqua, St. Nicholas, Gordon and Shamokin.  Because of space constraints I do not model any wyes.  My original trackplan had a wye at Gordon, but the best radius I could achieve was 26 inches, too tight for the long wheelbased steam engines. It was eliminated during construction and replaced with long engine house leads. 

You can see the prior track plan with the wye at Gordon in Model Railroad Planning 1998.  Although I now see doing away with the wye is mentioned in the text, I did not focus on that change when the Gordon and Locust Summit portion of the layout was featured again in Model Railroad Planning 2014.

Dave Nelson

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Posted by BRAKIE on Saturday, October 13, 2018 1:16 PM

JAMES HERTZOG
Many mine turns ran tender first in the coal fields when needed. Jim H.

Jim,Many modelers do not know that nor know a urban local or transfer run would return tender first to the yard.

Some branch lines lacked turntables or wyes as well.

Larry

SSRy

Conductor

“Shut one’s eyes tight or open one’s arms wide, either way, one’s a fool.” Flemeth-the witch of the Wilds.
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Posted by gmpullman on Saturday, October 13, 2018 1:34 PM

BRAKIE
Jim,Many modelers do not know that nor know a urban local or transfer run would return tender first to the yard.

Some railroads, B&A for one, had steam locomotives with "pilots" (or cowcatchers) on the tender specifically designed for bi-directional operation.

https://tinyurl.com/ybyfgkvt

Cheers, Ed

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Posted by rrinker on Saturday, October 13, 2018 3:55 PM

 Actually someone just posted on a Reading Facebook group a picture of a 2-8-0 Camelback with a pilot under the rear of the tender and an oversize light - obviously used to run tender-first on a regular basis.

                                        --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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