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Paint Not Drying

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  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • 6,315 posts
Paint Not Drying
Posted by maxman on Thursday, October 04, 2018 10:54 AM

Looking for some advice.  Painted up some wood items using the artist's oil paints that come in the small tubes.  Mixed it with some turpinoid as a thinner.

Been a week now and the paint is not drying.

Did I do something incorrectly?  And is there any way to hasten the drying?

Or is this just the nature of the beast and all I can do is stand around watching paint (not) dry?

Thanks

  • Member since
    December, 2010
  • From: Portland, Oregon
  • 411 posts
Posted by Attuvian on Thursday, October 04, 2018 11:28 AM

I suspect that you're dealing with the relative lack of volatility in the oil base, certainly as compared with other types of paints.  And artist oils behave quite differently that the oil-based paints we use to slap on our walls.  Slow drying is well known to artists who use them all the time.  I would check with a knowledgeable art store about the issue.  There may also be other factors that affect drying time.  The wood underneath might possibly be one of them, especially if it has been contaminated.  Some contaminations are not always apparent to the eye.

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    November, 2016
  • 360 posts
Posted by j. c. on Thursday, October 04, 2018 12:19 PM

oils are slow drying depinding on oil content (fat and lean)and using turp for thinner means that the wood can wick the turp in and slow the drying process even more , for wood if you want artist colors use acrilic thined with airbrush medium. 

  • Member since
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  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
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Posted by SeeYou190 on Thursday, October 04, 2018 2:40 PM

Artist's oil paints have very very very long drying times.

.

Sorry. Switch to Vallejo Acrylics. Wink

.

-Kevin

.

Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

  • Member since
    March, 2017
  • 1,214 posts
Posted by Track fiddler on Thursday, October 04, 2018 4:24 PM

SeeYou190

Artist's oil paints have very very very long drying times.

.

Sorry. Switch to Vallejo Acrylics. Wink

.

-Kevin

.

 

Yep what Kevin said.  I did a number of oil paintings when I was a kid and they took a month or better to dry. I was too impatient for that and switched to acrylic.

Artists like paint like that because they can re-blend if they don't like something, a few days or even a week later sometimes. 

  • Member since
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  • From: west coast
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Posted by rrebell on Friday, October 05, 2018 8:07 AM

Came with art world training. artist oils can take weeks to dry, note dry.  Acrylics  accually cure and can take months to cure if thick enough (not something we do). Acrylics tend to skim over as they cure from the outside in whereas oils disapate the solvents. Note, hope I got this all right, been a long time since I got out of school, about 40 years.

  • Member since
    February, 2008
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Posted by maxman on Sunday, October 07, 2018 11:01 AM

Thank you, gents.  Guess I'll just have to take a wait and see (if it drys) altitude.

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