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Substitute for Polly Scale Paint?

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Substitute for Polly Scale Paint?
Posted by n2mopac on Tuesday, June 04, 2013 10:33 AM

I have been doing some research since Testors announced the discontinuance of the Polly Scale paint line. I have used Polly Scale paint exclusively for over 20 years. I have read a lot on here about other lines of solvent-based paint to replace the Floquil line, but what is available in acrylics to replace Polly Scale? Someone give me some leads please.

Ron

Owner and superintendant of the N scale Texas Colorado & Western Railway, a protolanced representaion of the BNSF from Fort Worth, TX through Wichita Falls TX and into Colorado. 

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Posted by jrbernier on Tuesday, June 04, 2013 11:06 AM

Ron,

  Badger Modelflex is also an acrylic paint with lots of model railroad specific colors.  It is 'air brush' ready - All of the colors are thinned for air brushing.  Polly Scale needs to be thinned depending on the pigment.  One of the issues with the Badger paint is that it does not 'brush' on very good, and I have tended to use Polly Scale for the most part.

  Tru Line train paints are also acrylic, but mainly Canadian specific colors.  Tru Line paints are made by RPM(owner of Polly Scale) for True Line Trains - I suspect they may be gone as well in a few years.

  Tamiya has acrylic paints, but nothing with model railroad specific colors.

  Craft stores have several brands of acrylics(Apple Barrel/Creamcoat/FolkArt/etc, but nothing really railroad specific.

Jim

Modeling BNSF  and Milwaukee Road in SW Wisconsin

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Posted by AVRNUT on Tuesday, June 04, 2013 2:24 PM

Humbrol also has a fair size line of Acrylic model paints. They have about 25 railroad colors included in the line, which has over 100 colors total. They are available from Hornby America website & most cost around $2.05 per can.

Carl

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Posted by CTValleyRR on Tuesday, June 04, 2013 5:57 PM
Testors Modelmaster Acryl line has many colors that duplicate PollyScale shades. The only significant omission is railroad specific colors. Due to tha Rustoleum marketing muscle, these are widely available. I have been using both Mdelmaster and PollyScale for both airbripush and brush painting for years, with excellent results.

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Posted by thebarnet on Wednesday, June 05, 2013 2:56 AM

I use Vallejo's Model Colour and Game Colour ranges along with Games workshops Citadel paint range all three ranges are acrylics and very good i have been using the Games workshop range for the past ten years on my war gaming Models the only problems i can i think of is the Games workshop have changed the way there range works and how it's labeled. and both the Vallejo Game Colour range and  Games workshops Citadel paint range have bizarre names  

Apologies in advance for any use of UK RailRoad Terms 

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Posted by fkrall on Wednesday, June 05, 2013 7:47 AM

jrbernier

Ron,

  Badger Modelflex is also an acrylic paint with lots of model railroad specific colors.  It is 'air brush' ready - All of the colors are thinned for air brushing.  Polly Scale needs to be thinned depending on the pigment.  One of the issues with the Badger paint is that it does not 'brush' on very good, and I have tended to use Polly Scale for the most part.

 Jim

Jim,

I've had a different, more positive experience with Modelflex, which I like and find brushes well.  I'm painting my track with it as we speak.  I do start with Pollyscale SP Lettering Gray as a primer coat, and that might be the difference.  I also use artists' brushes, as i enjoy using acrylics, both craft and artists', but I don't know if that affects Modelflex brushability or not.

As to colors, Golden makes a quality line of artists' acrylics, and they have an online color mixer that I use frequently.  Google "golden online color mixer" to bring it and related articles up.  It can take some time, but I've used it to match railroad-specific colors by comparing swatches on a white index card.

Rick Krall

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Posted by NP2626 on Wednesday, June 05, 2013 7:48 AM

Scalecoat by Weaver Models has a line of railroad specific Acrylic paints called Scalecoat II.  Google Scalecoat and you'll get there.

NP 2626 "Northern Pacific, really terrific"

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Posted by maxman on Wednesday, June 05, 2013 1:03 PM

NP2626

Scalecoat by Weaver Models has a line of railroad specific Acrylic paints called Scalecoat II.  Google Scalecoat and you'll get there.

 
Scalecoat II is not acrylic.
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Posted by n2mopac on Wednesday, June 05, 2013 1:33 PM
Thanks y'all for your help. This gives me several options to try as well as some carrying opinions of quality to weigh. Appreciate it!

Owner and superintendant of the N scale Texas Colorado & Western Railway, a protolanced representaion of the BNSF from Fort Worth, TX through Wichita Falls TX and into Colorado. 

Check out the TC&WRy on at https://www.facebook.com/TCWRy

Check out my MRR How-To YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/c/RonsTrainsNThings

 

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Posted by NP2626 on Wednesday, June 05, 2013 4:26 PM

maxman

NP2626

Scalecoat by Weaver Models has a line of railroad specific Acrylic paints called Scalecoat II.  Google Scalecoat and you'll get there.

 
Scalecoat II is not acrylic.

I guess I have my information incorrect, I apologize to everyone who this may have mislead.  I don't know what type of paint it is and I can find nothing on Weavers website explaining the type of paints either of the two Scalecoat products are. 
Maxman, if you positively know that it is not acrylic, can you tell all of us what type of paint Scalecoat II is, than?

NP 2626 "Northern Pacific, really terrific"

Northern Pacific Railway Historical Association:  http://www.nprha.org/

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Posted by maxman on Wednesday, June 05, 2013 4:36 PM

NP2626
I don't know what type of paint it is and I can find nothing on Weavers website explaining the type of paints either of the two Scalecoat products are. 
Maxman, if you positively know that it is not acrylic, can you tell all of us what type of paint Scalecoat II is, than?

Well, my can of Scalecoat II thinner says "contains Petroleum Distillate".  Bottle of Scalecoat II that I have in front of me says "contains Xylene, Benzene, Butatone Oxime, and Petroleum Distillates".  None of this sounds like acrylic to me.

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Posted by NP2626 on Wednesday, June 05, 2013 4:47 PM

Excellent, thanks for clarifying.  Sometimes when you think you might be helping someone find a product to replace one that is being phased-out, it might pay to not make snap statements that you know nothing about!  For some reason I tend to do this on occasions, sorry for that.  

NP 2626 "Northern Pacific, really terrific"

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Posted by modelmaker51 on Sunday, June 09, 2013 7:36 PM

Scalecoat II is an enamel type paint, which means it is plastic compatable, it can be painted on plastics with out crazing as opposed to Scalcoat I which is laquer based and can craze plastics.

Jay 

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Posted by C&OFan on Monday, February 12, 2018 9:52 AM

Scalecoat does make RR specific colors, but they are solvent based and not a direct substitute for water based acrylics.  Personally, I don't use solvent based paints.  I don't have to have a vented spray booth to vent the toxic fumes.

 

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Posted by C&OFan on Monday, February 12, 2018 9:56 AM

No. Scalecoat is not acrylic, it solvent based paint.  Right now I believe that the only water based acrylics that have a wide variety of RR colors is ModelFlex by Badger.  I use them and they're great out of the bottle, but I've not had a lot of luck with brush painting them.  However, I've tride brush painting them directly on plastic without a primer coat....maybe that will make a difference.

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Posted by DigitalGriffin on Monday, February 12, 2018 10:38 AM

Wow,

Old thread from the dead for sure.

 

Any way, here's a good cross reference substitution chart: https://www.microscale.com/Floquil%20Color%20Chart.pdf

 

Testors has replaced many of the colors like the blacks and aged concrete, but not any real railroad specific ones.  I use model flex when I'm looking for a specific RR color.

https://www.testors.com/product-catalog/testors-brands/model-master/acrylic-paint/bottles

Don - Specializing in layout DC->DCC conversions

Modeling C&O transition era and steel industries There's Nothing Like Big Steam!

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Monday, February 12, 2018 11:54 AM

Vallejo and Citadel are readily available and are ten times better than Polly Scale ever was. They are also three times as expensive.

.

You can get any color you want, but the names are a bit wonky sounding.

.

-Kevin

.

Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

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Posted by doctorwayne on Monday, February 12, 2018 1:17 PM

modelmaker51

Scalecoat II is an enamel type paint, which means it is plastic compatable, it can be painted on plastics with out crazing as opposed to Scalcoat I which is laquer based and can craze plastics.

 

Both Scalecoat I and Scalecoat II use the same solvent ingredients, but in different proportions.  None of them are lacquer thinner, and according to the MSDS, the main ingredients are naptha and xylene (the latter a component of lacquer thinner).
Since the discontinuation of Pollyscale, I've switched to Scalecoat I, and have never had an issue using it on plastic, either airbrushed or brush-painted. 

Of all the paints I've used over the last 60-plus years, I found Pollyscale to be the one I liked best:  good coverage, fast-drying, durable on all materials, a wide range of available colours, easily thinned with water for airbrushing, and good coverage and self-levelling when brush painting. Also, very good shelf-life.

In my opinion, Testors would have been wiser to re-formulate their Model Master brand to the materials and standards used by RPM for Pollyscale.  The only paint I buy from Testors nowadays is Dullcote and Glosscote.

A very good paint for airbrushing was SMP's Accupaint, but for brush-painting, it was less useful.

The makers of the current crop of "airbrush-ready" paint assume that everybody uses an airbrush to paint everything, but I think that masking HO or N scale figures would become tiresome rather quickly.  They also assume that we'd gladly pay the already over-inflated prices for bottles which contain less paint and more  thinner, the latter often water or other cheap solvents.  No thanks.

Wayne

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Posted by DigitalGriffin on Monday, February 12, 2018 1:18 PM

SeeYou190

Vallejo and Citadel are readily available and are ten times better than Polly Scale ever was. They are also three times as expensive.

.

You can get any color you want, but the names are a bit wonky sounding.

.

-Kevin

.

 



Good grief.  I was paying like $6/bottle when polyscale was around.

I have no quaroms with Polyscale.  But it's mostly all I ever used.  It just worked.

Don - Specializing in layout DC->DCC conversions

Modeling C&O transition era and steel industries There's Nothing Like Big Steam!

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Posted by snjroy on Monday, February 12, 2018 1:19 PM

Yup, old thread but an ongoing challenge.

I tried Vallejo myself but I was not super happy with their grimy black, and with the paint in general. It does not seem to stick on surfaces as well as the old Polly-scale paints did. I'm sure a good undercoat would make a difference.

I tried Rapido's paint:

https://rapidotrains.com/proto-paint/

... And loved it. It is airbrush ready, which I know is a turn-off for many folks. I did try it with a brush and found that it still works OK for touch-ups. 

Simon

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Monday, February 12, 2018 2:02 PM

snjroy
I tried Vallejo myself but I was not super happy with their grimy black, and with the paint in general. It does not seem to stick on surfaces as well as the old Polly-scale paints did.

.

Both Citadel and Vallejo are intended for miniature figure painters and wargamers as the primary target consumer.

.

Both of these groups tend to use flat black as a primer base, and Citadel and Vallejo go on over flat black quite well.

.

Also, the pgment loads in these paints is very high, so they must be thinned before usage. Water is not a good thinner for these. You can find volumes of oppinions online for the best ways to thin these paints.

.

The choice of brush is also very important. I use Windsor & Newton Series 7 pure Russian Sable (Weasel Tail) brushes.

.

-Kevin

.

Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Monday, February 12, 2018 2:14 PM

Since I still have not been able to master using acrylic paint in an airbrush, I will just stick with Scalecoat......It works great, it is ready to decal, their clear flat and clear gloss can be mixed for any sheen.......

Getting ready to order some more this week.

Sheldon

    

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Posted by DigitalGriffin on Monday, February 12, 2018 2:23 PM

What was the reason for polyscale getting out of the business any way?

I have like 40 bottles I refuse to part with but they are running out and slowly drying up.

Don - Specializing in layout DC->DCC conversions

Modeling C&O transition era and steel industries There's Nothing Like Big Steam!

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Monday, February 12, 2018 2:34 PM

DigitalGriffin
What was the reason for polyscale getting out of the business any way?

.

This has been a crazy problem with paints for more than a decade now.

.

Citadel changed all their colors and paint formulas about ten years ago and left us all swinging in the breeze with half-painted armies.

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Ral Partha dropped their VERY BEST EVER paints and left the market completely.

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Army Painter products are getting harder and harder to find.

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Floquil Paints are gone, and that left countless Model Railroaders with no practical recourse for keeping their color schemes consistant.

.

Polly Scale went away (both model railroad colors and fantasy figure painting colors) and left even more problems.

.

Delta Ceramcoat seems to have changed there formula, their line of used-to-be-top-quality paints have become runny and do not cover well.

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Vallejo "Model Color" paints seem to have been reformulated to more closely match the properties of their "Game Color" line, but at least the colors seem to be consistent.

.

Reaper has dropped one of their lines of paint and are only producing "Pro-Paint" now, which has eliminated a lot of the colored metallics they had, most importantly the metallic red that everyone loved. This was the only close match for Ral-Partha's metallic red.

.

Scalecoat was discontinued briefly, but then brought back to life, but for how long?

.

And so on and so on...

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Honestly, if I was producing a new paint scheme I would only consider Tamiya paints at this point. I think they have the best chance at staying power.

.

-Kevin

.

Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Monday, February 12, 2018 2:44 PM

Slight correction:

Scalecoat was never "discontunued". It may be sematics, but Weaver, who owned Scalecoat closed up for retirement. Weaver sold Scalecoat to Minuteman Scale Models......the move and ownership transfer took time.

Unlike Testors, Weaver/Scalecoat was not part of some bigger hobby industry/paint industry company. It was a small family run manufacturer.

Much of model railroading remains small "cottage" industries, even with "overseas" production of many items......

The problem here is big brother protecting you from yourself.........

Sheldon

    

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Posted by DigitalGriffin on Monday, February 12, 2018 8:51 PM

ATLANTIC CENTRAL

 

The problem here is big brother protecting you from yourself.........

Sheldon

 



Huh?

Don - Specializing in layout DC->DCC conversions

Modeling C&O transition era and steel industries There's Nothing Like Big Steam!

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Posted by doctorwayne on Monday, February 12, 2018 11:23 PM

DigitalGriffin

ATLANTIC CENTRAL

The problem here is big brother protecting you from yourself.........

Sheldon

Huh?

I'd guess Sheldon to be referring to the alarmist attitude of those in power towards products they deem harmful to the user or to the environment.  In light of the quantities involved, this is too much of a "the sky is falling" attitude.

It also speaks to the obtuse thinking that the general populace is supposedly unable to grasp the concept of safe handling of useful, but possibly dangerous, materials, such as some solvents, lead, pointy things, etc.
Therefore, you will soon be allowed to have only all-sponge paint brushes, X-Acto knives, pliers, scissors, etc., etc., and possibly water to use as paint.  That last one is, I think, doubtful, as apparently people have drowned in water, so it's use should be curtailed.

Thinning of the herd will not be left to natural selection, but believe me, the selection has begun, and we are not in charge.

I am in full agreement with Sheldon's opinion.

Wayne

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, February 12, 2018 11:35 PM

doctorwayne
possibly water to use as paint. That last one, is I think, doubtful, as apparently people have drowned in water, so it's use should be curtailed...

Learn more about this critical issue here.

 

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Monday, February 12, 2018 11:45 PM

I do not agree with the alarmist oppinions.

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We can still buy liquid styrene cement, super glue, razor blades, scissors, etc, and so on.

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I believe all the paints being discontinued were business decisions, nothing more.

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There are ALL KINDS of exceptions in regulatory codes for small quantities intended for consumers. The classic example was always White-Out correction fluid. Consumers can even buy some items that industries might have a harder time with, like chlorinated cleaning fluids and MEK.

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When you can no longer buy a 10" radial arm saw at Home Depot, then I will listen to you concerns on regulatory over-reach.

.

-Kevin

.

Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

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Posted by gmpullman on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 12:36 AM

SeeYou190
I do not agree with the alarmist oppinions.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dihydrogen_monoxide_hoax

 

 


 

I adopted Scalecoat I and II as my paint-of-choice. Excellent results.

I have scores of Polly Scale bottles and I'm using many of them for less-critical jobs. Some are reaching twenty years of age. I "reconstitute" it and add adjuncts, such as Vallejo Airbrush Flow Improver and remix it, strain it and use it for vehicles, structures and figures.

Thank You, Ed

 

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