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Pidgeon Creek structures from scratch

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  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Pidgeon Creek structures from scratch
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Sunday, July 30, 2017 1:34 PM

Structures for my freelance modified Pidgeon Creek layout section will be made from scratch. All of the wood for buildings will use spruce driftwood that I gather from the cobble beaches of West Jeddore, Nova Scotia (you can Google Map/Earth this location) less than an hour drive from my home in Dartmouth.

West Jeddore is a lovely little lobster fishing village on the Eastern Shore of Nova Scotia along the Atlantic Ocean. Here is a picture I took this morning while gathering more driftwood.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
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  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Sunday, July 30, 2017 1:39 PM

Here is my gathering bucket and a very sharp and lightweight Japanese saw. It was a good day to gather because we had rain recently which helps to wash off any salt crust on the surface of the wood. I also do a freshwater wash at home. Most of the salt has leached out of this wood because the driftwood has been tossed high on the beach by storms, out of the reach of normal tides. My rail ties are also made from spruce but from trees on my property in Victoria Harbour on the Bay of Fundy. No salt on this wood. (I can also use birch from wind-fallen trees on my property.)

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
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  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
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Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Sunday, July 30, 2017 1:45 PM

Two of my favourite wildflowers grow on this beach in the summer. The beach pea (Lathyrus japonicus) and the evening primrose (Oenothera biennis).

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Sunday, July 30, 2017 2:44 PM

Several months ago I experimented with West Jeddore driftwood and made several walls with different treatments, timber frame interiors, even a round clock for the wall. Cut one stained glass window with a shale sill on the inside. The shale is from Walton, Nova Scotia and will also be used for roofing and bedrock.

Most of my scratchbuilds will be from designs published in MR and RMC from 30 to 60 years ago - old school. I hope to start one this evening as an example in this thread. DJ

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
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  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Sunday, July 30, 2017 3:04 PM

There is a lot more to these walls than meets the eye. For example, take the timber frame wall. The outside is like the other two - small HO-scale planks of West Jeddore driftwood held together with fast-drying wood glue and cracks filled with red sandstone from Cape Blomidon, NS. Finally, a polyurethane coating. If the inside wall is not treated, the wall bends permanently. On the inside wall of the timber frame is a layer of gypsum from Windsor, NS (my invented HO version of Gyprock). This balances the stresses on both sides of the wall so it won't bend - even if there is no timber frame structure on the inside (like the other two walls shown). Takes at least two weeks to build one small structure but for me, it's the last hobby of my lifetime so I've got time.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
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  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Sunday, July 30, 2017 3:50 PM

The wooden clock on the wall is a small cross-section of West Jeddore driftwood and the hands are also driftwood. The black spots for the hours 3, 6, 9, and 12 are pieces of coal from the mine in Springhill, Nova Scotia.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Sunday, July 30, 2017 4:11 PM

I am much better at making windows today than that first attempt. I cut my own stained glass for all my structure's windows with the proper tools now, and I have read articles like Joe Kunzelmann's on windows: Model Railroader, Vol. 31(4), April 1964, pp. 51-53.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Monday, July 31, 2017 5:28 AM

Each piece of driftwood is cut into 4" lengths in order to fit across a 12" mitre box.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Monday, July 31, 2017 5:29 AM

Like this.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
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  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
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Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Monday, July 31, 2017 5:35 AM

Then I use my belt sander to flatten one side of a log so it won't roll around in the mitre box.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Monday, July 31, 2017 5:37 AM

All ready to slice off boards.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Monday, July 31, 2017 5:45 AM

Like this.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
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  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
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Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Monday, July 31, 2017 6:02 AM

A little more sanding and then into The Chopper.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Monday, July 31, 2017 6:11 AM

And there we are. One slice off one 4" log provided 12 boards ready for the wall. The thickness of the boards is sanded down to HO scale after the wall is fully glued together. This is how I make rail ties as well but not from driftwood as I mentioned earlier.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

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Posted by chutton01 on Monday, July 31, 2017 9:37 AM

So, is that the world's softest wood or are you using a mono-molecular blade in that chopper?
My chopper III, even with a fresh blade, would not make it thru a slab of wood that thick without skewing off noticiably (IIRC the instructions do specify a max thickness for material to cut).

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
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Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Monday, July 31, 2017 11:27 AM

It's well-aged spruce softwood. I have cut several hundred this thick with the same original blade. Hundreds more thinner pieces. When the blade wears out I'll sharpen it or get a new one. When/if The Cutter needs repairs I'll do it myself. Not a problem for me.

P.S. The cuts along the grain of the wood go through easily.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Monday, July 31, 2017 12:27 PM

In the last 1 hour I cut the rest of that 4" log. The yield was 45 boards and useful scraps that I save up to puree in a blender for scenery material.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Monday, July 31, 2017 12:47 PM

So that's it. Taking a break from this community forum for the rest of the summer. I have an RC aircraft to turn into an air-driven catamaran. 

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

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  • From: Southeast Texas
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Posted by mobilman44 on Monday, July 31, 2017 1:48 PM

Outstanding !!!

ENJOY  !

 

Mobilman44

 

Living in southeast Texas, modeling the "postwar" Santa Fe and Illinois Central 

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Monday, July 31, 2017 2:30 PM

mobilman44

Outstanding !!!

 

Just kidding. You see, that's how my former defence and intelligence company worked. Easy to bring out the worst! Lol

You can look up my company - Intrinsic Defence and Intelligence Enterprises on Nova Scotia businesses. Gone only on paper. :)

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Monday, July 31, 2017 4:03 PM

I will build a simple utility Shed. I have chosen a thin piece of shale from Walton, NS as the bedrock. While I build the foundation, I'll cut more boards and load them on a BC Rail 60' bulkhead flatcar used by one of the trackside industries. This car and a second with different road number, were made by Roundhouse Products. I bought them used but they're in great shape.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Monday, July 31, 2017 4:39 PM

It takes 40 minutes to bake my own plaster of Paris. While that is happening right now, I just cut another log by hand in 20 minutes. When I get my band saw set up, this hard part will only take 5 minutes.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: Southeast Texas
  • 4,770 posts
Posted by mobilman44 on Monday, July 31, 2017 5:01 PM

Hey, what about..."I have an RC aircraft to turn into an air-driven catamaran." 

That sounds like an interesting project.  What size motor is in there?   Is it 3 or 4 channels?  I wonder if Kalmbach has a forum for planes and/or watercraft.  If they do, and you follow thru and post, let us know!

 

ENJOY  !

 

Mobilman44

 

Living in southeast Texas, modeling the "postwar" Santa Fe and Illinois Central 

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Monday, July 31, 2017 5:12 PM

mobilman44

Hey, what about..."I have an RC aircraft to turn into an air-driven catamaran." 

That sounds like an interesting project.  What size motor is in there?   Is it 3 or 4 channels?  I wonder if Kalmbach has a forum for planes and/or watercraft.  If they do, and you follow thru and post, let us know!

I'll post some info tomorrow when I have breakfast at the Diner If you are interested.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Monday, July 31, 2017 5:16 PM

Two 4" logs cut and loaded on the flat car. It is a lot of building wood considering it's only from half of one of the pieces of driftwood I collected. Be much faster and neater when I use a band saw.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Monday, July 31, 2017 5:39 PM

To make a concrete-stone-looking foundation, I am going to use gypsum in its satin spar form from a beach on the Minas Basin near Cheverie, Nova Scotia. Gypsum is hydrated calcium sulphate. What I will do is drive the water out of the crystaline structures by baking this piece in the oven at 450 degrees for about 40 minutes.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Monday, July 31, 2017 5:42 PM

After baking (calcining is the thermodynamic term) the gypsum has turned a powder white colour.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Monday, July 31, 2017 5:45 PM

And it easily crumbles into plaster basically. Tomorrow I'll make my special concrete formula and build a foundation on the shale bedrock.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Tuesday, August 01, 2017 2:57 PM

Dehydrated a second piece of satin spar gypsum, crushed, and then sifted into two grades: powder and particulate.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 668 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Tuesday, August 01, 2017 3:17 PM

Using fast drying wood glue as a binder I start to build a base layer that adheres well to the shale bedrock.

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

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